Hoyt helix price

Hoyt helix price DEFAULT

Helix Turbo

350 FPS (ATA)
31" Axle-to-Axle
5⅞" Brace Height
4.4 lbs

Logo

LAY DOWN THE HAMMER.

LAY DOWN THE HAMMER.

LAY DOWN THE HAMMER.

Why shoot a Turbo? Why drive a muscle car? Because there’s sheer satisfaction in wielding ungodly power simply because you can. Helix turbo turns the kinetic energy up to 11 without the wily kick associated with faster bows. It comes loaded with our most advanced technologies, including Limb Shox, Shock Pods, StealthShot, and super-charged ZT Turbo Pro Cams.

Why shoot a Turbo? Why drive a muscle car? Because there’s sheer satisfaction in wielding ungodly power simply because you can. Helix turbo turns the kinetic energy up to 11 without the wily kick associated with faster bows. It comes loaded with our most advanced technologies, including Limb Shox, Shock Pods, StealthShot, and super-charged ZT Turbo Pro Cams.

Why shoot a Turbo? Why drive a muscle car? Because there’s sheer satisfaction in wielding ungodly power simply because you can. Helix turbo turns the kinetic energy up to 11 without the wily kick associated with faster bows. It comes loaded with our most advanced technologies, including Limb Shox, Shock Pods, StealthShot, and super-charged ZT Turbo Pro Cams.

ZT PRO TURBO CAM TECHNOLOGY

Our all-new ZT Pro (Zero-Torque) Turbo Cam creates a balanced side-to-side load with the patent-pending Split-Cable System, eliminating the need for a flexible cable guard. This reduces cable-induced torque and lateral nock travel resulting in dead-center accuracy. The ZT Pro Turbo Cam is the fastest cam in our entire product line.

ROLLER CABLE GUARD

Silky smooth roller guards make for a smoother draw cycle and reduce friction for increased efficiency and shot performance.

REAR STABILIZER MOUNT

No single bow setup is perfect for everyone. The key to accuracy is customizing your bow to your shot. Hoyt bows feature an integrated rear stabilizer mount so you can seamlessly balance your rig your way.

X-ACT™ GRIP SYSTEM

Your first impression shooting a bow ultimately starts with the grip. Extensive, in-depth research and development made sure that experience was as good as it gets when shooting a Hoyt. From the width and angle to the overall shape, the X-ACT Grip practically holds your hand through the shot, making sure you have proper hand placement time and time again.

SHOCK PODS™

Our Innovative Shock Pod Vibration Damping System kills vibration in the bow riser leaving you with a dead-in-hand shot and sweet, sweet silence.

Logo

AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL HOYT DEALER.

AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL HOYT DEALER.

AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL HOYT DEALER.

The lower brace height and souped-up cam system on Helix Turbo delivers maximum speed and kinetic energy for expert bowhunters looking to get the job done on the toughest animals.

The lower brace height and souped-up cam system on Helix Turbo delivers maximum speed and kinetic energy for expert bowhunters looking to get the job done on the toughest animals.

The lower brace height and souped-up cam system on Helix Turbo delivers maximum speed and kinetic energy for expert bowhunters looking to get the job done on the toughest animals.

FIND YOUR LOCAL DEALER

*U.S. pricing shown. Additional fee applies for signature series and custom bows. See dealer for details..

Sours: https://hoyt.com/compound-bows/turbo-series/helix-turbo

Hoyt Helix Review

Editors' review

Hoyt focuses a lot of marketing on their carbon riser hunting bows, and rightfully so given the love of carbon risers and the benefits they offer shooters. However, not everyone likes the giant price tag that comes with a carbon riser bow, or even prefer the added mass an aluminum bow offers. For those shooters, the Helix is a really nice offering with every benefit of the RX-3 series minus the carbon riser. The Helix gets the same new grip, new cams, new riser design, and wide limbs with zero tolerance pockets to keep everything working flawlessly. The Helix has a compact size with a 30.5-inch axel-to-axel measurement, and is a bowhunter's dream bow in terms of how smoothly it draws for the down range speed and accuracy produced. With an MSRP of $1199 the Helix is a bit expensive for an aluminum hunting bow, but it does have all the bells and whistles it should have to be competitive in the 2019 hunting bow market, which is stacked with phenomenal shooting bows. For those wanting the latest Hoyt technology, without the price tag of the carbon model, the Helix is a true winner.

Finish

Hoyt bows are finished very well leaving the final product one of the best looking on the market. The Helix can be rigged up with a large number of hunting and target options allowing shooters the ability to have a great looking bow in a variety of different finishes. For hunting colors, Hoyt offers Realtree Edge, Under Armour Ridge Reaper Barren, Gore Elevated II and Subalpine, and Kuiu Verde 2.0. Shooters can also go with the new Stone color or the Blackout option if they are interested in a solid color for hunting purposes. On the target side of things, Hoyt uses a black riser with color dipped limbs. Limb colors are available in green, blue, red, orange, white, and purple. In addition to these options, shooters can also choose from the Bone Collector or Cameron Hanes Ultimate Predator Special edition rigs.

Riser

The Helix is a compact hunting bow with a riser made of aluminum. Although the axle-to-axle measurement is only 30.5-inches, the shape of the riser is more deflexed than most would imagine given the shorter nature of the bow, which helps it feel like a longer axle-to-axle bow. The Helix also has a 6-inch brace height, which is perhaps a little shorter than some would like to see, but ultimately it helps produce speeds up to 342 feet per second.Hoyt spent a great deal of research and development time and money to make the Helix more quiet and shock free than any other hunting bow they have ever produced. In doing so, they have implemented a Shock pods system, which mounts to the bottom of the riser near the limb pocket area. The Shock Pods are a dampening system taking the leftover noise and vibration away from the riser and ultimately from being felt by the shooter's grip hand. When combined with the newly designed Stealthshot dampener, the Helix becomes exactly what engineers set out to create - a silent, dead in hand shooter.Hoyt engineers also have a couple other selling points added to the Helix riser. The ZT Pro cam system is one that allows for optimal nock travel. So much so that the cable containment system no longer places a great deal of torque on the riser, and the system no longer needs to be flexible. The roller guards simply guide the cables through the wheels, but they do not need to flex or move to keep things where they need to be. The upper end of the riser also has a bit of a cage design as well, which adds some necessary strength to the riser where it needs it the most. Last but not least, the Helix riser adds a rear mounted stabilizer bushing as well, which is off-set to match the front facing bushing. Shooters wanting to add a back bar now have greater ability to do so.

Grip

The all-new X-Act grip makes its debut to the Hoyt lineup with the Helix and REDWRK series bows. This grip takes on a new shape and size being thinner and flatter than Hoyt has offered in the past, which is a welcomed addition for many shooters given the trend in the archery world to go this direction. The composite one-piece grip is comfortable to hold, and feels great at full draw as well. The flatter grip makes it a little easier to shooters to repeat their hand placement, which is sure to increase accuracy. Some early reviews have claimed the older wooden grip to be more comfortable to hold, but the flat back is easier to repeat.

Limbs

The split limb technology continues to get the nod for Hoyt engineers. These limbs can withstand any normal shooting conditions, and given the research and development of 1500 dry fires and a million draw cycles at 80-pounds and 30-inches of draw should give shooters a great deal of confidence. Hoyt also offers the most limb configurations of any flagship bow with maximum draw weights of 80, 70, 65, 60, 50, and 40-pounds. The split limbs also come with a dampener straight from the factory, with the option of changing out the color from the factory installed black if desired. Hoyt also rethought the limb pockets to give them an even more secure fit to the riser.

Eccentric System

The ZT Pro cams are the newest hunting cam system from the Hoyt camp, and Hoyt claims it is the smoothest drawing, highest performance cam they have created. The Helix riser design gives the bow a 6-inch brace height, which flings arrows up to 342 feet per second. Although there are faster hunting bows on the market, the Helix is a great mix of smooth drawing and hard hitting. The ZT Pro sticks with the split cable system creating a more balanced side load on the cam during the draw cycle. This eliminates cam lean, and the need for a flexible cable containment system. Less nock travel side to side will surely result in better accuracy as well, and the non-moving cable system allows for less to fail on a hunt of a lifetime. Hoyt has two base cams for the Helix with a modular draw length adjustment for easy changes within the draw length range. The first cam adjusts from 25-28 inches, and the second cam ranges from 27-30-inches. The new cams also get the most let off of any Hoyt cam produced as well. In an archery world where high let-offs seem to be king, Hoyt's new ZT Pro cam joins in with the other offerings.

Draw Cycle/Shootability

The Helix is a compact hunting bow, and has the characteristics to live up to the name. The new ZT Pro cam system is a great one, and Hoyt claims it is their smoothest drawing, fastest shooting cam system ever produced. The cams seem to hold weight pretty deep into the draw cycle, but the valley is smooth, and the back wall has a familiar Hoyt feel with just a little bit of sponge. After the shot, shooters get a true sense of the magic of the Helix as the arrow zips towards the target while the sound and vibration are very minimal. For a short axle-to-axle bow, shooters will be shocked at how well it holds on target. The 4.3-pound barebow weight seems a bit heavy on paper, but it does not feel that way in hand and actually may help with keeping the bow quiet and vibration free.

Usage Scenarios

The Helix is an unapologetic hunting bow. It will still perform well for the weekend warriors looking to hone their accuracy, but the Helix's main purpose will be as a hunting bow.

Hoyt Helix vs. Hoyt REDWRX Carbon RX-3

BowHoyt HelixHoyt REDWRX Carbon RX-3
Version20192019
PictureHoyt HelixHoyt REDWRX Carbon RX-3
Brace Height6 "6 "
AtA Length30.5 "30.5 "
Draw Length25 " - 30 "25 " - 30 "
Draw Weight30 lbs - 80 lbs30 lbs - 80 lbs
IBO Speed342 fps342 fps
Weight4.3 lbs3.9 lbs
Let-Off80% - 85% 80% - 85%
Where to buy
Best prices online
Not available now.
Please check later.
compare more bows

These bows are virtually identical in real life specifications and will appeal to the same potential buyers. The largest difference, which is a pretty significant difference, is the makeup of the riser. The Helix has the newly designed aluminum riser and the Hoyt REDWRX Carbon RX-3 has the newly designed carbon riser. The aluminum riser comes with a $500 cheaper price tag, which many will appreciate. The overall weight of the aluminum riser is a bit heavier as well tipping the scales at 4.3-pounds versus 3.9-pounds. The different risers will have a different feel to some shooters, but most shooters are going to make their final decision based on price. Those able to afford the carbon will more than likely go that route whereas those with a smaller budget will more than likely choose the aluminum model.

Summary

The Helix is a non-apologetic hunting bow. Everything from the compact design, the overall performance, and the feel of the Helix is done to create the meanest hunting bow Hoyt can produce with an aluminum riser. The new grip is easy to shoot, and the lateral movement options to get the best tune possible truly shows how dedicated Hoyt is in producing the best shooting hunting rig they can. The cams are smooth, and easy to draw, and the feeling after the shot is one of the deadest feels from a Hoyt hunting bow, possibly ever. The 4.3-pounds barebow weight may be slightly on the heavy side on paper for such a compact model, but in hand it balances perfectly and feels solid holding on target. The MSRP of $1199 is a premium price for an aluminum risered hunting bow, but with all the updates from the previous model year, many shooters will have no problem paying the extra price to have what may consider the best hunting bow from Hoyt in recent years. For those wanting the latest and greatest technology from an industry leader in the hunting world, the Helix has a great deal to offer potential customers.
Sours: http://compoundbowchoice.com/brands/hoyt/helix/review/
  1. Ios 10 not updating
  2. Wilsonart calacatta marble
  3. Dns rdata
  4. Styrene model making
  5. Monitor adapter vga to dvi

Hoyt Helix Compound Bow

Hoyt Helix
Editor review:

The Helix is a non-apologetic hunting bow. Everything from the compact design, the overall performance, and the feel of the Helix is done to create the meanest hunting bow Hoyt can produce with an aluminum riser. The new grip is easy to shoot, and the lateral movement options to get the best tune possible truly shows how dedicated Hoyt is in producing the best shooting hunting rig they can. The cams are smooth, and easy to draw, and the feeling after the shot is one of the deadest feels from a Hoyt hunting bow, possibly ever. The 4.3-pounds barebow weight may be slightly on the heavy side on paper for such a compact model, but in hand it balances perfectly and feels solid holding on target. The MSRP of $1199 is a premium price for an aluminum risered hunting bow, but with all the updates from the previous model year, many shooters will have no problem paying the extra price to have what may consider the best hunting bow from Hoyt in recent years. For those wanting the latest and greatest technology from an industry leader in the hunting world, the Helix has a great deal to offer potential customers... read full review

User reviews:
  • Excellent Bow! Best Aluminum Riser Bow that Hoyt has built... by Darren Kennedy from Newark, Ohio

Read all reviews

Manufactured:2019 (1 version)

Latest version:2019 Hoyt Helix

Brace Height6 "
Axle to Axle Length30.5 "
Draw Length25 " - 30 "
Draw Weight30 lbs - 80 lbs
IBO Speed342 fps
Weight4.3 lbs
Let-Off80% - 85%

Explore specs

Sours: http://compoundbowchoice.com/brands/hoyt/helix/
Bowtech Realm SS vs Hoyt Helix - Strong Shot Archery Reviews

Compound Bow Review: Hoyt Helix

The 2019 Hoyt Helix was a popular hunting bow. It was quiet and quick, and the overall fourth-place finisher of our annual bow test. The Helix Turbo, still available, is the same bow with a little shorter brace height, with a good appeal to speed freaks everywhere.

Hoyt Helix Turbo Specs

  • Speed: 350 fps ATA
  • Axle-to-Axle Length: 31 inches
  • Brace Height: 5 7/8 inches
  • Weight: 4.4 pounds
  • Peak Draw Weights: 40, 50, 60, 65, and 70 pounds
  • Draw Lengths: 26-28 inches; 28-30 inches

What Kind of Hunting Bow Is the Hoyt Helix?

The 2019 Hoyt Helix was a flagship hunting bow with a machined aluminum riser. Though the Helix has been discontinued, used models are still available and Hoyt still offers the Turbo version of the Helix, which has a shortened, sub-6-inch brace height for a little extra speed and a slightly modified cam system. We’ve tested both compound bows. The Helix featured the ZT (Zero Torque) cam system, and the Turbo has the ZT Turbo Pro system. Two different cam configurations allow for two different draw length range settings, and they come with adjustable cable stops, too, so shooters can tweak the back-wall feel to their liking. The cams are paired with a Split-Cable system that’s interesting and mitigates the need for a flexible cable guard (though the bow does have roller guards). The split cable also makes for a convenient spot to tie in a drop-away rest.   

The Helix has some other key updates compared to previous year models, too, including a more rigid, slightly heavier riser and a noise-dampening Shock Pod setup on the bottom limb, plus an updated grip and other thoughtful additions, like rear stabilizer mounts. With a fairly demanding draw cycle and price tag, the Helix—and especially the Turbo version—is a bow that’s probably best suited for more advanced archers and bowhunters, but it’s a good bow for anyone willing to pay for performance.

How We Tested the Hoyt Helix

We tested the Hoyt Helix in spring of 2019 as part of our annual compound bow review. Per procedure for that test, we received two of each participating compound bow. One is set to IBO specs: a 30-inch draw length and 70 pounds. The other is set to 28 inches and 60 pounds, for hands-on range testing. We verify all the specs of the IBO bows upon arrival, and adjust them as needed. Then we chronograph them with a bare-shaft, 350-grain IBO-spec arrow. We use a Whisker Biscuit rest and D-loop for this procedure, so you can assume a loss of 5 feet per second, give or take, with those things added.

Noise and Vibration

Once that is finished, we take the IBO-spec bows to Stress Engineering, where we use their equipment and procedures to measure noise and vibration for each bow, in addition to mapping draw force curves and calculating efficiency. Bows are randomly labeled during this phase of the test so that when the results are in, we know they’re unbiased.

Accuracy and Forgiveness

Next, we set up the 60-pound bows with drop-away rests, sights, and peeps, and then we paper-tune them. Our shooting panel then evaluates the bows by shooting and measuring a series of 25-yard groups with each of them, using 340-spine Carbon Express arrows, cut to 28.5 inches. During that, we also subjectively evaluate the categories of draw cycle, fit and finish, balance and handling, and grip. Our accuracy and forgiveness test—where multiple shooters measure multiple groups from multiple bows over the course of several days—is unique to our review, but we believe it’s the most important part of the test. Just about any bow can shoot one-hole groups through a Hooter Shooter. And just about any individual shooter can have a bad day. But with multiple shooters over the course of several days, certain trends do indeed emerge from bow to bow, and that’s what we’re after. Everyone makes minor errors in form and release. The bows that consistently shoot well—regardless of who’s shooting them—are, by definition, the most forgiving.

How the Hoyt Helix Performed in Our Test

The Hoyt Helix placed fourth in our 2019 test to find the best compound bow for hunting. The Helix earned high marks in the following categories:

  • Speed (and the Hoyt Helix Turbo is even faster)
  • Accuracy and Forgiveness
  • Balance and Handling
  • Noise and Vibration (that is, a lack of both)
  • Fit and Finish

What the Hoyt Helix Does Best

The original Hoyt Helix was one of the fastest compound bow models of that year’s test at 342 fps (on our chronograph). The Helix Turbo is a scorcher at 350 fps. Some bow brands inflate their advertised speeds, but set up properly, Hoyt bows almost always shoot as fast as promised. That speed makes the Helix a flat-shooting bow, and that’s never a bad thing. At whitetail hunting ranges, more speed paired with a middle-weight hunting arrow means you can get reliable penetration with large cutting-diameter broadheads. For stalking open-country mule deer and antelope, where shots tend to be rangy, extra speed allows for a flatter-shooting arrow. That’s a big deal if your rangefinder reads a yucca plant at 56 yards, but the buck is standing just beyond it, at 61. Target shooters, especially unknown distance 3D archers, like a fast bow, too, since it compensates for range estimation errors.

But enough of that, because speed isn’t everything. Some speed bows are loud and they kick, but the Helix is not. In fact, it was one of the quieter bows in our test, and almost dead-in-the-hand to shoot. It handled nicely and as expected from Hoyt, fit and finish were flawless. And maybe best of all, the Helix is a shooter. Our test panel averaged 1.34-inch groups with it, the third smallest of the test.  

What the Hoyt Helix Does Worst

The original Helix was something of a handful. We docked the most points for its demanding draw cycle. The Turbo model, with a shorter brace height, is even more demanding on the front end of the draw cycle. At full draw, the Helix has a pretty good back wall, a generous valley and plenty of let-off. Drawing this bow could be a chore on a cold morning, but then again it’s hard to fault a bow with Turbo in the name for being demanding on the front end of the draw cycle. More speed always comes at some sort of price. Speaking of price, the Helix Turbo (the one still available) is expensive ($1,249) compared to the aluminum flagship competition.

Does the Hoyt Helix Deliver on its Mission?

Yes. Competition is tight in our bow test, and any new flagship that cracks the top-five list is near flawless. The 2019 Helix may no longer be available new, but the Turbo version still is, and if you’re shopping for a speed bow, it’s one of the best ones out there right now. Maybe do a few push-ups before you grab hold of it, but expect the Hoyt Helix to be a premium bow that’s quiet and accurate, and one of the fastest models on the market today.

Sours: https://www.fieldandstream.com/outdoor-gear/hoyt-helix-review/

Price hoyt helix

Hoyt Helix Turbo Compound Bow Review

When the Hoyt Helix Turbo arrived on my doorstep, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I’m not a big speed bow freak for bow hunting. Give me a long, heavy, and generous brace-height tack driver any day of the week and twice on Sunday. The Helix Turbo is a flamethrower. The bow is branded with an fps rating of 350, fitted with a 5 7/8-inch brace height, and measures 31 inches axle-to-axle bow. I found that this was a solid, do-it-all bow that was surprisingly easy to shoot accurately.

Hoyt Helix Turbo Specs
FPS:
350
Axle-to-Axle: 31 inches
Brace Height: 5 7/8 inches
Mass Weight: 4.4 pounds
Cam: ZT Turbo Pro
Draw Lengths: 26 to 28 inches and 28 to 30 inches
Peak Draw Weights: 40, 50, 60, 65 and 70 pounds

Color Options: Buckskin, Wilderness, Realtree Edge, Kuiu Verde 2.0, Gore Optifade Subalpine, Gore Optifade Elevated II, Black Out, UA All-Season Keep Hammering, Black Out Keep Hammering, Black Out Bone Collector, and Realtree Edge Bone Collector

Who is the Hoyt Helix Turbo Designed For?

I’ve been a fan of Hoyt bows since I fired carbon through one more than 15 years ago. Since that time, I’ve tested and hunted with many Hoyt hunting bows — the Katara, Alpha Max 32, Carbon Element, and Axius Alpha — to name a few. I love Hoyt’s dedication to innovation and building durable bows that tend to provide a healthy balance of accuracy, speed, and a vibration-free shot. The Hoyt Helix Turbo is a good representation of the Hoyt compound bow brand. It’s a compact bow, that would be ideal for mountain hunters who want to stalk without their bow hanging up in the timber, but it’s equally useful for stand hunters shooting out of the tight confines of a blind or stand.

Testing the Hoyt Helix Turbo

I’ve tested hundreds of compound bows. I love the process of testing hunting bows, and it’s always exciting to see innovations at work. I’ve been disappointed a few times — tested bows that didn’t live up to the hype. Of course, most often, the bows work as I expect. New technologies perform as advertised, and the bow is everything it should be. Then, there are those rare times when I’m shocked by a bow’s performance and fall head over heels in love with it. I was hoping this would be the case with the Hoyt Helix Turbo.

Man shooting with the Hoyt Helix Turbo

But before I really dig into a bow and get into the tuning process, I like to spend time getting to know the bow. The only way to do that is to shoot it. Putting 50 or 60 arrows through the bow helps get string stretch out, and in my opinion, makes the tuning process easier. For a speed bow, the Hoyt Helix Turbo drew with a gentle smoothness I didn’t expect. I tip my hat to how the ZT (Zero-Torque) Pro Turbo Cams and Roller Cable Guard work in harmony. Weight builds quickly, but the transition to letoff is not at all abrupt. The draw stops contact the bow’s inner cable and provide a firm but not rock-hard back wall. I was pleasantly surprised that the ZT Pro Turbo Cams weren’t itching to spring into action. I’ve shot more than one cam system designed for speed that, if you crept at all, would want to pull your shoulder through the riser. This cam isn’t like that. I could settle into my anchor and focus on aiming. I’m a back-tension release shooter and I loved the feel of the draw stops against the cable. I could pull into my release while pressing into the grip and execute a solid shot.

Going along with the smooth draw cycle and pleasant full-draw feel is how hushed and vibration-free this bow was at the shot. It doesn’t feel like a speed bow. When the release breaks, the arrow is gone, but the bow sits like a well-trained retriever. I detected no post-shot hand vibration, and the rig is quiet. This is without question the most controlled speed bow I’ve shot top to bottom. I will note that I was shooting heavy (466.8-grain) Easton FMJ 5MM arrows, which undoubtedly helped with the quiet shot. However, I also give some noise- and vibration-canceling credit to the Shock Pods located on the bottom of the riser just above the limb pockets. And as previously noted, the dampeners between the limbs soak up a fair amount of vibration as well.

Testing Gear included: Hornady GPI Scale; Last Chance Deluxe Bow Press; Caldwell Ballistic Precision Chronograph; Pine Ridge Archery Arrow Inspector.

Fit and Finish

Like most Hoyt bows, the Hoyt Helix Turbo was an out-of-the-box stunner. The riser was cloaked in Realtree Edge, and the Helix Turbo stamped limbs were black. The bow passed the eye test. There were zero dings, nicks, or paint chips, and its appearance was sleek and compact. Dampeners rest between the top and bottom split limbs, and the Roller Guard is slim and hugs tight to the riser.

One of the first things I like to do, even before I start setting the bow up, is close my eyes and lay my hand into the grip. How a bow feels in hand from the get-go is super important. I’ve gripped many bows and known from the start we weren’t going to get along. That wasn’t the case with the Hoyt Helix Turbo. Not a direct-to-riser grip, the X-Act Grip System is thin, perfectly angled, and flat-backed. The throat isn’t too deep, and my palm fell into the grip perfectly.

The Build

The ZT Pro Turbo Cam comes in a pair of draw-length option modules (26- to 28-inch and 28- to 30-inch), and I had no trouble setting the bow to a 29-inch draw length via the A-E draw-stop holes. As for draw weight, I’m not as young as I once was, and one complete revolution of the top and bottom limb bolts set my draw weight at a measured 67.74 pounds. The limb bolts turned easily and there was no chatter, popping, or sticking. The bow pressed like a dream and the setup process was simple. Accessories attached with ease, and I had no trouble with any pre-drilled screw holes. The Fuse string did cause some peep rotation, but removing the string from the top cam and giving it a quarter left turn fixed the problem.

Tuning

Sometimes you have to turn the yokes, and some bows are more difficult to tune than others. What I’ve found, though, is after the break-in period, about 80 percent of all tuning can be done by changing the nocking point and manipulating the rest. The Hoyt Helix Turbo tuned up with ease. I did change the nocking point, as I found the ideal position for the attached QAD UltraRest MXT was to run the arrow slightly downhill. After changing the nocking point by removing and tying on a new d-loop, I made some rest modifications and shot a perfect bullet hole through paper. Walk-back tuning was a breeze, and from a distance of 30 yards, I stacked a field point, SEVR 1.5 mechanical, and a QAD Exodus fixed-blade in a dangerously tight group.

Hoyt Helix turbo compound bow being tested

During the tune-up phase, I always conduct a speed test, and the Hoyt Helix Turbo propelled my Easton FMJ 5MM shafts at 301 fps. That’s smoking for this arrow setup and the poundage I’m pulling. Note this fps rating is a far cry from the advertised 350 fps. Remember, that number is for archers shooting maximum poundage, a maximum draw length of 30 inches, and firing an arrow sporting the bare minimum GPI (grains per inch) rating.

Accuracy

I don’t pretend to be an engineer, and can’t say precisely why a bow that measures a mere 31 inches between the axles holds and balances as well as this one does. Truthfully, it doesn’t matter. The point is, the Hoyt Helix Turbo holds steady on target and that helps you shoot it more accurately. I shot field points, expandable broadheads, and fixed blades out to 80 yards and was impressed with the accuracy of this bow. No, I didn’t feel as rock-steady in a stiff breeze as I do with my 33-inch axle-to-axle Hoyt Ventum 33. And, my groups were better between 60 and 80 yards with the Ventum 33, but overall, I give this bow a nod of approval in the accuracy department.

Hoyt helix compound bow for hunting

When the pin isn’t bobbing and weaving all over the target it’s easier to relax and focus on executing a good shot. I also found that even when I bailed out of a shot early or didn’t execute to the best of my ability, the bow was forgiving. That’s impressive for the short brace height measurement. 

When an archer doesn’t have to sacrifice accuracy to get speed, it’s a win, and that’s the case with the Hoyt Helix Turbo. With a faster bow, pin gapping shrinks and those shooting single- or multi-pin moveable sights can get more yardage out of their tapes. Along with the previously mentioned arrow, this bow produced a kinetic energy rating of 93.73 foot-pounds. That’s incredible, and more than enough to bring down the largest game animals in North America.

Does the Hoyt Helix Turbo Accomplish Its Mission?

Fitted with several worthy Hoyt compound bow technologies, balanced, accurate, and fast, this hunting bow should be on your radar. Its compact size and not-too-light but not-too-heavy 4.4-pound build are perfect for the western mountains and the eastern hardwoods. It’s a do-all type of bow. At the beginning of this review, I mentioned that there are some bows I’ve tested and simply fall in love with. The Hoyt Helix Turbo is one of those bows, and I can’t wait to tote it afield this fall.

Sours: https://www.outdoorlife.com/gear/hoyt-helix-review/
Bowtech Realm SS vs Hoyt Helix - Strong Shot Archery Reviews

.

Now discussing:

.



1037 1038 1039 1040 1041