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HMH Into Literature Grade 7 Growing Bundle Digital and Print
This growing bundle includes resources made for HMH Into Literature 7th Grade. There is a large variety of activities included in this product bundle. Each activity aligns directly with HMH Into Literature for Grade 7. Topics covered include: comprehension, point of view, plot development, author's
HMH Into Literature Grade 6 Growing Bundle Digital and Print
This growing bundle includes resources made for HMH Into Literature 6th Grade. There is a large variety of activities included in this product bundle. Each activity aligns directly with HMH Into Literature for Grade 6. Topics covered include: comprehension, point of view, plot development, genre, co
"Heartbeat"--HMH Into Literature--Student Guide
One of my 7th-graders' favorite stories--grab this student guide to assess your kiddos' ability to analyze conflict, characterization, vocabulary acquisition, point of view, and use of text evidence when replying to short response questions. My students use the HMH workbook to annotate; however, I
Sours: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Search:hmh%20into%20literature

HMH Into Literature English I

Quality Review

The quality review is the result of extensive evidence gathering and analysis by Texas educators of how well instructional materials satisfy the criteria for quality in the subject-specific rubric. Follow the links below to view the scores and read the evidence used to determine quality.

Our Process

Summary of the Grade-Band Quality ReviewRead an overview of this program's product evaluation.

Overview

Section 1. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) and English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Alignment

Grade

TEKS Student % 

TEKS Teacher % 

ELPS Student % 

ELPS Teacher %

English I

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

English II

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

Section 2. Texts (what students read, see, and hear) 

  • The materials include high-quality texts across a variety of text types and genres. 
  • The materials include quantitative and qualitative analyses resulting in a grade-band categorization of texts, and they provide information about the Lexile level and text structure, language features, meaning, and knowledge demands regarding the texts found in the program. The materials include texts that are appropriately complex for the grade levels. 

Section 3. Literacy Practices and Text Interactions: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Thinking, Inquiry, and Research 

  • The materials provide students the opportunity to analyze and integrate knowledge, ideas, themes, and connections within texts using clear and concise information and well-defended text-supported claims through coherently sequenced questions and activities. 
  • The materials consistently provide students the opportunity to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
  • The materials provide a year-long plan for building academic vocabulary and include scaffolds and supports for teachers to differentiate vocabulary development for all learners.
  • The materials provide students the opportunity to develop composition skills across multiple text types for varied purposes and audiences.
  • The materials provide students consistent opportunities to listen to and speak about texts. 
  • The materials provide opportunities for students to engage in both short-term and sustained inquiry processes throughout the year and provide support to identify and summarize high-quality primary and secondary sources.

Section 4. Developing and Sustaining Foundational Literacy Skills (Grades K-5 only) 

Section 5. Supports for Diverse Learners 

  • The materials include supports for students who perform below grade level and above grade level. 
  • The materials provide support and scaffolding strategies for English Learners (ELs).

Section 6. Ease of Use and Supports for Implementation 

  • The materials include a TEKS for English Language Arts and Reading-aligned scope and sequence.
  • The materials include annotations and support for engaging students in the materials as well as annotations and ancillary materials that provide support for student learning and assistance for teachers.

Section 7. Technology, Cost, and Professional Learning Support 

  • The publisher submitted the technology, cost, and professional learning support worksheets.

Standards Alignment

Rubric Section 1

TEKS and ELPS Alignment

Percent of standards met in materials

GradeTEKS Student %TEKS Teacher %ELPS Student %ELPS Teacher %
Grade 9 100% 100% 100% 100%

Criteria for Quality

Rubric Section 2TextsWhat students read, see, and hearTotalTOTAL100% (12 out of 12 points)100%80% Recommended

Section 2TextsWhat students read, see, and hearTotal100% (12 out of 12 points)

Evaluation for 2.1
Materials include high-quality texts for ELAR instruction and cover a range of student interests.

The instructional materials include high-quality, well-crafted texts written by world-renowned authors and experts in various disciplines. The texts are content rich, and themes across the units, such as human connections, freedom, and survival, appeal to a range of student interests.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Unit 1 includes the “The Vietnam Wall” by Arizona’s poet laureate Alberto Rios. Contemporary texts are represented as well and include “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen. Unit 1 texts consider a range of student interests and would appeal to 9th-grade students. “Unusual Normality” by Ishmael Beah is about a high school student who immigrated from war-torn Sierra Leone and is trying to fit in. 

Unit 2 includes the poetry of Detroit’s poet laureate Dudley Randall, with “Booker T. and W.E.B.” Contemporary texts are represented as well and include the text “Interview with John Lewis,” a podcast interview with civil rights leader and U.S. Representative John Lewis. The informational texts found in the unit use rich, academic vocabulary and language appropriate to the disciplines they represent. For example, the nonfiction historical text Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly provides factual information, including statistics, which also appeals to student interests. 

Unit 3 presents contemporary texts, written by experts in their fields, including a scientific text about chimpanzees, “Monkey See, Monkey Do, Monkey Connect,” by Frans de Waal, trained biologist and director at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center; and the informational text “With Friends Like These…” written by psychologist Dorothy Rowe. The informational texts use rich, academic vocabulary and language appropriate to the disciplines they represent. “Monkey See, Monkey Do, Monkey Connect” contains complex, scientific vocabulary appropriate to the genre, such as synchronization, contagion, mimicry, and cognition. The texts consider a range of student interests and would appeal to 9th-grade students. 

Unit 4 contains well-known traditional and classical texts, such as William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet. The texts in this unit consider a range of student interests and would appeal to 9th-grade students. For example, there are texts about love and relationships, which students at this age can relate to; these include Diane Ackerman’s essay “Love’s Vocabulary,” and the poems “Having It Both Ways” by Elizabeth Jennings and “Superheart” by Marion Shore. 

Unit 5 includes an excerpt from Louise Erdrich’s “The Leap,” a short story with a plot that uses flashbacks; this is engaging to students. Erdrich is a contemporary author who is best known for stories representing her Native American heritage. Students also read an excerpt from Elie Wiesel’s Night, a memoir about the author’s life as a Holocaust survivor and his time spent in a concentration camp. Wiesel is a Nobel Peace Prize winner and a well-known author and human rights advocate. 
Unit 6 contains well-known traditional and classical texts, such as excerpts from Homer’s The Odyssey. The informational texts use rich, academic vocabulary and language appropriate to the disciplines they represent. In Unit 6, the excerpt from The Cruelest Journey: 600 Miles to Timbuktu by Kira Salak contains photos that document the writer’s travel experience and the cultures that she encountered, along with a map that shows the route she took.

Evaluation for 2.2
Materials include a variety of text types and genres across content that meet the requirements of the TEKS for each grade level.

The materials contain a variety of text types and genres across content that meet the requirements for English I. Literary texts included in the materials include forms such as drama, poetry, short stories, and excerpts from novels and memoirs. Informational texts include mentor texts, science texts, history texts, texts that make an argumentative claim, and other expository text types. Print and graphic features for a variety of texts are present; for example, they are included in poetry, graphic novels, informational text, and travel writing.

Examples of literary texts include but are not limited to:

“Once Upon a Time” by Nadine Gordimer (short story)
“The Vietnam Wall” by Alberto Rios (poetry)
“The Censors” by Luisa Valenzuela (short story)
“Loser” by Aimee Bender (short story)
“At Dusk” by Natasha Trethewey (poetry)
The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare (drama)
“The Leap” by Louise Erdrich (short story)
excerpt from Night by Elie Wiesel (memoir)
excerpt from The Pianist by Wladyslaw Szpilman (memoir)
excerpts from The Odyssey by Homer (poetry)

Examples of informational texts include but are not limited to:

“Unusual Normality” by Ishmael Beah (informational)
excerpt from Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly (informational)
“The Price of Freedom” by Noreen Riols (informational)
“A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen (argumentative)
“I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King, Jr. (argumentative)
“Is Survival Selfish?” by Lane Wallace (argumentative)

Examples of print and graphic features include but are not limited to:

Throughout the materials, the texts are accompanied by a variety of graphics, including photographs, paintings, digital graphics, graphic organizers, and other graphics; they also contain print features such as bolded words, titles, subtitles, and word banks. 

Examples of multimodal texts include but are not limited to: 

Saving Lincoln by Salvador Litvaki (film clip)
“Interview with John Lewis” by NPR (podcast) 
Persepolis 2 by Marjane Satrapi (graphic memoir) 
“My Shakespeare” by Kate Tempest (poem and video)

 

Evaluation for 2.3
Texts are at an appropriate level of complexity to support students at their grade level.

The materials include texts appropriately complex for English I students with a text-complexity analysis provided at the beginning of each text. The analysis clearly explains the grade-level appropriateness of the text and includes both a quantitative measure and many qualitative descriptors. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

At the introduction of each new text, a text-analysis chart is provided. Each text-complexity analysis includes a rationale for the text’s quantitative and qualitative measures. The quantitative measure is the Lexile level, while the qualitative measures feature the ideas presented, the text structures used, the language complexity, and the background knowledge required. Quantitative measures are not provided for poetry or multimodal texts. 

In Unit 2, the text Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly has a Lexile level of 1140L. Regarding ideas presented, the qualitative complexity analysis states: “Mostly explicit, but some key ideas are left implied.” Regarding text structure: “Text features help guide reading; narrative events are mostly in chronological order interspersed with information shared via cause-and-effect and main idea and details order.” Regarding language complexity: “Mostly Tier II words with some Tier III words that are specific to the areas of law or government and aircraft engineering.” Regarding the knowledge required: “Most of the background knowledge needed to understand the text is provided prior to the text or embedded within the narrative.”

The Lexile levels of texts range from 760L to 1330L. The majority of the texts fall within the 1050L–1260L range, which is ideal for 9th grade. The qualitative features reflect the skills and concepts required of 9th-grade students.

The qualitative features of the texts reflect the skills and concepts required of 9th-grade students, and the units tend to build toward more complex texts that require inferential thinking and background knowledge that is essential for understanding and that may contain more archaic, unfamiliar, or allusive language. In Unit 3, the text complexity analysis for “Monkey See, Monkey Do, Monkey Connect” states that the text contains domain-specific words and complex text structures. In Unit 4, the text complexity analysis for “The Leap” states that the text includes nonlinear plot structures and a more complex theme than fiction works in previous units. The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet and The Odyssey are both in later units, Unit 4 and Unit 6 respectively, because of their qualitative complexities. 

Rubric Section 3Literacy Practices and Text Interactions: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Thinking, Inquiry and ResearchWhat students are asked to write, speak and demonstrate.TotalTOTAL100% (45 out of 45 points)100%80% Recommended

Section 3Literacy Practices and Text Interactions: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Thinking, Inquiry and ResearchWhat students are asked to write, speak and demonstrate.Total100% (45 out of 45 points)

3.a Reading: Questions and Tasks

Evaluation for 3.a.1
Materials contain questions and tasks that support students in analyzing and integrating knowledge, ideas, themes, and connections within and across texts.

The materials contain questions and tasks that support students in analyzing and integrating knowledge, ideas, themes, and connections within and across texts. Units are organized by essential questions relating to the theme of multiple texts. Questions and tasks build conceptual knowledge and are text-dependent. The materials provide sufficient opportunities for students to discuss and answer questions about complex elements of the text. Students are asked to make connections to personal experiences, other texts, and the world around them. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, pairs of students research a cultural group and then, in small groups, discuss connections between their chosen group and the nonfiction text “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen. The questions and discussion tasks require students to make personal connections and/or text-to-text-connections to support identification and discussion of big ideas, themes, and details. Students find evidence to support the claims made in Quindlen’s writing on immigrants. The following instructions are also given: “Have group members describe how their cultural group relates to Quindlen’s claim. You may include personal connections or experiences as evidence.” Students then take the information gathered in their group discussion to “suggest ways that cultural groups become another panel of our quilt of a country.”

In Unit 2, students analyze elements of “I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King, Jr., by highlighting the claim and underlining evidence that supports the claim. Students highlight examples of “extreme language” in paragraph 7 and explain the meaning of a phrase used in that paragraph. Students underline the examples of repetition and parallelism in the speech and explain why the use of these elements is effective.

In Unit 3, students make inferences about theme as they read “The Grasshopper and the Bell Cricket” by Yasunari Kawabata. They use a graphic organizer with key topics. The students record text evidence as they read and then make inferences based on that evidence in order to write down three themes.

In Unit 4, students read Romeo and Juliet, Act 1, by William Shakespeare. Students analyze elements of drama by highlighting lines that illustrate the parallel plot of the play, examples of parallel structure in Juliet’s speech, and lines that foreshadow what will happen later in the play. In Act 3, Scene 1, students highlight the section in lines 115–122 that illustrates characterization. In the essay “Love’s Vocabulary,” students highlight the statements that show the author thinks love can be both a positive and a negative force. Students highlight examples and explain how they serve as supporting details for the thesis “Love is not easily defined.” 

In Unit 6, students use a “Response Log” as they read “Archaeology’s Tech Revolution Since Indiana Jones” by Jeremy Hsu. They determine the challenges faced by archaeologists, changes in archaeology, and what quests motivate archaeologists. As they write and discuss their answers from the text, they use and highlight the academic vocabulary words that they included in their writing. This writing task builds conceptual knowledge, requires students to cite text evidence, and integrates multiple TEKS. 

At the end of Unit 6, students reflect on the “Essential Question” and on their thoughts and opinions of the selections in the unit: “What drives us to take on a challenge? How has your answer to this question changed since you first considered it when you started this unit? What are some examples from the texts you’ve read that show the human need to seek and meet challenges?” These questions require careful reflection, the integration of text evidence, and an understanding of theme across multiple texts.

Evaluation for 3.a.2
Materials contain questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

The materials contain questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. The materials provide opportunities for students to identify the stated and implied purposes of different authors’ writing and to make inferences and draw conclusions about those purposes in a variety of texts and genres. Questions and tasks support the study of author’s craft and how the author’s choices in language influence the reader. Questions often ask students to analyze the author’s syntax and word choice and to provide specific textual evidence to support their analysis. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students answer questions that help them evaluate reasons and evidence in order to find the author’s position in the argumentative text “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen. Questions include the following: “Does the reason logically and directly support the claim? Can the facts or statistics be verified? Do the examples or anecdotes present common situations, or do they represent rare or unusual situations? Are quotations relevant and from respected sources?” These questions require students to read closely to analyze and evaluate the text’s key ideas and the author’s claims within this genre. In the next lesson, students underline the author’s italicized thoughts and then circle two details that caused those thoughts. Then, they analyze how the author’s syntax and word choice reveal his attitude and outlook. These tasks require students to study the specific language of the author and read closely to provide text evidence of their understanding. 

In Unit 2, students read an excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi. Students consider “What is the setting for this memoir? What do you think the author’s purpose is for writing it?” and analyze the text by stating how the author uses details of setting to achieve her purpose. Students compare this excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran and an excerpt from the graphic novel Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return by Marjane Satrapi. For Reading Lolita in Tehran, students consider how effective the author’s repeated use of rhetorical questions is in conveying her point of view. For Persepolis 2, students consider how the visual consistency of the narrator’s facial expression reveals the author’s point of view. Students are then asked, “What is the effect of using language only, as opposed to combining language and images? Are any aspects of the story gained by using images and/or lost by using fewer words in a graphic novel?”

In Unit 3, students read the poem “At Dusk” by Natasha Trethewey and analyze the author’s language in order to strengthen their comprehension of the poem and understand its key elements. They are asked to “make note of the author’s diction and syntax choices.” Students have an example of a chart to use to record their thoughts as they interpret “the effects of Trethewey’s diction and syntax on tone, mood, and voice.” This task supports students’ understanding, requiring them to use text evidence and to study the specific language within the text. In the “Collaborate and Compare” section, students consider how authors of different genres use different techniques to develop their genres; they compare the short story “Loser” by Aimee Bender and the poem “At Dusk” by Natasha Trethewey.

In Unit 5, the memoirs Night by Elie Wiesel and The Pianist by Wladyslaw Szpilman present first-hand experiences from the Holocaust. In a graphic organizer following the texts, students compare the author’s purpose in each text. Both texts include other characters besides the authors/narrators. Students are asked how the inclusion of other characters’ perspectives adds to the meaning of the texts. 

In Unit 6, the poem “The Journey” by Mary Oliver and the travel memoir The Cruelest Journey: Six Hundred Miles to Timbuktu by Kira Salak both convey messages about journeys. In a graphic organizer following the texts, students identify the author’s purpose in each text. In the “Analyze the Texts” section, they then describe each writer’s purpose and note how they are similar and different. In the “Collaborate and Compare” section, students use a graphic organizer to identify language in the travel memoir The Cruelest Journey: Six Hundred Miles to Timbuktu by Kira Salak and the poem “The Journey” by Mary Oliver. Suggested responses are that the travel writing includes “varied sentence structure with vivid descriptions,” and the poem includes “metaphors, personification.” Students are asked how the author uses language to effectively convey her point. 

Evaluation for 3.a.3
Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary in and across texts.

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary in and across texts. The plan includes opportunities for students to apply words in appropriate contexts. Scaffolds and supports for teachers to differentiate vocabulary development for all learners are provided.

Examples include but are not limited to:

The materials include the “Vocabulary Studio,” found in “Resources,” which is an interactive module that “provides students with instruction on key aspects of vocabulary.” The materials offer instruction and practice with ways to decipher the meaning of words that students will encounter while reading. The instruction and practice includes learning and applying knowledge and skills such as using context clues; analyzing word structure; recognizing and applying roots, prefixes, and suffixes; and practicing denotation and connotation. Vocabulary Studio lessons are suggested in the “Plan” section for most selections in the teacher’s edition. In Unit 1, for “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen, the suggested Vocabulary Studio is “Words With Multiple Meanings.” In Unit 3, for “The Grasshopper and the Bell Cricket” by Yasunari Kawabata, the suggested Vocabulary Studio is “Context Clues.” The lessons in the Studio “are arranged by skill for each grade level and provide additional support and independent practice for students,” in order to develop reading and writing skills by focusing on vocabulary comprehension skills. 

Materials include embedded supports throughout the units in both the student and teacher’s editions. “Word Gap” opportunities are available throughout each unit. Specifically, within Unit 1, students use the “Signposts” from the “Notice and Note” portion of the lesson to help them make meaning of words using context clues. 

Each unit offers students the opportunity to complete a graphic organizer with a comprehension strategy called “Word Networks,” in which students analyze a word through multiple frames, like its definition, synonyms, antonyms, and clarifying examples, in order to gain a deeper understanding of the word’s meaning and application. The graphic organizer, along with the accompanying collaborative work strategies provide a scaffolded experience for students. In Unit 2, teachers introduce academic vocabulary that relates to all of the texts in that unit. Students are encouraged to discuss the vocabulary with a partner as they complete the Word Networks. The graphic organizers and discussions help scaffold vocabulary development for diverse learners. 

The student edition supports include unit academic vocabulary overviews and prompts to reinforce students’ application of academic vocabulary in their written and spoken responses. 

In Unit 1, students preview the critical vocabulary for the Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln by matching the words to their definitions. As they come across a vocabulary word in context, they are asked questions to help them understand, analyze, and apply that word. For example, when students encounter the word conceive in the text, they “explain the relationship between a nation conceived in liberty and the reason that Lincoln was giving this speech.” 

In Unit 6, students turn to a partner and discuss the following questions after reading an excerpt from The Cruelest Journey: 600 Miles to Timbuktu by Kira Salak: “What does Salak say motivates her to choose this journey down the Niger? Is she clear about her objective? Why did Salak undertake such a dangerous journey?” Students are guided to use the academic vocabulary in their discussions. They are instructed to write out their responses before sharing with the whole class. Because students are analyzing and applying academic vocabulary through thinking, writing, speaking, and listening while reading each text selection, they are developing an understanding of the words and applying that understanding to familiar and new contexts. These embedded supports are included in every unit, which demonstrates a year-long plan. 

Evaluation for 3.a.4
Materials include a clearly defined plan to support and hold students accountable as they engage in independent reading.

The materials include a clearly defined plan to support and hold students accountable as they engage in independent reading. Procedures and/or protocols, along with support for teachers, are included to foster independent reading. A plan is provided for students to self-select text and read independently for a sustained period of time.

Examples include but are not limited to:

The procedures for independent reading are consistent for each unit: students follow guidelines to select the text(s) they want to read; students review the “Signposts” for the unit and are reminded to apply them to their independent reading; students read the self-selected text(s); and students discuss the text(s) with a partner.

The materials provide students with a process for self-selecting texts. Each “Independent Reading” section begins with a photo gallery that includes an image and tagline or hook for each selection. In Unit 4, there is a photograph of a fish swimming near a fishing lure. Under the photo is the title of the selection, “The Bass, the River, and Sheila Mant” by W.D. Wetherell, followed by the questions “What will a person sacrifice for love? Is the sacrifice always worth it?” Students are directed to read these descriptions to determine which text gets their attention, to think about which genres they enjoy reading, and to “select the text or texts that you want to read on your own.”

Each unit includes lessons for independent reading. For instance, for each of the Units 1, 2, 3, and 5, there are two days of lessons built into the curriculum for independent reading. The texts are related to, and expand upon, the themes and essential questions of the units. Students are given choices from five selections of different genres. In Unit 1, students may choose an independent reading selection from a range of genres and ability levels. The selections include but are not limited to poems, such as “Facing It” by Yusef Komunyakaa and “Theme for English B” by Langston Hughes; blogs, such as “Making the Future Better, Together” by Eboo Patel; speeches, such as “Oklahoma Bombing Memorial Address” by Bill Clinton; and short stories, such as “Night Calls” by Lisa Fugard.

The range of genres available to students fosters independent reading; students choose texts based on their interest, building lifelong reading habits. 

In the “Social-Emotional Learning” box in the “Teacher Wrap,” teachers are given suggestions for helping students set independent reading goals. In Unit 1, teachers are directed to have students set goals for reading self-selected texts outside of class. In Unit 3, students are encouraged to create a plan for reading self-selected texts. In Unit 5, students are encouraged to select a text that may seem more challenging.

The materials include access to a “Reading Studio,” found in “Online Resources.” These resources are available to students and target reading skills relevant to those needed to access texts within each unit. These learning modules reinforce skills students are learning through the curriculum, such as to “Notice and Note,” “Collaborate and Share,” and use logs to track reading progress and reading comprehension. In Unit 5, for the “Signpost” (reading techniques specific to each unit) of “Contradiction and Comparison,” students are given the anchor question for “The Leap” by Louise Erdrich: “Why did the character act that way?” The materials contain an online digital library with access to over 100 full-length digital novels. Students can preview these novels and choose a selection based on their interest. There is a sidebar tool that allows students to make notes while reading and highlighting the text. 

Materials include a professional learning component to help teachers implement the independent reading lessons for each unit. This resource provides teachers with an overview of the independent reading lesson elements, and of the resources students can access to enhance their independent reading experience. 

The teacher's edition reminds teachers that “Independent Reading” sections are only available in the e-book and list selections.

The materials offer several options for accountability. Teachers encourage students to use their “Notice and Note Signpost” strategy as they read and mark their thinking in the notes section or to share their thoughts about their independent reading with others. At the end of each “Independent Reading” section, students discuss what they read with a partner. The same four “Collaborate and Share” tasks are provided for each unit: Students (1) summarize the text, (2) describe and explain “Signposts” they notice in the text, (3) describe what they enjoyed/found challenging about the text, and (4) provide a recommendation/evaluation of the text. There are also selection tests available that ask multiple-choice questions, technology-enhanced questions, and constructed-response questions. 

3.b Writing

Evaluation for 3.b.1
Materials provide support for students to develop writing skills across multiple text types for a variety of purposes and audiences.

The materials provide support for students to develop writing skills across multiple text types for a variety of purposes and audiences. Students are given opportunities to write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. The materials provide opportunities for students to write informational texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are provided opportunities to write argumentative texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students write correspondence in a professional or friendly structure. The materials provide opportunities to write literary and/or rhetorical analyses.

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students read “Once Upon a Time” by Nadine Gordimer and create a modern fairy tale using given guidance on writing narratives. 

At the end of Unit 2, students write a three- to four-paragraph argumentative essay about whether or not graphic novels are an important genre. They are reminded to base their opinions on evidence. Formatting suggestions are given for what to discuss in each paragraph. Sentence frames are provided for English Learner support.

In Unit 3, students receive a literary prompt: “Write a short story about an event that reveals something about how we connect with each other.” They have a mentor text as an example and are encouraged to use their “Response Log” notes from the unit. The writing prompt has a “Read, Think, Write” format with a checklist of guidelines, such as “begin by introducing a setting, a narrator, and a main character” and “include sensory language and descriptive details.” 

In Unit 3, students write an informal letter to a character from the text “The Grasshopper and Bell Cricket” by Yasunari Kawabata. They describe the results of their research on Japanese art forms and pose questions to the characters. Guidelines are given on how to write a greeting, how to organize the body of the letter, and how to write a concluding paragraph.

 In Unit 4, students read “The Price of Freedom” by Noreen Riols. In the “Create and Discuss” section, students write a professional letter in which they express interest in working for an agency that they have researched. Students go to the “Writing Studio” for guidance on formal writing (which is found in the “Writing Informative Texts Studio”).

At the end of Unit 5, students are introduced to argumentative writing again, and the thesis statement is reviewed as well as how to write claims and counterclaims. Students receive a writing prompt that has them read the quote “Survival may be instinctive, but it is not simple.” They then think carefully about the question “What does it take to survive in a crisis?” After these steps, they write an argument essay stating their opinion on the question “Does survival require selfishness?” A mentor text is provided along with supports and scaffolds for each phase of the writing process. 

At the end of Unit 6, teachers are directed to review the elements of a strong explanatory essay. Students then write an essay about how “an activity described in one of the unit selections meets the human need for challenge.” A mentor text is provided along with several student supports, such as sentence frames, a graphic organizer for planning, a revision checklist, an editing checklist, and a scoring rubric.

3.b.2
Most written tasks require students to use clear and concise information and well- defended text-supported claims to demonstrate the knowledge gained through analysis and synthesis of texts.

See Quality Review Evidence for this Indicator

Evaluation for 3.b.2
Most written tasks require students to use clear and concise information and well- defended text-supported claims to demonstrate the knowledge gained through analysis and synthesis of texts.

Most written tasks require students to use clear and concise information and well-defended text-supported claims to demonstrate knowledge gained through the analysis and synthesis of texts. Students are provided opportunities to use evidence from texts to support their opinions and claims. Students demonstrate, in writing, what they have learned through reading and listening to texts.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Each text selection ends with a section where students analyze the text and support their responses with evidence from the text. For example, in Unit 1, for “Unusual Normality” by Ishmael Beah, students are explicitly asked to provide evidence from the text for four of the five questions. One question asks: “How does the text structure—a personal essay—enable the author to deliver his message effectively? Explain your answer using examples from the text.” 

In Unit 3, students write about how the story “Loser” by Aimee Bender explores different themes. First, students write their opinion on how the theme connects to human nature and life, and then they write about how the theme connects to the story. 

In Unit 5, when reading “The End and the Beginning” by Wislawa Szymborska, students analyze the tone of the poem by responding to three sub-questions, citing words and phrases from the poem to support their answers.

In Unit 6, after reading The Odyssey, students write a narrative about an event from the text. They write from the point of view of a character in the text other than Odysseus, demonstrating their comprehension through writing. 

At the end of each unit, students complete a summative writing task that is based on the readings from the unit. In Unit 5, students write an argument on whether survival requires selfishness, using evidence from at least two texts read in the unit. In the “Plan” section of the task, students receive a graphic organizer: “Use the word web below to help you explore your thoughts and feelings about survival. Include ideas from the unit texts.” Students are also encouraged to use their “Reading Response Logs” from the unit when planning their argument. In Unit 6, students produce an explanatory essay with a thesis, supporting ideas, and evidence gathered from sources encountered throughout the unit.

The materials also provide multiple opportunities for brief written responses to text, including annotations, response logs, and graphic organizers. The materials include room for margin annotations related to specific strategies learned in the unit. For example, in Unit 1, students note the author’s purpose, voice, and tone in the text as they read “Unusual Normality” by Ishmael Beah. The materials also include response logs throughout the unit, in which students respond to the “Essential Question” by adding notes and information from each text. The notes from the texts are later used to write an essay. The materials often ask students to make notes as they read and record their thoughts in graphic organizers and charts. For example, in Unit 6, students make notes in a chart about poetic elements they find throughout The Odyssey by Homer

 

3.b.3
Over the course of the year, writing skills and knowledge of conventions are applied in increasingly complex contexts, with opportunities for students to publish their writing.

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Evaluation for 3.b.3
Over the course of the year, writing skills and knowledge of conventions are applied in increasingly complex contexts, with opportunities for students to publish their writing.

Writing skills and knowledge of conventions are applied in increasingly complex contexts over the course of the year, with opportunities for students to publish their writing. The materials facilitate students’ coherent use of the elements of the writing process. Opportunities are provided for the practice and application of the conventions of academic language, including punctuation and grammar, when speaking and writing. Grammar, punctuation, and usage are taught systematically, both in and out of context, and grow in depth and complexity within and across units.

Examples include but are not limited to:

There is a writing task at the end of each unit that guides students through the full writing process (plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish). 

For example, in Unit 1, students write a personal essay about how differences between people can be opportunities rather than obstacles. In the planning stage, students reflect on the unit’s readings and use two provided graphic organizers to brainstorm personal experiences or events and organize their ideas into a topic statement, three body paragraphs, and conclusion. In the drafting stage, students analyze author’s craft and genre characteristics in the mentor text for Unit 1, the essay “Unusual Normality” by Ishmael Beah, and apply these elements to their own writing. In the revising stage, students use a revision guide to make necessary changes to their writing. In the editing stage, students edit their papers for passive voice. 

Additionally, in Unit 3, the summative writing task asks the students to write a short story about an event that reveals something about how people connect with others. A plot element chart is used to help them plan and organize ideas. In the drafting stage, students analyze the descriptive and sensory details in the mentor text “Loser” by Aimee Bender and add these elements to their own draft. The revision process has them evaluate their writing with a partner using a revision guide. In the editing stage, students edit their drafts for standard English conventions and focus on spelling plural nouns correctly. The draft is then published and presented. A scoring guide is available for teacher and student use.

Most reading selections include a “Language Conventions” focus in which punctuation and grammar are addressed. After analyzing the targeted elements of grammar in the selection, students apply the grammar skills to their own writing. For example, in Unit 2, students learn about pronoun-antecedent agreement and apply what they learned when writing a paragraph about the women described in Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly. In Unit 5, students learn about how to use punctuation as a guide for phrasing. Students practice reading paragraphs aloud from “The Leap” by Louise Eldrich, paying attention to punctuation cues, and discuss with a partner the author’s use of relative clauses. In the “Language Conventions” activity that follows “The Leap,” students apply their knowledge of relative clauses to the research summary that they wrote about circus-related terms found in the selection, and discuss with a partner the author’s use of relative clauses in the text.

The materials include a “Grammar Studio” that provides direct instruction and practice opportunities for grammar. Modules focus on topics such as agreement, capital letters, parts of speech, and punctuation. Specific grammatical structures or skills from the modules are tagged to reading selections that contain strong examples. For example, in Unit 1, students read “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen, analyze the author’s use of noun clauses, and then write original sentences with noun clauses. In Unit 4, students read “The Price of Freedom” by Noreen Riols, analyze sentence variety in the text, and write a short passage about a topic of interest in which they include a variety of sentence structures.

The materials also provide resources on grammar and punctuation during the editing stage of each unit’s summative writing task. The student edition includes definitions and expectations for conventions, as well as resources for students to evaluate their use of conventions. The teacher’s edition includes strategies for teachers to instruct students on how to evaluate their writing for use of conventions, including grammar checklists and peer reviewing. 
 

3.c Speaking and Listening

Evaluation for 3.c.1
Materials support students’ listening and speaking about texts.

The materials support students’ listening and speaking about texts by providing opportunities that are focused on the text(s) being studied in class, allowing students to demonstrate comprehension. Oral tasks require students to use clear and concise information and well-defended text-supported claims to demonstrate knowledge gained through the analysis and synthesis of texts. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students discuss specific text-based questions in groups. While reading “Unusual Normality” by Ishmael Beah, students “express their ideas about Beah’s decision to keep his childhood experiences a secret.” When students reconvene as a class, they share some of their examples. This oral task requires students to use information gained from reading the text to support their claim and demonstrate their analysis of a character’s motive. In “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen, students watch a “Close Read Screencast” in which two students discuss ideas expressed in paragraphs 3 and 7. In the “Teacher Wrap,” teachers are advised to have students watch this screencast, then have students work with a partner to closely read and discuss paragraph 8.

In Unit 2, for Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi, several discussion questions are included in the “Teacher Wrap” to allow students to demonstrate their comprehension of the text. Students are asked, “What rules did the government impose on women and girls after the Iranian Revolution?” and “Why would it be difficult for women to convert to the thinking of the Iranian government?” Students also discuss how the regime’s laws made personal histories irrelevant.

In Unit 3, students read “Loser” by Aimee Bender and analyze and discuss the themes present. After students free write their ideas, they discuss in a small group. They receive a graphic organizer during the discussion to record their group’s themes and supporting details. Students create discussion questions about the story that they pose to their group. Question stems include “Why did the author…?” and “What was the young man’s attitude toward…?” Students are reminded to support their responses to the discussion questions with text evidence. This activity gives students the opportunity to speak and listen while demonstrating their understanding of the text. 

In Unit 5, after reading “The Leap” by Louise Erdrich, students create a timeline of events from the story and respond to the question “What do these events tell us about the narrator and her mother?” Students are instructed to skim the selection for details to support their thinking. With a partner, students then discuss their ideas and the information they found in the selection to support them. Pairs share their discussed ideas with the class. Students also engage with the poem “The End and the Beginning” by Wisława Szymborska; they cite evidence “to support analysis of poetic language and structure.” For the Night and Pianist readings, students use research in the “Create and Present” post-reading activities to expand one of the readings’ background paragraphs. Students share information during this activity, then create their own background paragraphs for one of the two memoirs. Then, students reflect, as a group, on how they incorporated the research in different ways. Students engage in a collaborative discussion to respond to the question “How do the different introductions provide the reader with helpful context?” 

Evaluation for 3.c.2
Materials engage students in productive teamwork and student-led discussions, in both formal and informal settings.

The materials engage students in productive teamwork and student-led discussions, in both formal and informal settings. Grade-level protocols for discussion are provided. Students have opportunities to give organized presentations/performances and speak in a clear and concise manner using the conventions of language.

Examples include but are not limited to:

The materials provide a “Speaking and Listening Studio” that explains how to collaborate effectively and how to give an effective presentation. The Studio discusses establishing and following procedures and explains how to speak constructively, as well as how to listen and respond thoughtfully. Guidelines and protocols for discussions and presentations are thoroughly detailed. Within the Studio, there are multiple video examples and sound clips, and each section has activities and quizzes that allow students to check their understanding. In Unit 1, “Participating in Collaborative Discussions,” students learn the protocols for collaborative discussions. In Module 2 of this unit, “Participating in Collaborative Discussions: Introduction,” students learn what all participants do in a collaborative discussion, including “actively participate, listen to one another, build on each other’s ideas, stay on topic, and achieve discussion goals together.” Students listen to a recording of a collaborative discussion and follow along with a transcript of the discussion. The recording and transcript are broken into sections. Students evaluate a specific element of collaborative discussions after each section. 

In Unit 2, materials prompt students to work in small groups to “create a multimedia presentation about one aspect of Lewis’s career,” then present it to the class or post it online, in response to the “Interview with John Lewis” reading selection. While creating their presentation, materials prompt students: “Choose language that suits your topic and purpose. Then, practice your presentation, noting when you should pause or change the volume of your voice for effect.” To support students with presentation skills, the materials provide teachers and students with sidebars that direct students to the Speaking and Listening Studio, in which students can find interactive lessons addressing “Analyzing and Evaluating Presentations,” “Giving Presentations,” and “Using Media in a Presentation.” 

In Unit 3, students read and respond to “Monkey See, Monkey Do, Monkey Connect” by Frans de Waal in small groups. The text explicitly describes the instructional strategy of “reciprocal teaching”: the teacher provides a list of generic question stems, the students work independently to create questions about the text, groups present their questions to each other for discussion, and students answer questions with evidence from the text. Additionally, the strategy of a three-minute review is explained: the teacher first facilitates a whole-class discussion about the author’s claim; students work for three minutes to answer whether the author presented valid reasons and had enough support for his claim; then, student partners review the selection and write clarifying questions; finally, partners share their thoughts with the class. Varying instructional strategies provided at the beginning of each selection give guidance and practice with grade-level protocols for discussion in which students express their thinking.

In Unit 4, students engage in “a formal panel discussion” to present the findings and key points from each small group’s discussion. Representatives from each small group are directed: “[U]se appropriate register (degree of formality), tone, speaking rate, volume, and enunciation. Speakers should also use technical language effectively and follow language conventions. As they present, speakers should make eye contact and use purposeful gestures.” To support students with presentation skills, the materials provide teachers and students with sidebars that direct students to a Speaking and Listening Studio, in which students can find interactive lessons addressing “Analyzing and Evaluating Presentations” and “Giving Presentations.” 

In Unit 5, students write an argument about their position on whether survival requires selfishness. They then practice presenting their adapted argument with a partner or group before giving the presentation to the class. Effective verbal and nonverbal techniques are explained, including enunciation, voice modulation, pitch, speaking rate, volume, eye contact, facial expressions, and gestures. The materials provide advice on what an audience and presenter should look and sound like for listeners and presenters.

In Unit 6, students participate in a collaborative discussion using their essay as the basis for their discussion. Teachers provide students with a graphic organizer where students can collect notes on other speakers’ key points and evidence. Teachers introduce students to the task by describing the characteristics of an effective collaborative discussion, reminding students to ask for clarification when they are confused and to participate actively and constructively.

3.d Inquiry and Research

3.d.1
Materials engage students in both short-term and sustained recursive inquiry processes to confront and analyze various aspects of a topic using relevant sources.

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Evaluation for 3.d.1
Materials engage students in both short-term and sustained recursive inquiry processes to confront and analyze various aspects of a topic using relevant sources.

The materials engage students in both short-term and sustained recursive inquiry processes to confront and analyze various aspects of a topic using relevant sources. Materials support identification and summary of high-quality primary and secondary sources. Students practice organizing and presenting their ideas and information in accordance with the purpose of the research and the appropriate grade-level audience.

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students engage with both primary and secondary resources as they conduct short-term and sustained inquiry to research and analyze aspects of various topics. For example, after reading “Once Upon A Time” by Nadine Gordimer, students research well-known fairy tales, write a summary of each noting their structure and characteristics, and cite their sources. After reading “The Vietnam Wall” by Alberto Rios, students research the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and people’s reactions to it, as they analyze the memorial’s impact. They are reminded to use only reputable sources (sites the teacher recommends or those ending in .edu, .org, or .gov). Students then read the Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln and conduct research about the audience of the speech; they are reminded to use valid, reliable sources. Then, students engage with a secondary source, a film clip from Salvado Litvak’s Saving Lincoln, which is based on letters and journals from Lincoln and his bodyguard. Students synthesize information from both accounts to deepen their understanding.

In Unit 2, students listen to an excerpt from an NPR podcast episode, “Interview with John Lewis,” and then research more about John Lewis and his accomplishments. Students use a graphic organizer to record his achievements and their effects, create a multimedia presentation about one aspect of Lewis’s career, and present it to the class or post it online. Also in Unit 2, students read Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran and “research modern Iranian politics, society, and culture based on information from two or three reliable websites” to find out how the Iranian government and society may have changed since the time when the memoir was written. Students list at least two online sources with relevant notes; materials give a research tip to check the reliability and credibility of sources of information by starting with well-known news organizations. 

In Unit 3, students read “With Friends Like These…” by Dorothy Rowe and research friendship and neuroscience. Students “look for sources geared toward a general audience,” like newspaper articles and books. 

In Unit 4, students read Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet and research three adaptations—“songs, poems, plays, visual works of art, or musicals”—to note similarities and differences between the adaptations and the original text. Students also locate and conduct research on an interview with an artist who based their work on a Shakespeare play. 

In Unit 5, students read “The Leap” by Louise Erdich and conduct their own research on traditional circuses, including finding images of vintage circuses and circus-related terms. Students record their research in a chart and write a four- to five-paragraph research summary that they present in a small-group discussion. Also in Unit 5, students read Lane Wallace’s “Is Survival Selfish?” and work in partners to research stories of survivors. Materials provide students with a research tip to research topics related to their topic and expand their search to include other aspects if they are having difficulty finding enough information on their topic. Students cite sources and check for the accuracy of their quotations, in keeping with ethical research practices.

In Unit 6 of the “Writing Studio,” students learn about conducting research, including how to start the process, how to identify and locate sources, how to conduct field research or internet research, how to take notes, and how to give credit to sources used. The materials provide an explicit definition of primary and secondary sources and include multiple examples with pictures. Each example has an explanation of why a source is primary or secondary. The Studio also explains why to use a primary source and how to match sources to research questions. Unit 7 of the Writing Studio is titled “Evaluating Sources” and covers choosing sources for quality, usefulness, and reliability. This unit describes how a reliable source should be “current, credible, accurate, objective, unbiased, and presented well.”  

In Unit 6, students write an explanatory essay for the summative writing task. As students read various texts throughout the unit, such as The Odyssey by Homer, “Archaeology’s Tech Revolution Since Indiana Jones” by Jeremy Hsu, The Cruelest Journey: 600 Miles to Timbuktu by Kira Salak, and the poem “The Journey” by Mary Oliver, the materials direct students to make annotations about “Numbers and Stats,” “Contrasts and Contradictions,” internal conflict, and how authors use repetition. When developing their drafts of their summative writing task, students synthesize their notes and research in order to support and develop their claim for their essay.

3.e Integration of ELAR Skills

Evaluation for 3.e.1
Materials contain interconnected tasks that build student knowledge and provide opportunities for increased independence.

The materials contain interconnected tasks that build student knowledge and provide opportunities for increased independence. Questions and tasks are designed to help students build and apply knowledge and skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, thinking, and language. Text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas within individual texts as well as across multiple texts are included in the materials. Tasks integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening, and thinking and include components of vocabulary, syntax, and fluency.

Evidence includes but is not limited to:

In Unit 1, students prepare to read “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen by discussing things that represent America to them. Then, they analyze the parts of an argument that they will be seeing within the text, such as claim, evidence, counterargument, and concession. They receive a graphic organizer to use while reading that will help them evaluate Quindlen’s claims; in the organizer, students write down reasons/evidence from the text and how the reasons/evidence support the claim. The materials also provide students with instruction on an annotation strategy called “Word Gaps.” Students underline unfamiliar words, then look for context clues to help them define the unfamiliar words. Later in the unit, Nadine Gordimer’s “Once Upon a Time” is followed by “Analyze the Text” questions, to which students must respond by using evidence from the text. Students are asked, “What is the theme of the story? Explain how Gordimer develops this theme through the story’s setting.” In the “Create and Present” activity, students apply writing skills by writing a fairy tale with a partner; they apply speaking and listening skills by presenting their fairy tale in a recording or by reading it aloud to the class.

In Unit 2, students collaborate and compare across genres. After reading Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return by Marjane Satrapi and an excerpt from Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi, students discuss the common elements in the two stories and take notes in a chart. They discuss, think, and write about the author’s purpose, message, and language used. Then, students write about their own personal reactions. Specific text-dependent questions guide group discussion, including “How is the way the authors communicate with readers similar and different in the texts? What is the effect of using language only, as opposed to combining language and images? Are any aspects of the story gained by using images and/or lost by using fewer words in a graphic novel? What have you learned from these sources together about the status of women in Iran since the Iranian Revolution?” For the end-of-unit “Writing Task,” students apply writing skills by writing a research report about an event, person, or group of people connected to the struggle for freedom, which is the unit theme. Students also revisit the mentor text from the unit, Margot Lee Shetterly’s Hidden Figures, to analyze author’s craft. Students read the author’s thesis statement and note the author’s precise use of language, then apply what they have learned to their own research report. Students apply speaking and listening skills by participating in a peer review of their drafts. Students are reminded to “listen carefully and take notes” as their partners provide feedback. 

In Unit 4, students read “Having It Both Ways” by Elizabeth Jennings and “Superheart” by Marion Shore, with the objective of comparing elements of both poems. The materials provide students with instruction on making connections while reading. Materials reinforce two “Notice and Note” annotation strategies: “Contrast and Contradictions” and “Word Gaps.” In groups, students discuss the poems and the messages conveyed and then create “a visual response to the messages that society communicates to us about love and relationships.” When they locate five images, they write what each image says and explain why they chose it. While writing and discussing what they learned from the poems, they use a checklist on which they check off the unit’s academic vocabulary as they use it. After students finish reading each poem, materials prompt students to complete a “Check for Understanding” section, which is used to help students and teachers ensure comprehension of each poem. These questions reinforce the “Connect Ideas” and “Notice and Note” prompts students were given during their reading. In the post-reading activity, students answer text-based questions: “What message do you think the author of ‘Superheart’ is trying to communicate by combining the sonnet form with a modern-day pop-culture allusion, or reference, to Superman?” and “The author of ‘Having It Both Ways’ uses we and our as she describes contrary desires for romantic love and independence. What is the effect of this choice on the sonnet’s tone?” The materials extend these types of questions and tasks to multiple texts when students “find at least three other sonnets,” then compare the prosody of these poems to the two focus readings. Materials further prompt students to identify the theme for all five poems and record responses in a graphic organizer.

In Unit 6, for the end-of-unit “Writing Task,” students apply writing skills by writing an explanatory essay about “how an activity described in one of the unit selections meets the human need for challenge.” This task requires students to base their writing on one of the readings from the unit. Students are directed to the “Developing a Topic” module and the “Formal Style” module of the “Writing Informative Texts” unit in the “Writing Studio.” The materials integrate reading skills by reminding students to review the “Response Log” that they completed as they read the selections of the unit and go to the “Reading Studio” for resources on “Notice and Note” reading strategies. Students also revisit the mentor text from the unit, Jeremy Hsu’s “Archeology’s Tech Revolution Since Indiana Jones,” to analyze author’s craft. Students note the author’s use of narrative structures and evidence and apply what they have learned to their own explanatory essay. Students apply speaking and listening skills by participating in a peer review of their drafts. Students are reminded to describe specific revision suggestions in their discussions.

Evaluation for 3.e.2
Materials provide spiraling and scaffolded practice.

The materials provide spiraling and scaffolded practice by supporting distributed practice over the course of the year, including scaffolds for students to demonstrate integration of literacy skills that spiral over the school year.

Evidence includes but is not limited to:

The materials provide students with multiple opportunities to practice writing similar texts throughout the units; for example, students have multiple and varied opportunities to write research reports. 

In Unit 1, students write research for their post-reading activities: they are prompted to write a summarizing report for “Unusual Normality” by Ishmael Beah, they research fairy tales, and they research the Vietnam Memorial. In Unit 2, students extend the Unit 1 practice of writing research: students write a research report as this unit’s summative writing task. Research is reinforced in Unit 3, when students research friendship and neuroscience in the “Research” post-reading activity for Dorothy Rowe’s “With Friends Like These….” In Unit 4, students read William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet and research three adaptations, noting similarities and differences between the adaptations and the original text. In Unit 5, students write a research summary after reading “The Leap” by Lousie Erdrich. These many opportunities to conduct text-based research and to write research texts such as research summaries and reports give students distributed practice with a literacy skill in a systematic way throughout the year. 

Students learn “Notice and Note” strategies (“Contrasts and Contradictions,” “Aha Moment,” “Tough Questions,” “Words of the Wiser,” “Again and Again,” “Memory Moment,” “Extreme or Absolute Language,” “Numbers and Stats,” “Quoted Words,” “Word Gaps”) to support them in analyzing the texts they encounter throughout the year. In Unit 1, students read “A Quilt of a Country” by Anna Quindlen. Students use “Notice and Note” strategies during their reading as an annotation method. For the Quindlen text, these annotations include “Contradictory Language” and “Word Gaps.” Students look for phrases or language within the text that demonstrate a contrast or contradiction; then, they identify the contrast or contradiction and ask themselves why it matters. Students also underline unfamiliar words for the “Word Gap” strategy; then, they look for context clues to help them define the unfamiliar words. In Unit 4, students encounter the “Notice and Note” strategy “Numbers and Stats”; they are instructed to pay attention to when the author uses numbers and statistics when reading “The Price of Freedom” by Noreen Riols. This support helps them make inferences and draw conclusions. They apply the “Signpost” strategy to Riol’s text first, and then to other texts throughout the curriculum. In Unit 5, students are instructed to use the “Notice and Note” strategies “Memory Moment,” “Again and Again,” and “Contrast and Contradictions,” while reading “The Leap” by Louise Erdrich. Then, they are prompted to use this information to respond to the unit’s “Essential Question.” 

The “Studios” for writing, vocabulary, reading, grammar, and speaking and listening provide students with the option for additional interactive practice focused on targeted instruction. The “Writing Task” for Unit 1 is a personal essay. In the digital student edition, links to the appropriate Studio are embedded at the point of use. In the assignment overview, students are directed to the “Writing Informative Texts: Overview” module in the “Writing Studio” for help writing the essay. In the “Plan” stage of the essay, students are directed to the “Planning and Drafting” module. They are also reminded to apply what they learned about the features of this type of writing and are directed to the “Reading Studio” for more resources on these strategies. In the “Revise” stage of the essay, students are directed to the “Revising and Editing” module in the “Writing as a Process” unit of the Writing Studio. Students are directed to the “Active and Passive Voice” module in the “Grammar Studio” for help with editing. In Unit 3, for Frans de Waal’s “Monkey See, Monkey Do, Monkey Connect,” the “When Students Struggle” section in the “Teacher Wrap” provides a breakdown of the difference between reasons and evidence in an argumentative text: “Reasons usually answer the question ‘why’ and evidence should answer the question ‘how,’ or ‘what proof is there?’” The materials also suggest that students go to the Reading Studio, and that teachers assign the “Level Up Tutorial: Evidence,” if students need additional support. For Unit 5, in the “Speaking and Listening Task,” students adapt the argument that they wrote in the “Writing Task” as a formal oral presentation. Students are directed to the “Giving a Presentation” module in the “Speaking and Listening Studio” for help planning their presentation.

Rubric Section 4Developing and Sustaining Foundational Literacy SkillsGrades 3-5 OnlyNot applicable for this grade level.

Rubric Section 5Supports for All LearnersHow well do the materials support teachers in meeting the needs of students with diverse learning needs?TotalTOTAL100% (6 out of 6 points)100%80% Recommended

Section 5Supports for All LearnersHow well do the materials support teachers in meeting the needs of students with diverse learning needs?Total100% (6 out of 6 points)

Evaluation for 5.1
Materials include supports for students who demonstrate proficiency above grade level.

The materials include supports for students who demonstrate proficiency above grade level. Planning and learning opportunities, including extensions and differentiation, are provided for students who demonstrate literacy skills above that expected at the grade level.

Evidence includes but is not limited to:

In Unit 1, students read “A Quilt of a Country,” an argumentative text by Anna Quindlen. The “To Challenge Students” section of the teacher’s edition includes an extension for students to analyze rhetoric by identifying rhetorical devices (for example, rhetorical questions, repetition, and parallelism) and discuss their impact with a partner. The teacher materials also include an “Extend” activity, in which students work in peer groups to create a “list of qualities that help immigrants to succeed”; this activity builds upon the research students conduct on a cultural group within the United States. Students also read “Unusual Normality,” a personal essay by Ishmael Beah. The “To Challenge Students” section of the teacher’s edition includes an extension activity: In small groups, students can explore the author’s decisions and discuss guiding questions such as “What are some reasons Beah listens to his classmates and does not share his own experiences? Do you think it will bridge differences between Beah and his classmates if he speaks openly? Why or why not?”

In Unit 4, students read The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. The “To Challenge Students” section of the teacher’s edition includes an extension activity: Review Scene 4 and discuss its function. The teacher prompts students: “Is Scene 4 merely an amusing digression, or does it fulfill a greater purpose?” In small groups, students discuss how the scene might contribute to the understanding of a character, how the speeches and interactions might express important themes, how the scene affects the pacing of the play, and how the scene conveys mood. 

In Unit 5, students read “The Leap,” a short story by Louise Erdich. The “To Challenge Students” section of the teacher’s edition offers an extension activity: Interpret point of view by rewriting the scene where the mother rescues the daughter from the house, using first-person narration from the mother’s point of view or third-person, omniscient voice. Students share and compare their finished narratives; they discuss the new connections they made to the story by changing the point of view. After students have finished reading Homer’s The Odyssey, they conduct research by finding and listening to two audio recordings of the epic, paying attention to the poetic elements and speaking techniques used in these audio recordings. An “Extend” activity prompts students to use their research to create their own audio recording. 

In Unit 6, students read an excerpt from The Cruelest Journey: 600 Miles to Timbuktu,a travel memoir by Kira Salak. In the “To Challenge Students” section of the teacher’s edition, an extension activity has students reflect on their own personal motivations and compare them to the author’s motivations; students consider what challenges motivate them to succeed. Students can then write a personal essay in which they describe their motivators for accepting challenges and make connections to Salak’s actions in the text. Students include “at least one example of an experience in which this motivation played a large role and the outcome of that experience, including whether they learned something in the process.”

Evaluation for 5.2
Materials include supports for students who perform below grade level to ensure they are meeting the grade-level literacy standards.

The materials include supports for students who perform below grade level to ensure they are meeting the grade-level literacy standards. Planning and learning opportunities, including extensions and differentiation, are provided for students who demonstrate literacy skills below that expected at the grade level.

Examples include but are not limited to:

In the “Teacher Wrap” for each selection, there is a box labeled “When Students Struggle,” which presents suggestions for helping students demonstrating proficiency below grade level. In addition, materials include the “Reading Studio,” an online resource that includes targeted lessons on reading fluency and reading comprehension instruction. 

In Unit 1, students read “A Quilt of a Country,” an argumentative text by Anna Quindlen. In the “When Students Struggle” section of the teacher’s edition, the materials suggest students can analyze arguments by using a chart to identify evidence that supports the author’s claim. Students may work with a partner or individually to find evidence. They are also directed to the Reading Studio’s “Level Up Tutorial: Analyzing Arguments” for additional support. 

In Unit 2, for “I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King, Jr., the materials include a section in the teacher’s edition for “When Students Struggle,” which targets students who “struggle to notice signposts.” The strategies that the materials provide are meant to help these students “instill the habits of slowing down, rereading, taking notes, and questioning,” skills that are applied when students are successfully employing the “Notice and Note Signposts” reading strategies. The materials also provide a second “When Students Struggle” for the same reading to help students analyze figurative language. Students can also be assigned a “Level Up Tutorial: Figurative Language” from the Reading Studio. 

In Unit 4, students read The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. In the “When Students Struggle” section of the teacher’s edition, support suggestions include students summarizing a scene. Volunteers are asked to represent characters in the scene and act out what is taking place, while reading the lines. Students can then work with a partner to write a brief summary of what took place in the scene and how it helped them understand more about the feud between the two families. During the reading of this text, teachers are also advised to guide students performing below grade level to analyze plot by noting that Tybalt’s death is a turning point in the play. Teachers draw a simple plot diagram with Tybalt’s death at the peak. Students then predict what will probably happen after Tybalt’s death. For additional support, teachers can use the Reading Studio and assign the “Level Up Tutorial” on “Plot Stages.” Another support offered later in the unit supports students in analyzing the cause-and-effect relationships driving the plot in the play. They work with a partner to create a chart, mapping the cause and effect from Scene 1 and Scene 2. Students add to their charts as they read further. For additional support, it is noted that teachers can assign students to go to the Reading Studio’s “Level Up Tutorial: Plot: Sequence of Events.” 

In Unit 5, in the lesson focused on the poem “The End and the Beginning” by Wislawa Szymborska, the materials include a section for “When Students Struggle,” which targets students who struggle with identifying the tone of an author from the author’s diction. The strategies that the materials provide support students in relating diction to tone. Strategies include re-reading, employing graphic organizers, and using a scaffolded reading analysis process. The materials provide teachers with additional support resources and direct teachers to assign students the “Level Up Tutorial: Tone” from the Reading Studio. 

In Unit 6, students read “Archaeology’s Tech Revolution Since Indiana Jones” by Jeremy Hsu. In the “When Students Struggle” section of the teacher’s edition, a support for students demonstrating proficiency below grade level is to use a graphic organizer for analyzing technical texts. Students draw conclusions from the information they have recorded. They are asked to return to the thesis they identified at the beginning of the selection and look for a direct or indirect restatement of the thesis in the final section. For additional support, students are directed to the Reading Studio’s “Level Up Tutorial: Drawing Conclusions.”

Evaluation for 5.3
Materials include supports for English Learners (EL) to meet grade-level learning expectations.

The materials include supports for English Learners (ELs) to meet grade-level learning expectations. Accommodations for linguistics commensurate with various levels of English language proficiency as defined by the ELPS are included. Materials provide various scaffolds, such as Spanish translations of essential components of each unit and cognates for unit vocabulary. Students are encouraged to use their first language as a means to linguistic, affective, cognitive, and academic development in English. Vocabulary is developed in the context of connected discourse.

Examples include but are not limited to:

A “Text X-Ray: ELPS Support” section precedes each text selection. According to the description provided, the Text X-Ray “provides support for the four domains of English language development addressed in the English Language Proficiency Standards.” The materials provide pre-reading strategies, cultural resources, and instructional strategies designed to target the different domains of the English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) (listening, speaking, writing, and reading) through domain-specific content boxes targeted toward a specific ELPS proficiency level. 

The “Reading Studio” includes Spanish translations for essential questions, reading response logs, academic vocabulary, and summaries for each selection. 

In Unit 1, for the text “The Vietnam War” by Alberto Rios, the “Text X-Ray: ELPS Support” for “Listening” suggests ELs at the “Beginning” level read sections of the poem aloud with a partner to understand the central idea. To guide discussion, the materials provide sentence frames such as “The author is showing us…. This represents….” The materials suggest “Advanced” ELs summarize their thoughts on the poem’s central idea and then explain to a partner what language in the poem led them to their conclusion. To guide discussion, the materials provide sentence frames such as “When the author says…, it makes me feel…. This part reminded me of….” In the EL support box for Anna Quindlen’s “A Quilt of Country,” the materials suggest displaying academic vocabulary words related to argument and their cognates, such as argument/argumento, position/posicion, opposing/opuesto. Students can then use the terms to complete sentence frames, including “An…presents a claim;…support a claim;…supports reasons.” It is also noted that students “whose primary language is Spanish, Vietnamese, Hmong, Cantonese, Haitian Creole, or Korean” may experience difficulty with the short i sound. It is suggested that the teacher pronounce the critical vocabulary words from the selection that contain the short i sound and have students repeat them.

In Unit 2, the “Text X-Ray” suggests pre-teaching vocabulary and cultural terms and building background for the short story “The Censors” by Luisa Valenzuela. The “Text X-Ray” offers activities and instructional support in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for students at four levels of proficiency: “Beginning,” “Intermediate,” “Advanced,” and “Advanced High.” For reading “The Censors,” the support suggests a two-column chart with sentence frames in the left column. Beginning ELs write a word or phrase that makes sense in the right column after reading specific paragraphs. Intermediate ELs use the same chart, but the students write the word because and complete the sentence after reading specific paragraphs. Advanced ELs are asked to describe the main character and how he is changing, citing text evidence to support their answers. Advanced High ELs are asked to retell the story in a paragraph that would be accessible to Beginning ELs. For the “Interview with John Lewis,” the support box for “Listening” provides strategies for Beginning, Intermediate, High, and Advanced High English Learners. A strategy for an EL student at the Intermediate level for listening is to be given a purpose for listening, and then to listen to the podcast. Teachers are to have students “make a note whenever they hear one of the different elements used in the podcast”; the elements focused on are sound elements and voice narration. In the “Teacher Wrap” for Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream,” for EL support, teachers are advised to point out that three of the “Critical Vocabulary” words for the selection have Spanish cognates: inextricably/inextricablemente, desolate/desolado, degenerate/degenerar.

In Unit 3, for “The Grasshopper and the Bell Cricket” by Yasunari Kawabata, the “Text X-Ray: ELPS Support” for “Speaking” suggests having Beginning ELs use cultural vocabulary by repeating responses to questions. The teacher asks, “What is something that can be worn?” The teacher then points to a picture of a kimono and says, “kimono”; students repeat the response. Advanced High ELs discuss with a partner what they consider to be the most interesting element of Japanese culture presented in the story. They are given choices: lanterns, insect cages, and bell cages. In the EL support box in the “Teacher Wrap” for Frans de Waal’s “Monkey See, Monkey Do, Monkey Connect,” teachers review some common suffixes (-al, -ive, -ous, -tion/-ation) and their meanings. Students then work with a partner to define the words ineffective, emotional, imagination, and various, discussing how the suffix helps them understand the meanings of the words.

In Unit 4, while reading “The Price of Freedom” by Noreen Riols, one of the EL support sections suggests helping EL students analyze figurative language: “Explain that the phrase ‘leaping like a demented kangaroo’ in paragraph 4 is a simile, or a way of comparing two things by using the word like and creating a mental image. Ensure that English Learners know what a kangaroo is by showing them a picture. Explain that demented means ‘not thinking straight’ or ‘crazy.’ Then ask students to complete this sentence: In this sentence in the essay, ‘leaping like a demented kangaroo’ means….” After students complete the sentence using the sentence frame, small groups work together to create a sentence that they feel captures the meaning of the simile. This support is specifically suggested for Intermediate ELs. In the “Teacher Wrap” for William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, for English Learner support, teachers are advised to point out that the verb exile has the Spanish cognate exiliar. Students also develop academic vocabulary by discussing Shakespeare’s use of oxymorons in the play using the sentence frame “…is an oxymoron because…means…and…means…. These meanings are….”

In Unit 5, in the English Learner support box in the “Teacher Wrap” for Wislawa Szymborska’s poem “The End and the Beginning,” teachers are advised that the term photogenic and the “colloquial sentence structure in lines 18–19” may be confusing to students. For Beginning and Intermediate ELs, it is suggested to have students use the cognate fotogenico and the context clue cameras to understand the meaning of the word photogenic.

In Unit 6, before reading The Cruelest Journey: 600 Miles to Timbuktu by Kira Salak, students preview critical vocabulary. The EL support states for the teacher to tell students that three of the vocabulary words have Spanish cognates: circuit/circuito, integrity/integridad, embark/embarcar. Students also read Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth. One of the EL supports is to read and paraphrase. Teachers read aloud the dialogue from lines 31–61 and paraphrase. Then, students work with a partner to retell what happened in simple terms. Teachers monitor conversations for understanding and then have students draw a cartoon of the dialogue with simple speech balloons or captions. This support is recommended for Intermediate/Advanced ELs. In the EL support box, in the “Teacher Wrap” for Homer’s The Odyssey, students rephrase unfamiliar vocabulary for better comprehension. Teachers provide students with a list of substitutions for difficult words and phrases in the selection, such as “have no muster=don’t get together”;“no consultation=don’t share information.” Students work in pairs to reread a section of the text using the given substitutions, then discuss the meanings of these words and phrases.

Sours: https://texasresourcereview.org/programs/hmh-literature-english-i
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Into Literature (2020)

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 10 meet the criteria that materials contain a coherently sequenced set of text-dependent and text-specific questions and tasks that require students to build knowledge and integrate ideas across both individual and multiple texts.

Every single unit for the Grade 10 text includes an Essential Question (EQ) that students must track throughout each unit. All EQ’s are represented throughout each text and within all materials and tasks. Also, within every single unit, students must complete a Collaborate & Compare section, which requires students to individually evaluate, analyze, synthesize, etc. both texts, and students do this as they compare and contrast texts as well. Within the Collaborate & Present section, students complete small group work to better synthesize what they have learned across the two texts, while also utilizing previously gained skills throughout the unit and previous units. Within each Collaborate & Compare section, there are the following sections: Compare, Analyze, and Collaborate. Each of these section titles may vary depending upon the texts and text types, such as Compare Themes and Collaborate and Present. Students also build knowledge and integrate ideas across every individual text within the unit; students also usually compare texts further within the culminating task at the close of the unit.

  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 2, within the Collaborate & Compare section, students read and compare the following texts: "The World as 100 People," an infographic by Jack Hagley, and “A Contribution to Statistics,” a poem by Wisława Szymborska. For each text, student complete a Get Ready section and Check Your Understanding section; however, for Szymborska’s poem a Research section, Analyze the Text section, Create and Discuss section, and Respond to the Essential Question section are also included. At the beginning of each text, before students are expected to read, there is also a Prepare to Compare section that will set students up for success in providing reminders, helpful tips, and suggestions while reading the text to be successful overall in the collaboration of both readings. 

Once students read both individual texts, and complete necessary tasks associated with both, individual texts, students then must complete the Collaborate and Compare tasks, located within the Collaborate & Compare section. Students must “In a small group, complete the charts to track the details and their effect on the message of the infographic and the poem,” within the Compare Details section. Students will fill in sections regarding “Literacy,” or “Housing,” “Internet,” and “Poverty,” for “The World as 100 People.” For “A Contribution to Statistics,” students will complete the sections, that are details from the text, in the chart: “able to admire without envy--eighteen,” “not to be taken lightly--forty and four,” “capable of happiness--twenty-something tops,” and “worthy of compassion--ninety-nine.”

Students will then complete the Analyze the Texts within the Collaborate and Compare section in groups, where they will discuss the questions below:

  1. “Compare: What are the similarities between the infographic and poem?”
  2. “Contrast: What are the differences between the two?”
  3. “Evaluate: How are the purposes of the texts similar? Different?”
  4. “Synthesize: What have you learned about the world’s population from these two texts?”

Students then complete the Collaborate and Present section, where students must get in groups and “continue exploring the ideas in these texts by researching more statistics and using them to create a multimedia presentation.” Students are given specific steps to follow as support.

  • In the Student Edition, Unit 3, students are asked to read two texts, the poem “Carry” by Linda Hogan and the short story “The Seventh Man” by Haruki Murakami. Before reading the poem, the directions explain “Both ‘The Seventh Man’ and ‘Carry’ feature water as an irresistible natural force. As you read “‘Carry” think about how the poet’s exploration of water and its strength echoes details from the short story. How do the speaker of the poem and the narrator of the story feel about water? How are their feelings similar?” Following the reading of both pieces, students compare the texts. Specifically the directions say, “Now you will create a project showing your understanding of how Murakami and Hogan both use the topic of water to express themes about our world….what messages about the world would they like to pass along to an audience as they gaze at the water? Create a two-sided piece of artwork expressing their messages.” After their pieces are created, the instructions also say that students should consider how the topic of water “allowed two writers working in different genres to express universal ideas about our world. Support your ideas with quotations from both texts as you present your artwork.” 
  • In the Teacher's Edition, Unit 4, within the Collaborate & Compare section, students read, watch, and compare the following texts: Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin, an excerpt from a letter by Mohandas K. Gandhi, and Gandhi: the Rise to Fame, a BBC film documentary. For the excerpted letter, students complete a Get Ready, Check Your Understanding section, a Research section, Analyze the Text section, Create and Discuss section, and Respond to the Essential Question section, Critical Vocabulary section, and Vocabulary Strategy: Denotations and Connotations section; within the BBC documentary students complete a Get Ready, Analyze Media section, a Research section, a Create and Present section, and Respond to the Essential Question section. At the beginning of each text, before students are expected to read, there is also a Prepare to Compare section that will set students up for success in providing reminders, helpful tips, and suggestions while reading the text to be successful overall in the collaboration of both readings. 

Once students read (or watch) both individual texts, and complete necessary tasks associated with both, individual, texts, students then must complete the Collaborate and Compare tasks, located within the Collaborate & Compare section. Students must “In a small group, complete the Venn diagram to show some similarities and differences in the information, arguments, ideas, and points of view presented in the letter and the film. One example is completed for you,” within the Compare Accounts section. 

Students will then complete the Analyze the Accounts within the Collaborate and Compare section in groups, where they will discuss the questions below:

  1. “Interpret: ...What can you infer from those word choices about the purposes of each account?”
  2. “Evaluate: ...Why is this an effective way to organize a biography but not an argument, as was presented in the letter?”
  3. “Compare: What are some of the strengths and weaknesses of both the letter and the film?”
  4. “Synthesize: How do the film and letter work together to create a fuller picture of Gandhi than either could alone?”

Students then complete the Compare and Debate section, where students must get in groups and “continue exploring the ideas in these different formats by participating in a debate to answer this question: Which format communicates Gandhi’s ideas more effectively, the letter or the film?” Students are given specific steps to follow as support.

  • In Teacher's Edition, Unit 6, within the Collaborate & Compare section, students read and compare the following texts: “Shakespeare and Samurai (And Robot Ninjas?),” by Caitlin Perry, and an excerpt from Manga Shakespeare: Macbeth by Robert Deas and Richard Appignanesi. Students complete a Get Ready section for each text. Once completing the book review, however, students complete the following sections: Check Your Understanding, Research, Analyze the Text, Create and Discuss, Respond to the Essential Question, Critical Vocabulary, Vocabulary Strategy: Word Roots, and Language Conventions: Parentheses.  At the beginning of each text, before students are expected to read, there is also a Prepare to Compare section that will set students up for success in providing reminders, helpful tips, and suggestions while reading the text to be successful overall in the collaboration of both readings. 

Once students read both individual texts, and complete necessary tasks associated with both, individual, texts, students then must complete the Collaborate and Compare tasks, located within the Collaborate & Compare section. Students must complete the following Compare Across Genres task: “...To better understand her analysis of the book, revisit the chart you used to record graphic novel elements while reading. Does Perry address any of these elements? If so, what is her assessment of how the authors of the manga handled them? Use a chart like the one below to describe Perry’s analysis of the manga…” 

Students will then complete the Analyze the Texts within the Collaborate and Compare section in groups, where they will discuss the questions below:

  1. “Analyze: what evidence does Perry give for her positive feelings toward the excerpt from Manga Shakespeare: Macbeth? How does she present this evidence to portray it in a positive light?”
  2. “Evaluate: How would Perry have change the graphic novel?...”
  3. “Infer: What do you think Perry would say about the airplane in the first frame of the graphic novel?”
  4. “Connect: What does Perry think of similar work, in which a familiar text is explored in a different medium and context? What do you think are benefits of these kinds of works?”

Students then complete the Compare and Present section, where students must get in groups and “deliver an argument agreeing or disagreeing with Perry’s assessment of the manga version of The Tragedy of Macbeth.” Students are given specific steps to follow as support.

Sours: https://www.edreports.org/reports/detail/into-literature-10
HMH Into Reading - Grade 5 Module 8 Week 2 - From Scratch

HMH Into Literature English II

Quality Review

The quality review is the result of extensive evidence gathering and analysis by Texas educators of how well instructional materials satisfy the criteria for quality in the subject-specific rubric. Follow the links below to view the scores and read the evidence used to determine quality.

Our Process

Summary of the Grade-Band Quality ReviewRead an overview of this program's product evaluation.

Overview

Section 1. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) and English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Alignment

Grade

TEKS Student % 

TEKS Teacher % 

ELPS Student % 

ELPS Teacher %

English I

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

English II

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

Section 2. Texts (what students read, see, and hear) 

  • The materials include high-quality texts across a variety of text types and genres. 
  • The materials include quantitative and qualitative analyses resulting in a grade-band categorization of texts, and they provide information about the Lexile level and text structure, language features, meaning, and knowledge demands regarding the texts found in the program. The materials include texts that are appropriately complex for the grade levels. 

Section 3. Literacy Practices and Text Interactions: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Thinking, Inquiry, and Research 

  • The materials provide students the opportunity to analyze and integrate knowledge, ideas, themes, and connections within texts using clear and concise information and well-defended text-supported claims through coherently sequenced questions and activities. 
  • The materials consistently provide students the opportunity to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.
  • The materials provide a year-long plan for building academic vocabulary and include scaffolds and supports for teachers to differentiate vocabulary development for all learners.
  • The materials provide students the opportunity to develop composition skills across multiple text types for varied purposes and audiences.
  • The materials provide students consistent opportunities to listen to and speak about texts. 
  • The materials provide opportunities for students to engage in both short-term and sustained inquiry processes throughout the year and provide support to identify and summarize high-quality primary and secondary sources.

Section 4. Developing and Sustaining Foundational Literacy Skills (Grades K-5 only) 

Section 5. Supports for Diverse Learners 

  • The materials include supports for students who perform below grade level and above grade level. 
  • The materials provide support and scaffolding strategies for English Learners (ELs).

Section 6. Ease of Use and Supports for Implementation 

  • The materials include a TEKS for English Language Arts and Reading-aligned scope and sequence.
  • The materials include annotations and support for engaging students in the materials as well as annotations and ancillary materials that provide support for student learning and assistance for teachers.

Section 7. Technology, Cost, and Professional Learning Support 

  • The publisher submitted the technology, cost, and professional learning support worksheets.

Standards Alignment

Rubric Section 1

TEKS and ELPS Alignment

Percent of standards met in materials

GradeTEKS Student %TEKS Teacher %ELPS Student %ELPS Teacher %
Grade 10 100% 100% 100% 100%

Criteria for Quality

Rubric Section 2TextsWhat students read, see, and hearTotalTOTAL100% (12 out of 12 points)100%80% Recommended

Section 2TextsWhat students read, see, and hearTotal100% (12 out of 12 points)

Evaluation for 2.1
Materials include high-quality texts for ELAR instruction and cover a range of student interests.

The instructional materials meet the criteria of this indicator; they include high-quality texts that have been previously published and a variety of informational and literary pieces written by experts. The texts appeal to a range of student interests, and the language and vocabulary is appropriate to each genre. Additionally, the texts represent well-crafted writing that provides adequate context for close reading. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

Unit 1 includes literary texts that provide rich characterizations, such as “What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret. The informational texts use rich, academic vocabulary and language appropriate to the disciplines they represent. Informational texts include the Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion written by Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan. The texts consider a range of student interests and would appeal to 10th-grade students. Unit 1 includes texts about diverse cultural experiences, such as “By Any Other Name” by Santha Rama Rau. 

Unit 2 includes works by world-renowned authors that relate to personal experiences, such as “Total Eclipse” by Annie Dillard and “A Contribution to Statistics” by Wislawa Szymborska. Annie Dillard’s essay is literary nonfiction that uses narration to convey personal involvement; the author describes a total eclipse that she experienced. In “A Contribution to Statistics,” Wislawa Szymborska expresses her point of view about human nature and the human condition. These two texts are within a unit in which students are responding to the thematic idea of how personal perspective shapes people’s opinions.

Unit 3 includes stories with realistic and believable characters representing a variety of cultural experiences and backgrounds, such as in “My Life as a Bat” by Margaret Atwood. Informational texts include a public service announcement created by the National Park Service titled “Find Your Park.” The informational texts use rich, academic vocabulary and language appropriate to the disciplines they represent. 

Unit 4 includes works by world-renowned authors, such as “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr. Literary texts provide complex characterizations, as in “The Briefcase” by Rebecca Makkaiin. The texts consider a range of student interests and would appeal to 10th-grade students. Unit 4 includes texts about struggles for freedom and includes “The Hawk Can Soar” by Randi Davenport.

Unit 5 includes informational texts that use rich, academic vocabulary and language appropriate to the discipline they represent. In an excerpt from Sonia Shah’s science-based expository text The Fever, the author uses complex, scientific vocabulary appropriate to the genre. Students encounter vocabulary such as anomalous, intrinsic, vestiges, and evolve, as Shah explores the topic of malaria. Informational texts include a historical article by award-winning journalist Allison Keyes, “A Community Forever Altered by a Forgotten Massacre,” and an excerpt from Sonia Shah’s science-based expository text The Fever. The texts consider a range of student interests and would appeal to 10th-grade students. This unit includes texts about change, such as “A Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury, which students at this age can relate to. 

In Unit 6, literary texts offer complex characterizations, providing students with the opportunity to analyze characters’ ambitions, such as in The Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare, where students compare the characters of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth and explain internal conflicts. The three-dimensional, detailed characterizations are present throughout the literary texts, adding to the well-crafted, high-quality value overall. 

Evaluation for 2.2
Materials include a variety of text types and genres across content that meet the requirements of the TEKS for each grade level.

The materials contain both literary and informational texts outlined for English II by the TEKS. Literary texts include short stories, poetry, and one dramatic work. The materials do not include a variety of texts from world literature across literary periods. Informational texts include argumentative texts in the form of letters and opinions from a court case as well as multimodal texts in the form of infographics and graphic novels.

Examples of literary texts include but are not limited to:

“What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret (short story)
“Mirror” by Sylvia Plath (poetry)
“The Seventh Man” by Haruki Murakami (short story)
“Elsewhere” by Derek Walcott (poetry)
“Sonnets to Orpheus, Part Two, XII,” by Rainer Maria Rilke (poetry)
“The Macbeth Murder Mystery” by James Thurber (short story)
The Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare (drama)

English II requires students to read and analyze world literature across literary periods. The following are examples of literary texts from world literature that ask the students to respond in ways that meet the requirements for the TEKS for English II: 

“What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret (folktale)
“The Seventh Man” by Haruki Murakamii (short story)
The Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare (drama)

With the exception of Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth, there is a lack of literary texts written prior to the 20th century. 

Examples of informational texts include but are not limited to:

“By Any Other Name” by Santha Rama Rau (informational)
Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion by William J. Brennan (argumentative)
“American Flag Stands for Tolerance” by Ronald J. Allen (argumentative)
“Joyas Voladoras” by Brian Doyle (informational)
“Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr. (argumentative)
“Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin” by Mohandas Gandhi (argumentative)
excerpt from The Fever by Sonia Shah (informational)

Examples of print and graphic features include but are not limited to:

Throughout the materials, the texts are accompanied by a variety of graphics, including photographs, paintings, digital graphics, graphic organizers, and other graphics; they also contain print features such as bolded words, titles, subtitles, and word banks. 

Examples of multimodal texts include but are not limited to: 

“The World as 100 People” by Jack Hagley (infographic) 
“Find Your Park” by National Park Service (PSA)
Gandhi: The Rise to Fame by BBC (documentary) 
Manga Shakespeare: Macbeth by Robert Deas (graphic novel excerpt) 

Evaluation for 2.3
Texts are at an appropriate level of complexity to support students at their grade level.

The materials include texts appropriately complex for English II students with a text complexity analysis provided at the beginning of each text. The analysis clearly explains the grade-level appropriateness of the text and includes both a quantitative measure and many qualitative descriptors. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

Each analysis includes a rationale for the quantitative and qualitative measures considered for the text. The quantitative measure is the Lexile level, while the qualitative measures feature the ideas presented, the text structures used, the language complexity, and the background knowledge required. Quantitative measures are not provided for poetry or multimodal texts. Text complexity and increasing rigor are considered and are noted in the qualitative measures. 

In Unit 3, the text complexity analysis for “My Life as a Bat,” a short fictional story by Margaret Atwood, states that the text has a quantitative level of 990L. Regarding the ideas presented, the analysis states: “Includes multiple levels of meaning and multiple themes.” Regarding text structure: “Unconventional story structure with numbered heads and multiple flashbacks/memories.” Regarding language complexity: “Some figurative language requiring interpretation.” Regarding the knowledge required for comprehension: “Single perspective with unfamiliar aspects; some cultural and literary knowledge useful.” This analysis allows teachers to understand the text’s complexity and how its features may affect comprehension.

Quantitatively the texts are between 710L and 1480L. Qualitatively the units tend to build toward more complex texts that require inferential thinking, background knowledge that is essential for understanding, complex concepts, and more archaic and unfamiliar language with complex structures. In Unit 2, the text complexity analysis for the poem “Mirror” states that the text includes multiple levels of ideas with nonliteral language and sentences with figurative language. In Unit 5, the text-complexity analysis for “A Sound of Thunder” states that the text contains substantial descriptive language, complex sentence structures, and historical references that may require special knowledge. “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” and The Tragedy of Macbeth are both in later units, Unit 4 and Unit 6 respectively, because of their qualitative complexities. 

Half of the texts fall within the 1080L–1335L range, which is ideal for 10th grade. 


 

Rubric Section 3Literacy Practices and Text Interactions: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Thinking, Inquiry and ResearchWhat students are asked to write, speak and demonstrate.TotalTOTAL100% (45 out of 45 points)100%80% Recommended

Section 3Literacy Practices and Text Interactions: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Thinking, Inquiry and ResearchWhat students are asked to write, speak and demonstrate.Total100% (45 out of 45 points)

3.a Reading: Questions and Tasks

Evaluation for 3.a.1
Materials contain questions and tasks that support students in analyzing and integrating knowledge, ideas, themes, and connections within and across texts.

The materials contain questions and tasks that support students in analyzing and integrating knowledge, ideas, themes, and connections within and across texts. Units are organized by essential questions relating to the theme of multiple texts. Questions and tasks build conceptual knowledge and are text-dependent. The materials provide sufficient opportunities for students to discuss and answer questions about complex elements of the text. Students are asked to make connections to personal experiences, other texts, and the world around them. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students analyze symbolism in the short story “What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret by highlighting references to doors and doorways and determining what they may symbolize. Students analyze characterization by highlighting examples of the author’s word choice and determine how these choices develop Sergei’s character in the story. In the “Compare and Connect” section, students discuss the ideas expressed in both the Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion by William J. Brennan and the argument “American Flag Stands for Tolerance” by Ronald J. Allen and explain which argument they find more convincing.

In Unit 2, in the “Analyze the Text” section for “Mirror” by Sylvia Plath, students identify the theme of the poem and provide evidence from the poem to support their responses.

In Unit 3, in the “Compare and Connect” section, students compare themes in the short story “The Seventh Man” by Haruki Murakami and the poem “Carry” by Linda Hogan and discuss how the authors’ attitudes toward these themes differ.

In Unit 4, students discuss with a small group how the memoir “The Hawk Can Soar” by Randi Davenport relates to the theme of hard-won liberty. Team members gather evidence and prepare ideas, reviewing annotations made in their response logs before participating in the discussion. In this lesson, the students are also asked to evaluate how a short paragraph serves as a statement of a memoir’s theme. These questions and discussions build students’ knowledge and require students to draw on textual evidence while identifying and discussing the theme and big ideas. 

In Unit 5, students are asked to analyze theme and support their responses with evidence from “The Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury: “What theme or message does this story convey? In what ways is setting important to the theme?” The questions require the careful reading and examination of complex elements of the text. 

In Unit 6, when reading Macbeth by William Shakespeare, students analyze characterization in drama by highlighting words in the Captain’s speech that reveal Macbeth’s character. In Scene 3, students analyze persuasive techniques by highlighting repetition. In Act 4, Scene 2, students analyze specific lines for characterization and determine what they reveal about Lady Macduff’s perspective.

Evaluation for 3.a.2
Materials contain questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

The materials contain questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. The materials provide opportunities for students to identify the stated and implied purposes of different authors’ writing and to make inferences and draw conclusions about those purposes in a variety of texts and genres. Questions and tasks support the study of author’s craft and how the author’s choices in language influence the reader. Questions often ask students to analyze the author’s syntax and word choice and to provide specific textual evidence to support their analysis. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students complete a graphic organizer in which they identify clues about purpose and audience in the Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion by William J. Brennan and the argument “American Flag Stands for Tolerance” by Ronald J. Allen. In the guiding questions for the poem “Without Title” by Diane Glancy, students are asked to highlight details in the first four lines of the poem that provide the speaker’s father’s historical/cultural background and consider why the speaker begins the poem by “sharing details that no longer apply to her father’s life.”

In Unit 2, the “Analyze the Text” questions ask students to discuss the similarities and differences in the purposes of the infographic “The World as 100 People” by Jack Hagley and the poem “A Contribution to Statistics” by Wislawa Szymborska, making connections across two texts based on the same idea. They are also asked to synthesize what they have learned in the two texts after comparing and contrasting them and evaluating the purposes. Guiding questions for “The Night Face Up” by Julio Cortazar ask students to notice the sensory language of the short story and note how it changes the mood and tone of the plot.

In Unit 3, within the “Check Your Understanding” questions for “My Life as a Bat” by Margaret Atwood, students respond to a multiple-choice question: “References to popular culture and historical events [in the story] serve to….” In the “Collaborate and Compare” and “Analyze the Text” sections, students read the short story “The Seventh Man” and a biography of its author, Haruki Murakami, and the poem “Carry” and a biography of its author, Linda Hogan. Then, students discuss how the authors’ cultural backgrounds or geography may have shaped their attitudes toward nature. Students complete a graphic organizer in which they compare the authors’ use of language. Students also analyze choices made by the creators of the multimodal public service announcement “Find Your Park” by the National Park Service. Students focus on the pace or cuts between images in the PSA and determine how the pace serves the purpose of motivating viewers to visit a national park.

In Unit 4, “Analyze the Accounts” questions ask students to describe the tone and word choice in “Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin” by Mohandas K. Gandhi and the documentary film Gandhi: The Rise to Fame by BBC and make inferences from these word choices about the purposes of each account. Students also study how fragments can be intentionally used by a writer to emphasize an idea, develop tone, or create a voice; they look at examples from “The Hawk Can Soar” by Randi Davenport and explain why the fragment was used. This task requires students to study the language and choices of an author and how they influence meaning.

In Unit 5, for “A Community Forever Altered by a Forgotten Massacre” by Allison Keyes, students are asked to highlight a claim the author makes about how we view history and explain how this claim challenges, changes, or confirms their own views. Also, students are asked to infer the author’s purpose in an informational text, The Fever by Sonia Shah. They provide evidence for their answer. In an excerpt from The Fever, guiding questions within the text ask students to interpret why the author begins by explaining the progression of diseases other than malaria (which is the focus of the text). Students are also asked to consider the author’s purpose for including superscript numbers in paragraph 7 (the numbers are linked to original sources) and to make an inference about how the author’s language reveals the intended audience of the text.

Evaluation for 3.a.3
Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary in and across texts.

Materials include a cohesive, year-long plan for students to interact with and build key academic vocabulary in and across texts. Students apply words in appropriate contexts. Scaffolds and supports for teachers to differentiate vocabulary development for all learners are provided.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Students are introduced to five new academic vocabulary words at the beginning of each unit. Students study a completed “Word Network” (graphic organizer) for one word, which includes its synonyms, antonyms, word root or origin, related words, clarifying example, and definition. Students discuss this Word Network with a partner, then complete a Word Network for the remaining four words on their own. Students use academic vocabulary in discussions about texts. In Unit 3, students read the short story “My Life as a Bat” by Margaret Atwood and respond to questions that contain two of the unit’s academic vocabulary words. Teachers guide students to include these terms in their responses. In Unit 5, students are introduced to the academic vocabulary and asked to complete more Word Networks. This vocabulary is then repeated in a variety of contexts throughout the unit as students interact with the vocabulary in different activities. 

Academic vocabulary is repeated in a variety of contexts and used throughout the texts.

For example, in Unit 5, students read “The Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury and discuss three questions that apply critical vocabulary from the unit: “What explicit warning about the Path does Travis give to the hunters, and why? What is the Path like? How do those qualities facilitate the hunt?” Students use the academic vocabulary words explicit and facilitate in their responses with partners; volunteers share their responses with the class. 

“Vocabulary Studio,” found in “Resources,” is an interactive module that “provides students with instruction on key aspects of vocabulary.” The materials offer instruction and practice with ways to decipher the meaning of words that students will encounter while reading. Instruction and practice includes learning and applying knowledge and skills such as using context clues; analyzing word structure; recognizing and applying roots, prefixes, and suffixes; and practicing denotation and connotation. Vocabulary Studio lessons are suggested in the “Plan” section for most selections in the teacher’s edition. In Unit 2, for “The Night Face Up,” by Julio Cortazar, the suggested Vocabulary Studio is “Connotation and Denotation.” In Unit 5, for The Fever by Sonia Shah, the suggested Vocabulary Studio is “Affixes.” The lessons in the studio “are arranged by skill for each grade level and provide additional support and independent practice for students,” in order to develop reading and writing skills by focusing on vocabulary comprehension skills. 

Materials also include embedded supports throughout the units in both the student and teacher’s editions. The student edition supports include unit academic vocabulary overviews and prompts to reinforce students’ application of academic vocabulary in their written and spoken responses. Each unit introduces academic vocabulary that applies to all text selections within that unit. In Unit 1, teachers introduce academic vocabulary that relates to all of the texts in that unit. Students discuss the vocabulary with a partner as they complete the Word Networks. Example words from this lesson include discriminate, diverse, inhibit, intervene, and rational. The graphic organizers and discussions help scaffold vocabulary development for diverse learners. 

The teacher’s edition supports include overviews and pedagogical recommendations, including specific descriptions of how to introduce the vocabulary, what questions to ask when students encounter vocabulary in context, and how to have partners write and discuss academic vocabulary. At the end of selections, students can practice and apply their vocabulary. Specific vocabulary strategies, such as the use of context clues in determining word meaning, are also taught and applied consistently. These embedded supports are included in every unit, which demonstrates a year-long plan.

Evaluation for 3.a.4
Materials include a clearly defined plan to support and hold students accountable as they engage in independent reading.

The materials include a clearly defined plan to support and hold students accountable as they engage in independent reading. Procedures and/or protocols, along with support for teachers, are included to foster independent reading. A plan is provided for students to self-select text and read independently for a sustained period of time. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

Each unit includes lessons for independent reading. The texts are related to, and expand upon, the themes of the units. In Unit 1, students can choose from a memoir, poem, short story, or argument text. In Unit 2, students choose between a poem, essay, informational text, and a short story. Unit 3 has an argument text, essay, poem, and short story for students to choose from. In Unit 6, there is a history text, argument, poem, and drama available for students’ independent reading selection. Each selection is related to the unit’s overall theme. 

Each unit contains selections for students to choose for their independent reading. Students are provided a process for self-selecting texts. Each “Independent Reading” section begins with a photo gallery that includes an image and tagline or hook for each selection. In Unit 2, there is a photograph of what appears to be left of a city after a catastrophic event. Under the photo is the title of the selection, “By the Waters of Babylon” by Stephen Vincent Benet, followed by the statement “A young narrator sets off on his own to try to understand a post-apocalyptic world he has only heard rumors of.” Students are directed to read these descriptions to determine which text gets their attention, to think about which genres they enjoy reading, and to “select the text or texts that [they] want to read on [their] own.” They can base their selections on their interest they noted in their response logs from the unit. They may also choose their selections based on their interest or reading level after they preview the texts. 

The materials also contain an online digital library with access to over 100 full-length digital novels. Students can preview these novels and choose a selection based on their interest. There is a sidebar tool that allows students to make notes while reading and to highlight the text. 

The procedures for independent reading are consistent for each unit: students follow guidelines to select the text(s) that they want to read; students review the “Signposts” for the unit and are reminded to apply them to their independent reading; students read the self-selected text(s); and students discuss the text(s) with a partner.

The teacher’s edition provides teachers with suggestions to help students become goal-oriented readers. For instance, in the teacher’s edition pages for the independent reading lessons for Units 2, 4, and 5, materials provide teachers support, such as strategies to help students set a purpose for reading, set goals for reading, adopt an appropriate mindset for reading, and track their progress while reading independently. 

Materials also include a professional learning component to help teachers implement the independent reading lessons for each unit. This component is found in the “Professional Learning” resource. This resource provides teachers with an overview of the independent reading lesson elements, and of the resources students can access to enhance their independent reading experience. 

There are several options for accountability. Teachers can encourage students to use their “Notice and Note Signposts” strategy as they read and mark their thinking in the notes section or to share their thoughts about their independent reading with others. There are also selection tests available that ask multiple-choice questions, technology-enhanced questions, and constructed-response questions. 

The student edition provides students with a guide to complete the objectives of the independent reading lessons. This guide includes supports that help students, such as prompts to set a purpose for reading; prompts to reinforce skills students are developing throughout the curriculum, such as “Notice and Note” activities; and activities like using logs to track reading progress and comprehension. Materials also include prompts to encourage peer discussions and guide activities to help students select independent reading. Examples of these materials are found on independent reading lesson pages for Units 2, 4, and 5.

3.b Writing

Evaluation for 3.b.1
Materials provide support for students to develop writing skills across multiple text types for a variety of purposes and audiences.

The materials provide support for students to develop writing skills across multiple text types for a variety of purposes and audiences. Students are given opportunities to write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. The materials provide opportunities for students to write informational texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are provided opportunities to write argumentative texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students write correspondence in a professional or friendly structure. The materials provide opportunities to write literary and/or rhetorical analyses.

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students read “American Flag Stands for Tolerance” by Ronald J. Allen and write a letter to the editor in which they respond to the ideas expressed in the selection. 

In Unit 2, students are given a literary prompt: “Write a short story about how things are revealed to be different from how they first appeared.” They are presented with a mentor text as an example and are encouraged to use their “Response Log” notes from the unit. The writing prompt has a “Read, Think, Write” format with a checklist of guidelines, such as “begin by introducing a setting, a narrator, and a main character” and “include sensory language and descriptive details.” Students also write a friendly letter to a real or imagined person who fits into one of the statistical categories from the poem “A Contribution to Statistics” by Wislawa Szymborska. They review the format of a friendly letter and identify their audience. They are asked to provide or request advice in their letter.

In Unit 3, students learn the elements of writing narratives. Students are given the opportunity to rewrite story hooks to include specific techniques learned earlier in the module, such as vivid details and a surprising statement or question. Students rewrite a section of the King Midas story from the point of view of the king’s daughter. Students also write the opening of a short story in which they introduce and develop a character using three of the five characterization techniques that they learned earlier in the module. Also in Unit 3, teachers review the elements of a strong explanatory essay. Students are asked to write an essay about “a specific aspect of nature and our relationship to it.” A mentor text is provided along with several student supports, such as sentence frames, a graphic organizer for planning, a revision checklist, an editing checklist, and a scoring rubric. In another lesson, after listening to a public service announcement from the National Park Service, “Find Your Park,” students write a “letter to the editor” advocating for a new national park. They clearly state a thesis that is supported with facts and details and end their letter with a call to action. 

In Unit 4, students are given a writing prompt that has them read the quote “Freedom means different things to different people.” They are then asked to think carefully about the question “What do we need in order to feel free?” After these steps, they write an argument essay about what freedom means to them. A mentor text is provided along with graphic organizers, supports, and scaffolds for each phase of the writing process. Also in Unit 4, after reading an excerpt from Mohandas Gandhi’s “Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin,” students write a short essay analyzing and evaluating the strength of Gandhi’s argument. In this brief writing assignment, they are directed to write one paragraph that analyzes his “claims, reasons, evidence, and rhetoric, providing examples from the text of the letter” and then to write a second paragraph discussing why they think his argument failed to persuade the Viceroy. 

In Unit 5, after reading the science fiction text “A Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury, students are asked to write their own story about characters who travel through time, thinking about “What technological advances will allow your characters to time travel?” They are provided with a list of steps to take in their writing, including deciding on main and supporting characters, determining problems, using a timeline for events, and developing a strong and engaging voice when using first-person narration. 

In the Unit 6 tasks at the end of the unit, students write a literary analysis about the play Macbeth by Shakespeare. Students are guided through the writing process from planning to publishing. 

3.b.2
Most written tasks require students to use clear and concise information and well- defended text-supported claims to demonstrate the knowledge gained through analysis and synthesis of texts.

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Evaluation for 3.b.2
Most written tasks require students to use clear and concise information and well- defended text-supported claims to demonstrate the knowledge gained through analysis and synthesis of texts.

Most written tasks require students to use clear and concise information and well-defended text-supported claims to demonstrate knowledge gained through the analysis and synthesis of texts. Students are provided opportunities to use evidence from texts to support their opinions and claims. Students also demonstrate, in writing, what they have learned through reading and listening to texts.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Each text selection ends with a section where students analyze the text and support their responses with evidence from the text. They are required to infer, evaluate, cite evidence, analyze, interpret, and “Notice and Note.” For example, in Unit 1, students read “By Any Other Name” by Santha Rama Rau and interpret character motivation by answering the question “What do the headmistress’s gestures and expressions tell you about her motivation for changing the girls’ names?” They are also asked to cite specific evidence: “Name two ways in which the Indian girls who have been at the school for a while imitate the English girls. How do these examples reflect the historical context of the memoir?” Most questions require critical thinking and are textually based so that students must return to the text to cite evidence.

In Unit 2, students create a double-entry journal. In the left-hand column, they record text passages that they feel are important, surprising, or confusing as they read an excerpt from Total Eclipse by Annie Dillard. In the right-hand column, they write an interpretation or restatement of the text along with their observation. After reading is complete, the materials provide students with a series of questions that increase in complexity from Depth of Knowledge (DoK) 2 to DoK 4. These questions are categorized as: “Interpret,” “Compare,” “Summarize,” “Critique,” and “Notice and Note.” The “Interpret” prompt asks: “What historical allusions does the author make? How do these allusions contribute to the tone of the essay?” Students are required to support their responses to these questions and/or prompts with textual evidence.

In Unit 3, for “Joyas Voladoras” by Brian Doyle, students read and annotate the text for the main idea and supporting details, then respond to an “Analyze the Text” question that asks: “What is the central message of the essay? What main ideas and details lead to the central message? Cite evidence from the text.”

At the end of each unit, students complete a summative writing task that is based on the readings from the unit. In Unit 4, students produce an argumentative essay for their summative writing task. This writing task requires students to make their claim, then support their argument with reasoning and evidence from sources encountered throughout the unit. The graphic organizer used during the “Plan” section of this task includes prompts that guide students to produce a thesis with a claim, a counterclaim, and three reasons for both the claim and counterclaim, each with supporting evidence. Students receive directions for using this organizer: “Clearly organize your reasons and relevant evidence, progressing logically from one idea to the next.” Materials also prompt students to refer to their notes from their unit response log (a log of notes taken during their reading lessons) when planning their essay. 

In Unit 6, students write an essay comparing the witches as portrayed in Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth and in Manga Shakespeare: Macbeth by manga artists Robert Deas and Richard Appignanesi. Students are told: “Write a comparison about the effects of the Witches in the play and in the manga.” They review Act 1, Scene 3, and describe how they would visualize the witches. Then, they look back at the manga artists’ drawings and describe them. They write a final paragraph comparing these two portrayals, using text evidence to support their claims. 

 

3.b.3
Over the course of the year, writing skills and knowledge of conventions are applied in increasingly complex contexts, with opportunities for students to publish their writing.

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Evaluation for 3.b.3
Over the course of the year, writing skills and knowledge of conventions are applied in increasingly complex contexts, with opportunities for students to publish their writing.

Writing skills and knowledge of conventions are applied in increasingly complex contexts over the course of the year, with opportunities for students to publish their writing. The materials facilitate students’ coherent use of the elements of the writing process. Opportunities are provided for the practice and application of the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing, including punctuation and grammar. Grammar, punctuation, and usage are taught systematically, both in and out of context, and grow in depth and complexity within and across units.

Examples include but are not limited to:

There is a writing task at the end of each unit that guides students through the full writing process (plan, draft, revise, edit, publish). For example, in Unit 1, students write a personal essay that explores a time when they had to decide how to interact with others. In the planning stage, students use provided graphic organizers to brainstorm ideas of personal experiences and record the chronological order of events. During the revising stage, students use a guide to ask themselves specific questions, such as “Do vivid details bring the event to life?” Students also exchange papers with a partner to evaluate drafts and give suggestions. Specific editing conventions to be applied to the writing are addressed. Students “edit for the proper use of standard English conventions and make sure to correct any misspellings or grammatical errors.” They are also instructed on verb tenses and then asked to specifically edit their paper for the appropriate tense. Students then publish and present their essays. 

The materials often teach grammar, punctuation, and usage within the context of reading and writing. Within the context of composing essays, the materials introduce specific grammar and punctuation rules and give students opportunities to discuss, practice out of context, and apply the rules to their writing. For example, in Unit 2, students study complex sentences and practice identifying the independent and dependent clauses. Students apply the skill first by revising a piece of their own writing, joining together simple sentences to form complex sentences, and then checking their work with a partner. They continue to apply the skill in their summative writing task when they edit their short story specifically for complex sentences that are written correctly.

The materials provide opportunities for students to learn about and practice the conventions of academic language in the “Language Conventions” sidebars included for every text. Focus conventions include but are not limited to comma usage, diction, tone, and subject-verb agreement. For example, in Unit 1, students read “What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” and annotate and analyze the author’s use of specific language conventions, such as use of tone, diction, and syntax. In Unit 6, students read “The Macbeth Murder Mystery” by James Thurber and write a short paragraph reviewing the selection, using pronouns and clear antecedents that agree in number.

The materials include a “Grammar Studio” that provides direct instruction and practice opportunities for grammar. Modules focus on topics such as agreement, capital letters, parts of speech, and punctuation. Specific grammatical structures or skills from the modules are tagged to reading selections that contain strong examples. For example, in Unit 1, in the “Get Ready” section that precedes “By Any Other Name” by Santha Rama Rau in the student edition, students are asked to note the author’s use of the past perfect verb tense while reading the memoir. In the “Language Conventions” activity that follows the selection, students review examples of verb tenses that the author uses, then write about an exciting experience that they have had using appropriate verb tenses. In Unit 3, students read “My Life as a Bat” by Margaret Atwood, analyze the author’s use of colons in the short story, and then revise their presentations about bats to include at least one colon and discuss how the colon clarified or enhanced meaning.
 

3.c Speaking and Listening

Evaluation for 3.c.1
Materials support students’ listening and speaking about texts.

The materials support students’ listening and speaking about texts by providing opportunities that are focused on the text(s) being studied in class, allowing students to demonstrate comprehension. Oral tasks require students to use clear and concise information and well-defended text-supported claims to demonstrate knowledge gained through the analysis and synthesis of texts. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, materials provide teachers with strategies to engage students in collaborative discussions focused on the reading selections being studied. For the Unit 1 reading selection “What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret, text-based questions include “How do archetypes help to show conflict in the story?” and “What theme does this story convey? What details support your answer?” Students first respond individually, then share their responses in small groups via the given discussion protocol. After reading the Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion by William J. Brennan and the argument text “American Flag Stands for Tolerance” by Ronald J. Allen, students collaborate and compare. Small groups reread the two selections and use a chart to identify clues that indicate the intended audience and the author’s purpose. Groups then discuss questions that compare the selections’ arguments in order to evaluate whether one author seems more credible and why, to connect the arguments to a recent event, and to compare the authors’ tones. This task requires well-defended text-supported claims.

In Unit 2, in the “Create and Present” post-reading activity for “Total Eclipse” by Annie Dillard, students create a “two-paragraph comparison between Annie Dillard’s description and the 2017 eyewitness eclipse account [they] researched.” To create this comparison, materials prompt students: “Introduce the topic and explain the sources of these two accounts”; use appropriate details and language conventions; and “Support your ideas with quotations and paraphrases.” Students are then prompted: “Have a discussion and share your opinion.” Students must use appropriate language conventions when speaking, and the materials prompt: “Support ideas with details from both texts.” These directions demonstrate requirements for use of clear and concise information and text-supported claims. 

In Unit 4, after reading an excerpt from “Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin” by Mohandas Gandhi and watching a film clip from Gandhi: The Rise to Fame by the BBC, students discuss a series of questions in a group. For example, “Describe the tone and word choice of the author and narrator, providing examples from the letter and film. What can you infer from those word choices about the purposes of each account?” In the “Compare and Debate” activity, students respond to the following question: “Which format communicates Gandhi’s ideas more effectively, the letter or the film?” Students use a graphic organizer to gather evidence from both the letter and the film in preparation for the debate. 

In Unit 5, materials provide teachers with strategies to engage students in collaborative discussions focused on the reading selections being studied. For the Unit 5 reading selection “A Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury, students respond to text-based prompts like “Write a comment or question about the story” and “Pose a question to the class, such as ‘How did the trip to the past both fulfill and crush the hunters’ dreams?’” Students first respond independently, and then share their responses with a small group.

In Unit 6, when reading The Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare, students consider what advice they would give Macbeth after his meeting with the witches. Students think individually and take notes; then, partners discuss their ideas with each other; finally, pairs share their ideas with the class. In the “Create and Present” post-reading activity for The Tragedy of Macbeth, Act 2, students have a small-group discussion, responding to the question “Why does Lady Macbeth faint? Is it a distraction, or is it real?” Directions prompt students: “Support your conclusion with evidence from the text.” The materials provide prompts to guide students through their discussion. Directions prompt students to record their initial, individual responses; “Use cause-and-effect connecting words to link your ideas.” Students are then told: “Discuss these ideas and your interpretation(s) of her action. Together, draw one or more conclusions about her motives.” Small groups share their group conclusions with the class. Materials remind teachers that all opinions should be supported with text evidence. These directions demonstrate requirements for use of clear and concise information and text-supported claims. 

Evaluation for 3.c.2
Materials engage students in productive teamwork and student-led discussions, in both formal and informal settings.

The materials engage students in productive teamwork and student-led discussions, in both formal and informal settings. Grade-level protocols for discussion are provided. Students are given opportunities to give organized presentations/performances and speak in a clear and concise manner using the conventions of language.

Examples include but are not limited to:

The online materials provide a “Speaking and Listening Studio” that explains how to collaborate effectively and how to give an effective presentation. The studio discusses establishing and following procedures and explains how to speak constructively and how to listen and respond thoughtfully. Guidelines and protocols for discussions and presentations are thoroughly detailed. Within the studio, there are multiple video examples and sound clips, and each section has activities and quizzes that allow students to check their understanding. 

In Unit 1, students learn the protocols for collaborative discussions, including “actively participate, listen to one another, build on each other’s ideas, stay on topic, and achieve discussion goals together.” Students listen to a recording of a collaborative discussion and follow along with a transcript of the discussion, which is broken into sections. Students evaluate a specific element of collaborative discussions after each section. 

In Unit 2, students adapt the short story they wrote for the end-of-unit task into a podcast. Students use a graphic organizer in which they adapt their writing by considering revisions that can make the story appeal to an audience of listeners. Students are provided a checklist with effective verbal techniques and guidelines for creating a podcast. Students listen to podcasts and practice effective verbal techniques, such as enunciation, voice modulation and pitch, speaking rate, and microphone skills. Teachers set aside time to allow all students to post their podcasts and listen to others’ podcasts. Materials direct students to the Speaking and Listening Studio for guidance. Students produce similar writing in Unit 4 as they adapt their writing into an oral presentation.

In Unit 3, students read the short story “My Life as a Bat” by Margaret Atwood. Teachers are given the option to direct students to work in one of two small-group protocols. The “Plan” section of the teacher’s edition materials provides teachers with directions for two small-group protocols, “Three Before Me” and “Reciprocal Teaching.” Protocols direct students to independently respond to a text-based question, or respond to a text-based prompt, then discuss via protocol-specific structured discussions. In “Three Before Me,” students share their writing with peers, then peer review/edit each other’s writing. In “Reciprocal Teaching,” students create text-based discussion prompts, then offer these prompts to their small group for discussion. As a support for their conversations, students are directed to the Speaking and Listening Studio to learn about “Collaborative Discussions.” Also in Unit 3, students adapt their explanatory essays into multimedia presentations. Students gather and create audio and visual materials to engage their audience, plan their presentations, and then practice with a partner or small group before presenting to the class. The teacher gives instructions to the listener and the presenter. The teacher is instructed to discuss general principles for presenting, and the Speaking and Listening Studio is available for additional instruction. 

In Unit 5, students participate in a similar activity in which students independently respond to a text-based question. This unit activity uses the protocols “Three Minute Review” and “Questioning the Author.”

3.d Inquiry and Research

3.d.1
Materials engage students in both short-term and sustained recursive inquiry processes to confront and analyze various aspects of a topic using relevant sources.

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Evaluation for 3.d.1
Materials engage students in both short-term and sustained recursive inquiry processes to confront and analyze various aspects of a topic using relevant sources.

The materials engage students in both short-term and sustained recursive inquiry processes to confront and analyze various aspects of a topic using relevant sources. Materials support identification and summary of high-quality primary and secondary sources. Students practice organizing and presenting their ideas and information in accordance with the purpose of the research and the appropriate grade-level audience.

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students engage with both primary and secondary resources as they conduct short-term and sustained inquiry processes to research and analyze aspects of various topics. After reading “What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret, students research traditional tales that include talking animals and the rule of three and compare them to the text. Students also read “Without Title” by Diane Glancy and gather information from at least three sources to research changes that happened in the lives of Native Americans. Students evaluate the credibility and accuracy of the information in their selected sources. After reading the Texas v. Johnson Majority Opinion by Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan, students conduct research on other cases that involved challenging court rulings on the basis of the First Amendment. Students then create a multimedia presentation to present their findings to the class. Also in Unit 1, students read “American Flag Stands for Tolerance,” an editorial by Ronald J. Allen. Students then find four online sources with information on flag burning and analyze the sources for credibility, bias, and omissions. They use their research to debate the issue with classmates; afterward, they research and discuss how experts de-escalate heated conflicts while debating. 

In Unit 2, students read Julio Cortázar’s “The Night Face Up” and research Aztec culture, including architecture, education, arts, and economy. Materials provide students with a research tip to document sources and to include the title, author’s name, publisher’s name and location, date of publication, URL, and page numbers. Students confirm the information they find by “checking multiple websites and assessing the credibility of each one.”

In Unit 3, students read “Joyas Voladoras” by Brian Doyle and examine multiple sources to research their own questions about the heart. Materials provide them with an outline to record their question, sources, notes, changes to approaching the question, and final answer. Students write an explanation of the research findings and then participate in a panel discussion about the way that the ideal heart would function, basing their conclusions on their research. 

In Unit 4, students read Rebecca Makkai’s “The Briefcase” and research political imprisonment around the world. Materials remind students to use their findings to “generate, modify, and refine more questions to refocus your research plan.” Materials direct teachers to make sure that students know how to tell if a source is credible by differentiating between objective and subjective articles.

In Unit 5, the summative writing task is to write a research report about a specific way humans respond to changes in the world or in their own lives. Students synthesize the information gained from the texts they read within the unit and are also provided with a mentor text, an excerpt from the popular-science novel, The Fever by Sonia Shah. As they begin the planning phase, they gather evidence from credible print or online sources and use a research report planning chart to record their quotes, facts, sources, and citation information. They then organize their research, develop a draft, discuss and revise, edit (with a focus on crediting sources), publish a final draft, and choose a way to share the report with their audience. 

In Unit 6 of the “Writing Studio,” students learn about conducting research, including how to start the process, how to identify and locate sources, how to conduct field research or internet research, how to take notes, and how to give credit to sources used. The materials provide an explicit definition of primary and secondary sources and include multiple examples with pictures. Each example has an explanation of why the source is primary or secondary. The Studio also explains why to use a primary source and how to match sources to research questions. Later in Unit 6, students read scenes from William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth and record annotations about how and when the author uses drama conventions and character development. Students then conduct research using secondary sources in order to explore answers to questions that they generated while reading the play. Materials provide students with a research tip to check the websites of publishers of Shakespeare’s plays for information about Shakespeare’s works. Students complete a graphic organizer called a “Character Diagram,” in which students use their annotations to “sum up the role and outcomes” of the characters in the play. The materials then prompt students: “Have a discussion about the drama’s relationships and events based on the character diagram you created.” 

3.e Integration of ELAR Skills

Evaluation for 3.e.1
Materials contain interconnected tasks that build student knowledge and provide opportunities for increased independence.

The materials contain interconnected tasks that build student knowledge and provide opportunities for increased independence. Questions and tasks are designed to help students build and apply knowledge and skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, thinking, and language. Text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge and ideas within individual texts as well as across multiple texts are included in the materials. Tasks integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening, and thinking and include components of vocabulary, syntax, and fluency.

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students read “What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret and then work in small groups to research other traditional tales with talking animals and the rule of three. They record their findings in a graphic organizer and discuss, “In what ways are the talking animals similar and different? What kinds of events, characters, or details appear in groups of three?” Groups extend their thinking by writing a summary of their conclusions and comparing Keret’s story with their researched stories. 

In Unit 2, Annie Dillard’s “Total Eclipse” is followed by “Analyze the Text” questions to which students respond with evidence from the text; questions include “What historical allusions does the author make? How do these allusions contribute to the tone of the essay?” In the “Write and Share” activity, students apply writing skills by writing a two-paragraph comparison of Dillard’s description and an eyewitness account of the 2017 eclipse that students researched; students apply speaking and listening skills by discussing the question of why eclipses still capture the human imagination even now that we have a better understanding of them. In the “Language Conventions” activity, students apply language skills by analyzing Dillard’s use of sentence variety and then use sentence variety to write a description of a strange experience they had.

In Unit 5, students read and compare a poem, “Sonnets to Orpheus, Part Two, XII” by Rainer Maria Rilke, and an excerpt from the documentary film Rivers and Tides by Thomas Riedelsheimer. In groups, they discuss the poem’s and the documentary’s themes. They record their answers in a chart and then discuss questions that require text-based evidence, such as “What similarities do you see between Andy Goldsworthy’s ideas about using nature to make art and the ideas presented in the poem? What have you learned from these sources together about how changes in nature affect humans?” For the documentary, students answer the question “What special effect does the film use to help the viewer link the sculptures to the idea of time and changes over time?” In the “Create and Discuss” activity for Rivers and Tides and “Sonnets to Orpheus, Part Two, XII,” students apply writing skills by journaling about the connections they can make between changes observed in nature or in their community and the kinds of major life changes people experience. In the “Compare and Present” activity, students apply speaking and listening skills by working with a group to create and deliver a presentation comparing the view on change in both works.

Evaluation for 3.e.2
Materials provide spiraling and scaffolded practice.

The materials provide spiraling and scaffolded practice by supporting distributed practice over the course of the year, including scaffolds for students to demonstrate integration of literacy skills that spiral over the school year.

Examples include but are not limited to:

The materials provide students with multiple opportunities to practice listening and speaking skills throughout the units. In Unit 1, for the “Create and Present” post-reading activity for “What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret, students write and present a fable to the class. Students also engage in small-group discussions, present a narrative, and debate an issue. Then, as Unit 2’s summative writing task, students create a short story and convert this story into a podcast. Speaking and listening is reinforced in Unit 4. In the “Create and Present” activity for the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr., the materials prompt: “Give a brief, formal speech that shares what you learned about the Civil Rights leader you researched.” In Unit 6, students read William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and engage in a small-group discussion on Lady Macbeth’s actions in Act 2; students also participate in a debate about the essential plot elements of Act 4. The multiple opportunities to participate in various types of text-based speaking and listening activities, like peer discussions, presentations, and debates or panel discussions, provide distributed practice with these literacy skills in a systematic way throughout the year.

The materials direct students to use the “Notice and Note” reading model as an annotation method during their reading. In Unit 2, students read “Total Eclipse” by Annie Dillard. For the Dillard text, these annotations include “Contrasts and Contradictions,” “Extreme or Absolute Language,” and “Questioning Stance.” Students look out for phrases or language within the text that demonstrate a contrast or contradiction; then, they identify the contrast or contradiction and ask themselves why it matters. Students also look for “Extreme or Absolute Language,” then “pause, mark it in their consumable text, and ask themselves the anchor question: Why did the author use this language?” Materials also prompt students to keep a question in their mind when reading: “What did the author think I already knew?” The materials offer students exemplars for each of these three annotation and reading strategies. Students use these annotations to respond to the reading’s “Essential Question.” Students use a response log provided in the student materials. This pattern of using reading strategies, annotation methods, and graphic organizers to collect annotations that will then be used to respond to the essential question repeats. Unit 4 also prompts students to apply these strategies. Students use an “Analyze Poetic Structure Annotation Model” when reading Derek Walcott’s “Elsewhere,” then use these annotations to respond to the unit-specific essential question. In Unit 6, as students read through the assigned acts from Shakespeare’s Macbeth, they annotate using an “Analyze Drama” annotation model. Students are given an exemplar for this model before beginning the reading. Then, in the post-reading activity, students use their annotations to respond to the unit’s essential question. To further reinforce these strategies, methods, and tasks, materials repeat this pattern throughout other units.

Rubric Section 4Developing and Sustaining Foundational Literacy SkillsGrades 3-5 OnlyNot applicable for this grade level.

Rubric Section 5Supports for All LearnersHow well do the materials support teachers in meeting the needs of students with diverse learning needs?TotalTOTAL100% (6 out of 6 points)100%80% Recommended

Section 5Supports for All LearnersHow well do the materials support teachers in meeting the needs of students with diverse learning needs?Total100% (6 out of 6 points)

Evaluation for 5.1
Materials include supports for students who demonstrate proficiency above grade level.

The materials include supports for students who demonstrate proficiency above grade level. Planning and learning opportunities, including extensions and differentiation, are provided for students who demonstrate literacy skills above that expected at the grade level.

Examples include but are not limited to:

In Unit 1, students read the memoir “By Any Other Name” by Santha Rama Rau. The “To Challenge Students” section of the teacher’s edition includes an extension activity: Consider another perspective by summarizing the events that occurred in the memoir from the mother’s point of view. Students consider questions such as “How do events reflect the mother’s comment about British schools in paragraph 6? How do you think she responded to what she learned from Premila about the first day of school (paragraphs 23–25)? Why do you think Rama Rau describes her as ‘very distant,’ ‘silent,’ and ‘displeased’ in paragraph 40?” Then, students share their summaries with a partner or small group, looking for similarities and differences between their summaries and Rau’s own account.

In Unit 2, students read the short story “The Night Face Up” by Julio Cortázar. The “To Challenge Students” section of the teacher’s edition includes an extension activity: Analyze point of view and consider “what the woman or one of the men who helped the crash victim might have thought about the accident.” Students are challenged to create a short monologue in which they describe the events from a minor character’s perspective. Alternatively, students can work in small groups to develop skits in which each student acts as a different character and describes the event from that character’s point of view. The “To Challenge Students” box in the “Teacher Wrap” for Sylvia Plath’s “Mirror” suggests students compare the poem to folklore by exploring the idea that some cultures believe that mirrors can be a portal for souls. Students respond to the questions “In what sense could it be said that a soul has entered the mirror?” and “In what sense could it be said that a soul is lurking in the mirror?”

In Unit 3, students read “Joyas Voladoras,” an essay by Brian Doyle. The “To Challenge Students” section of the teacher’s edition includes an extension activity: Create a multimodal presentation. Students work with a partner to reread the selection and find instances of surprising facts or startling imagery. Students then research and collect photographs, music, or videos that would support the facts and images in the story. Students work together to create their presentation, pairing text from the selection with the images and other multi-modal media they found. Students also read “My Life as a Bat” by Margaret Atwood. In the “Research” post-reading activity, students conduct research on an aspect of the bat’s life, like its habitat, food choices, or behaviors. For an “Extend” activity, students compare their research findings to descriptions of bats in the story, then evaluate the accuracy of the story and identify how misconceptions have affected the perception of bats.

In Unit 6, students read The Tragedy of Macbeth by William Shakespeare. The “To Challenge Students” section of the teacher’s edition includes an extension activity: Portray complex characters by adding stage directions to a scene from the play. Students must pay attention to details that help them visualize the characters’ feelings, actions, and appearances in order to write detailed stage directions and portray the characters in their own unique way. The “To Challenge Students” box of the “Teacher Wrap” for Act 2 of William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth suggests students discuss why the events of Act 2, Scene 3, would have shocked Shakespeare’s audience. Students can “briefly research the concept of the divine right of kings and of regicide in Elizabethan times,” consider how the play’s themes are related to Macduff’s statement about confusion, and think about the effect of having the king’s murder take place off stage.

Evaluation for 5.2
Materials include supports for students who perform below grade level to ensure they are meeting the grade-level literacy standards.

The materials include supports for students who perform below grade level to ensure they are meeting the grade-level literacy standards. Planning and learning opportunities, including extensions and differentiation, are provided for students who demonstrate literacy skills below that expected at the grade level.

Examples include but are not limited to:

In the “Teacher Wrap” for each selection there is a box labeled “When Students Struggle,” which presents suggestions for helping students demonstrating proficiency below grade level. In addition, the materials include the “Reading Studio,” an online resource that includes targeted lessons on reading fluency and reading comprehension instruction. 

In Unit 1, the “When Students Struggle” box in the “Teacher Wrap” for Diane Glancy’s poem “Without Title” suggests students struggling with setting can create a chart in which they track details related to setting. Students consider three specific types of details to look for: the father’s heritage, his present, and reminders of his heritage. For additional support, teachers can use the Reading Studio and assign the “Level Up Tutorial” on “Setting.” In the lesson on “By Any Other Name” by Santha Rama Rau, the materials provide teachers, in the teacher’s edition, with a “Teach” section containing differentiation strategies targeted toward a variety of learners. The materials for this reading include a sidebar for “When Students Struggle,” which targets analyzing historical context, a skill taught during this lesson. The strategy is for students to produce a graphic organizer contrasting British and Indian cultural traditions. The sidebar also suggests that teachers assign a tutorial from the Reading Studio, the “Level Up Tutorial: Historical and Cultural Context.” 

In Unit 2, students read “Total Eclipse” by Annie Dillard. The materials offer supports in the “When Students Struggle” sections, which guide students through complicated passages, provide clarification of the author’s meaning, identify descriptive word choices, and help visualize the setting.

In Unit 3, the “When Students Struggle” box in the “Teacher Wrap” for Brian Doyle’s essay “Joyas Voladoras” suggests students struggling with determining meaning can reread each paragraph and note in a chart the facts that they learn. They then reread each paragraph and record how the details in the paragraph make them feel about the subject. For additional support, the materials advise teachers to go to the Reading Studio and assign the “Level Up Tutorial” on “Main Idea and Supporting Details.”

In Unit 4, students read “The Hawk Can Soar,” a memoir by Randi Davenport. The “When Students Struggle” section of the teacher’s edition directs teachers to read aloud the first couple of paragraphs and model how they monitor their own understanding by pausing, paraphrasing, clarifying, asking questions, and rereading. Teachers suggest that students pause to monitor comprehension after specific paragraphs and at the end of the selection. For additional support, the teacher can assign students the Reading Studio’s “Level Up Tutorial” on “Paraphrasing and Summarizing.” For “The Briefcase” by Rebecca Makkai, a “Teach” section provides teachers with differentiation strategies targeted toward a variety of learners. The materials include a “When Students Struggle” for students who might struggle with the author’s style, and particularly with the author’s use of grammar. The materials provide strategies to help students practice relating grammatical choices to an author’s purpose. Additional strategies include setting a reading purpose, making a graphic organizer, and providing a question that will frame students’ thinking while reading. Teachers can also assign students a “Level Up Tutorial” on “Author’s Style” from the Reading Studio. 

In Unit 5, students read “A Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury. In the “When Students Struggle” section of the teacher’s edition, one support given is for student pairs to contrast settings by examining the difference in the “present” that is at the beginning of the story and the “present” that is at the end of the story. Students use a T-chart to record details that they can share during a class discussion. For additional support, teachers can assign the Reading Studio’s “Level Up Tutorial: Setting.” For Sonia Shah’s The Fever, the materials advise teachers to have students struggling with organizational patterns review the cause-and-effect text structure and trace the development of the malaria parasite with a partner. For additional support, teachers are advised to go to the Reading Studio and assign the “Level Up Tutorial” on “Cause-and-Effect Organization.”

Evaluation for 5.3
Materials include supports for English Learners (EL) to meet grade-level learning expectations.

The materials include supports for English Learners (ELs) to meet grade-level learning expectations. Accommodations for linguistics commensurate with various levels of English language proficiency as defined by the ELPS are included. Materials provide various scaffolds, such as Spanish translations of essential components of each unit, pictures and realia, and cognates for unit vocabulary. Students are encouraged to use their first language as a means to linguistic, affective, cognitive, and academic development in English. Vocabulary is developed in the context of connected discourse.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Each selection is preceded by a “Text X-Ray: ELPS Support” section. According to the description provided at the beginning of this section, the Text X-Ray “provides support for the four domains of English language development addressed in the English Language Proficiency Standards.” In this document, teachers are given pre-reading strategies, cultural resources, and instructional strategies that can be used to target the different domains of the English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), which include listening, speaking, writing, and reading. Each ELPS domain gets its own content box. Within each box are supports that are targeted toward a specific ELPS proficiency level. 

The “Reading Studio,” has a Spanish translation for the “Essential Question,” reading response log, academic vocabulary, and summaries for each selection.

In Unit 1, for the lesson on the poem “Without Title” by Diane Glancy, the sidebar box for “Speaking” provides strategies that teachers can implement for the “Beginning,” “Intermediate,” “High,” and “Advanced High” EL students. An example of strategy for an EL student who is at the Beginning level for speaking is to use “a series of labeled pictures” to present their narrative inspired by the poem; then, students work on pronouncing the labels for their pictures. To prepare students for analyzing internal conflict by identifying tough questions, the EL support box in the “Teacher Wrap” for “What, of this Goldfish, Would You Wish?” by Etgar Keret suggests students should “identify signals used in their home languages to let listeners know that they are asking a tough question.” In the EL support box in the “Teacher Wrap” for Santha Rama Rau’s “By Any Other Name,” students practice articulating foreign words such as status quo, deja-vu, avant-garde, and coup d’etat in isolation, and then as part of the sentences in which they appear in the selection. Students then work with a partner or in a small group to create and share original sentences using these terms.   

In Unit 2, for “Total Eclipse” by Annie Dillard, the “Text X-Ray: ELPS Support” for “Listening” suggests having Beginning ELs listen and sketch the scene as the teacher reads a highly descriptive paragraph from the selection. Intermediate ELs are asked to draw and label what they heard, using vocabulary from the passage. Advanced ELs quick-write about what they heard. Advanced High ELs take notes as they listen, then compare with a partner what they imagined as they listened. EL students also practice working with synonyms by looking at phrases in paragraph 15 that describe the shadow of the moon during an eclipse, including “a piece of sky” and “an abrupt black body out of nowhere.” Students describe these details in their primary language and then in English, using synonyms to clarify their understanding. 

In Unit 3, the “Text X-Ray” instructs teachers on how to introduce the lesson, pre-teach vocabulary and cultural terms, and build background for the short story “Joyas Voladoras” by Brian Doyle. The Text X-Ray offers activities and instructional support in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for students at four levels of proficiency: Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced, and Advanced High. For reading “Joyas Voladoras,” the support suggests that students reread paragraph 4. For Beginning ELs, the support is: “Read aloud each sentence and pause after reading it to restate it in simplified language. Then, have students find, circle, and read aloud familiar words.” For Intermediate ELs, materials suggest echo reading, with pauses to paraphrase as necessary; then, partners take turns rereading the paragraph and stating the main idea and important details. For Advanced ELs, partners read the paragraph together and discuss main idea and key details; afterward, they write a short summary together. For Advanced High ELs, the text suggests that “partners read the paragraph silently, then discuss its meaning and work together to write a summary.” In Unit 3, in the EL support box in the “Teacher Wrap” for the “Find Your Park” public service announcement by the National Park Service, materials advise teachers to have students “look at maps, signs, or other environmental print in the classroom” and identify basic vocabulary and familiar features and images.

In Unit 4, students read an excerpt from Mohandas K. Gandhi’s “Letter to Viceroy, Lord Irwin.” During this lesson, in the “Teach” section of the teacher’s edition—a section that provides teachers with instructional strategies, differentiation strategies, and other resources to help teachers deliver instruction during the lesson—materials provide teachers with resources for EL students. For instance, during the part of the lesson that introduces the critical vocabulary for the readings, a sidebar section is devoted to “English Learner Support.” The materials provide teachers with cognates for the critical vocabulary words. Materials prompt teachers to share these with EL students. For the poem “Elsewhere” by Derek Walcott, the “Text X-Ray: ELPS Support” for “Writing” suggests supporting Beginning ELs by providing sentence stems, such as “I think this poem would make readers…. I believe this because…. The phrase…makes me feel….” Teachers can support Intermediate ELs in their use of grade-level vocabulary by providing them with academic terms to be used in their analysis, including theme, motif, stanza, and rhyme. Advanced ELs review a peer’s written analysis for clarity of ideas and grammar usage. Advanced High ELs review a peer’s written analysis for use of connecting words. Materials also provide Spanish translations of the essential components of a unit. For Unit 4, materials offer a PDF version of the unit’s essential components in Spanish. Materials provide, in Spanish, the unit’s “Essential Question,” the unit response log and directions, the unit’s  academic vocabulary graphic organizer exemplar and directions, summaries of all the unit’s texts, and a glossary of academic vocabulary. 

In Unit 5, in the “Text X-Ray: ELPS Support” section in the teacher’s edition for Sonia Shah’s The Fever, materials suggest that teachers support reading by showing Beginning ELs pictures of a barnacle and a crab prior to reading paragraph 5. In the EL support box in the “Teacher Wrap” for Ray Bradbury’s “A Sound of Thunder,” students look at the image of a sign embedded in the story and “state the meaning of the sign, first in their primary language and then in English.” 

In Unit 6, in the EL support box in the “Teacher Wrap” for William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth, students develop vocabulary related to rank and power by referring to a chart that lists words for royalty and nobility and words for the military, as they take turns asking and answering questions like “Who leads an army?” or “Who would be higher in rank, an earl, or a prince?” 

Rubric Section 6ImplementationHow user-friendly are the materials and how do they support students, teachers and administrators in assuring strong implementation?TotalTOTAL100% (8 out of 8 points)100%80% Recommended

Section 6ImplementationHow user-friendly are the materials and how do they support students, teachers and administrators in assuring strong implementation?Total100% (8 out of 8 points)

Evaluation for 6.1
Materials include assessment and guidance for teachers and administrators to monitor progress including how to interpret and act on data yielded.

The materials include assessment and guidance for teachers and administrators to monitor progress, including how to interpret and act on data yielded. The formative and summative assessments are aligned in purpose, intended use, and TEKS emphasis. The assessments and scoring information provide sufficient guidance for interpreting and responding to student performance. The assessments are connected to the regular content to support student learning throughout the materials. 

Examples include but are not limited to:

In the “Assessment tab” on the main page, there are links to several online assessments, including diagnostic assessments for literary elements, like “Plot and Setting,” “Comparing Themes,” and “Irony and Ambiguity.” The “Level Up Tutorials” also contain online assessments, and objective summative assessments are available for each reading selection. For each of these online assessments, teachers can access printable versions with answer keys that denote the TEKS and Depth of Knowledge (DoK) level for each question.

The materials formatively assess “Comprehension,” “Analysis,” “Research,” “Writing,” “Speaking and Listening,” “Vocabulary,” and “Language” skills with each reading selection. As students read a selection, they answer specific, TEKS-aligned questions that assess their understanding during and after the reading process. Teachers examine online individual student notes and answers to assess their understanding of the reading. Students also answer multiple-choice text-related questions in the “Check Your Understanding” section at the end of each text (or embedded within the selection for the online version). Post-reading, each selection contains an “Analyze the Text” section where students respond to questions. The students then take a selection test, online or printed, with a series of multiple-choice and short-answer questions. In Unit 5, students read “A Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury. The selection’s test has 12 items that are a mix of multiple-choice, short-answer, and technology-enhanced items. Students can reference the text as they answer questions. Questions include the following: “Why is the discussion about President Keith in the opening scene important to the success of the story’s plot? How does the final scene tie the plot together? Use specific examples from the text.”

Unit tests, in STAAR-like format, provide an array of data aligned to the TEKS. Teachers can view reports that detail student performance, item analysis, time spent testing, and assessment proficiency. The auto-grouping function allows teachers to group students according to instructional decisions. Unit tasks in “Writing” unit tests provide summative assessments aligned to the TEKS at the end of each unit and require students to demonstrate multiple skills learned throughout the unit. In Unit 3, the unit test includes an excerpt from “The Crowning of Arthur” from Le Morte d’Arthur by Sir Thomas Mallory. The students read the passage and answer questions such as “How does the scene in which Arthur returns to the lodging to retrieve Sir Kay’s sword (paragraph 6) contribute to the success of the plot as a whole?” The Unit 3 test also contains the nonfiction passage “River Revival: Transforming the Thames” by Christine Graf. The students read the passage and answer questions such as “Which statement best expresses how the structure of the essay serves the author’s purpose?” There is also a “Revising and Editing” passage with questions that correlate with the unit’s grammar skills. The Unit 3 summative test is 44 multiple-choice questions. The practice passages give students the opportunity to transfer and apply what they have learned from the unit. 

Materials provide “Summative Writing Tasks” aligned to the skills and knowledge taught during the unit and to the TEKS emphasized in the unit. For the “Writing” task in Unit 5, students write a research report in which they include “Quoted Words” (an element that students looked for when reading selections throughout the unit). Students apply grammar conventions studied in the unit as they edit their stories. The “Teacher Wrap” denotes the TEKS assessed for each component of the writing task. For Unit 6, one of the “Unit Learning Objectives” is to “Write a Literary Analysis.” For the Summative Writing Task, students write a literary analysis essay. The materials guide students through this task via activities that correspond to each step of the writing process: prompt, plan, develop, revise, edit, and publish. The literary analysis essay genre is aligned with the TEKS, which expects students to write explanatory essays and reports using genre characteristics. The TEKS-aligned writing process includes expectations that students compose a text using the planning, developing, revising, editing, and publishing steps of the writing process. 

Sours: https://texasresourcereview.org/programs/hmh-literature-english-ii

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