Bradley edwards claremont

Bradley edwards claremont DEFAULT

Detectives believe Claremont killer visited victim's grave but avoided CCTV trap, new book reveals

This was published 8 months ago

Detectives believe Claremont killer Bradley Edwards visited Ciara Glennon's grave three years after her death and left behind an item of her underwear, sparking a covert police operation, according to a new book released on Wednesday.

The garment was found by one of Ms Glennon’s family members visiting the Karrakatta Cemetery site in late November 2000, 3½ years after the 27-year-old became the third woman to be snatched off the streets of Claremont and murdered.

The underwear, later DNA-linked to Ms Glennon and bearing her handwritten initials on the tag, was suspected to have been a spare pair inside the lawyer’s missing work bag, which she had with her the night she vanished.

The bag, along with Ms Glennon’s shoes, jacket and brooch, have never been recovered.

Police set up a covert camera at the cemetery in the hopes her killer would return to her grave again, but Edwards evaded the trap and remained off the radar for another 16 years.

The incident occurred a month before Edwards married his second wife.

The revelation is one of many about the Claremont killings case published for the first time in veteran journalist Bret Christian’s book, Stalking Claremont: Inside the hunt for a serial killer.

Released on Wednesday, the book also uncovers a series of incidents of a teenage boy matching Edwards’ description masturbating in front of people in public in the mid-1980s.

It recounts young mother Glenys Newport’s encounter near Huntingdale with a teen she is sure was Edwards, although the crime has never been solved and no charges ever laid.

“He rode past us [on his bicycle], then rode down the embankment at the side of the bridge, put down his bike and looked back at me and masturbated,” Ms Newport said.

“He looked me in the eye – he was doing it to me.

“The police back then were very interested – they said other people had reported the same teenager, but that they had been unable to catch him.”

Edwards, who lived in Huntingdale, would have been 16 at the time of the offence and matched Ms Newport’s description to police of a teenage boy with dark hair parted on his right side, wearing glasses.

It follows other incidents in Edwards’ youth, including a family friend recalling when she believed Edwards had entered her bedroom during a barbecue and stolen some of her underwear.

Others in the streets surrounding Edwards’ childhood home reported underwear and women’s nightgowns going missing from clothes lines.

After his arrest, police discovered a box of women’s underwear with holes cut out of the crotch, home-made sex toys, and plastic sandwich bags containing Edwards’ semen.

Ex-girlfriends who came forward to police after the shock arrest in 2016 were asked by detectives of the former Telstra worker’s sexual habits with some recounting he had an "exceptionally thin penis", according to excerpts from Stalking Claremont.

Former brothel madam Linda Watson said she believed Edwards was one of her clients in 1994 and 1995 – around the same time his first marriage was breaking down.

“It’s made me sick in the stomach,” she told Christian, after eyeing Edwards in court.

“I’m sure it was him. When I saw him on the screen, the hairs on my arms stood up.

“His face is different but you never forget the eyes – piercing, cold eyes but a nice personality. He came and had coffee with me in my office upstairs.

“He was not violent – quite the opposite, polite and calm, a gentleman. He was not an ‘ugly mug’, the label working girls pin on aggressive clients.”

Stalking Claremont also reveals more than 20 attacks on women in the Claremont area later linked to the suspected Claremont serial killer before Edwards’ arrest, and the reasons police concentrated their efforts on three innocent men, and missed the real killer, for decades.

Edwards was found guilty of murdering Jane Rimmer, 23, and Ms Glennon in September 2020 and was sentenced to a minimum 40-year prison term.

He was acquitted of the murder of Sarah Spiers, his alleged first victim. The 18-year-old’s body has never been found.

Stalking Claremont is an ABC Books publication in conjunction with HarperCollins Australia.

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Sours: https://www.watoday.com.au/national/western-australia/detectives-believe-claremont-killer-visited-victim-s-grave-but-avoided-cctv-trap-new-book-reveals-20210119-p56va8.html

Claremont killings: Bradley Robert Edwards chooses not to appeal conviction or sentence for murder

Claremont killer Bradley Robert Edwards has declined to appeal his conviction or life sentence for murdering two women in Perth in the 1990s.

A courts spokesman has confirmed that the West Australian Court of Appeal had not received a notice of appeal from Edwards by the deadline of 4pm on Wednesday.

Edwards, who terrorised Perth’s suburbs for almost a decade, will now almost certainly die behind bars after being jailed in December for at least 40 years and described by the judge as a ruthless predator of vulnerable women.

The 52-year-old was convicted in September of abducting and killing childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, and solicitor Ciara Glennon, 27, in 1996 and 1997.

He was acquitted of the 1996 murder of 18-year-old secretary Sarah Spiers.

All three women disappeared after a night out with friends in affluent Claremont, with the bodies of Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon discovered in bushland weeks after they were killed.

Ms Spiers’ body has never been found but Justice Stephen Hall said the confessed rapist’s propensity for violent abductions made it likely that he also killed Ms Spiers.

Edwards pleaded guilty on the eve of his trial to sexually assaulting two young women in 1988 and 1995.

He showed no emotion after receiving his life sentence, which was greeted with applause in the public gallery including family members of his victims.

Justice Hall described Edwards as a dangerous predator who had sought out vulnerable young women and attacked them for his own gratification.

“Your actions were premeditated and executed with pitiless determination and remorselessness for the pain caused,” he told Edwards.

Edwards’ 40-year minimum term is the longest ever imposed in WA. He will be 88 by the time he is eligible for parole.

The court heard Edwards, who opted not to give evidence during his seven-month trial, had declined to participate in a psychiatric report which might have provided insight into why he carried out his heinous crimes.

Edwards committed his first known attack on women in 1988, breaking into the Huntingdale home of an 18-year-old acquaintance and indecently assaulting her as she slept.

It provided the crucial piece of evidence homicide detectives needed to arrest him almost 29 years later.

The telco today acknowledged the enormous harm and grief many people had experienced due to the Claremont killer's’ “dreadful acts”.

He’d left behind a semen-stained silk kimono stolen from a washing line and when it was finally tested in November 2016, DNA matched swabs taken from a teenager he abducted from Claremont then raped at nearby Karrakatta Cemetery in 1995.

It also matched cellular material found under Ms Glennon’s fingernails, gathered during a violent struggle shortly before her death.

Fibre evidence established that both murder victims had been in Edwards’ Telstra work vehicle shortly before their deaths.

Both young women had died fighting for their lives, Justice Hall said.

Sours: https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/claremont-serial-killings/claremont-killings-bradley-robert-edwards-chooses-not-to-appeal-conviction-or-sentence-for-murder-ng-b881787205z
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Claremont killer Bradley Edwards gets life sentence for murder of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon

Claremont killer Bradley Edwards has been told he will most likely die in jail as he was sentenced to life imprisonment for the wilful murders of two young women in a notorious case that shocked the city of Perth.

Key points:

  • Bradley Edwards faces a minimum of 40 years behind bars
  • It is the longest ever non-parole period in WA judicial history
  • Edwards was also sentenced for sexually motivated attacks

Spontaneous applause broke out in the public gallery as WA Supreme Court Justice Stephen Hall sentenced Edwards to a minimum of 40 years behind bars for the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon in the mid 1990s, bringing an end to one of the darkest chapters in the state's history.

"I recognise that there is a high likelihood that you will die in prison," Justice Hall said as he delivered the verdict.

A court sketch headshot and photo headshot of two men.

"You were a dangerous predator who sought out vulnerable young women and attacked them for your own gratification.

"You targeted unsuspecting women who were usually completely unknown to you.

"Your actions were premeditated, executed with pitiless determination and you were remorseless in your disregard for the pain and suffering that you caused."

Who were the Claremont victims?

It is the longest non-parole period ever handed out by a WA court.

Justice Hall said Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon had loving families, good jobs and had much to live for.

Victims 'robbed of their dreams'

"By your actions, you robbed [the victims] of their lives, their hopes, their dreams and the dreams others had for them," he said.

"For parents, the death of a child is always an unspeakable tragedy.

"To have a child taken and killed in the prime of their life is every parent's worst nightmare … [and the] effects are profound and long lasting."

Ciara Glennon's father Denis walks in front of a Perth court. He looks very grave.

The sentencing of Edwards marks the end of a seven-month criminal trial — thought to be the state's longest and most expensive ever—that began in November last year and spanned hundreds of witnesses, thousands of exhibits and an entire floor of the public prosecutor's offices to accommodate the huge volume of evidence amassed.

Edwards, 52, murdered Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon in 1996 and 1997 after snatching them from the streets of Claremont late at night in eerily similar circumstances that Justice Hall said "inspired a real and pervasive sense of fear" in the community.

Using his work vehicle, a Telstra-issued Holden Commodore station wagon, Edwards drove both women to separate but equally remote areas of the city's fringe, where he stabbed them repeatedly in the neck and upper body, before partially covering their bodies with branches stripped from nearby trees.

Both bodies went undiscovered for weeks and were only found by sheer chance, with the passage of time likely destroying vital evidence that might have incriminated Edwards.

A young woman bending down in a park near a creek.

Yet enough tiny shreds were left behind to ultimately convict the twice-married Edwards, most notably an infinitesimal speck of his DNA that was lodged underneath Ms Glennon's fingernails as she tried to fight off the large-framed technician, who would have towered over the diminutive lawyer.

This crucial scrap of biological material was only discovered in 2009, more than a decade after her brutal murder, by a team of highly specialised forensic scientists on the other side of the world, at the UK's Forensic Science Service, where the samples had been sent by WA Police who were desperate for a breakthrough.

The case against Edwards was further bolstered by a swathe of fibre evidence that showed both women had been in Edwards's car shortly before they were slain.

Edwards was convicted by Justice Hall in September of murdering 23-year-old Ms Rimmer and 27-year-old Ms Glennon.

But there was not enough evidence to convict him of the murder of 18-year-old Sarah Spiers, who was also taken from Claremont late at night in a similar fashion in January 1996, although Justice Hall ruled that Edwards was her likely killer.

Mr Spiers looks down. He wears a brown tie and cap and checked shirt.

Edwards was also sentenced for the abduction and repeated rape of a 17-year-old he snatched from Claremont as she walked home alone at night, 16 months before he murdered Ms Rimmer.

The terrified teenager had her hands and feet bound with cables and her head covered by a hood before being bundled into the back of a van and driven to Karrakatta Cemetery, where she was sexually attacked violently.

He was also sentenced for breaking into the home of another teenager, an 18-year-old he assaulted while subjecting her to a terrifying ordeal as she lay in her bed in Huntingdale, with her parents in the next room.
Edwards finally confessed to both attacks on the eve of his murder trial, despite earlier protesting his innocence.

His sentence for those attacks will be served concurrently with the murder sentences.

Justice for 'sadistic' and 'evil' killer

Outside court, police commissioner Chris Dawson said it was a "momentous day" in which an "evil man" had been jailed.

"Edwards is a killer, a sadistic rapist who preyed on innocent women," he said.

"He devastated families and tormented the West Australian community.

"The jailing of Edwards means the community is now safe from this terrible person.

"It is my sincere hope … that Edwards will never be released from prison."

Headshot of Sarah Spiers.

He said WA Police would never give up trying to solve Ms Spiers's murder and would continue to question Edwards about it.

"The quest for justice for Sarah will continue," he said.

While the families of the three murdered women did not speak outside court, Commissioner Dawson said they were satisfied that justice had been done.

Ciara Glennon

He said Edwards's sentence was the longest ever non-parole period in WA judicial history.

"I think it reflects the severity and gravity of the crimes," he said.

'Stance of denial' noted by judge

Justice Hall said Edwards had refused to participate in a psychiatric assessment, telling him: "I can only assume you retain a stance of denial", with regard to the murders.

He said Edwards's demeanour at court and in the police interview after his arrest showed he was a "stoic and controlled person" who "maintained a calm and unemotional demeanour throughout the trial"

A sketch of an expressionless man wearing glasses, a white shirt and tie

The judge said he came across as intelligent in the interview, and gave "spontaneous and plausible" denials of the allegations against him later found to be true, which helped explain how he was able to lead an "overtly unremarkable life" while committing atrocious crimes.

But while there were aggravating factors to each of the offences, Justice Hall said there was not enough evidence to show Edwards was a continuing threat to the community, or that a "drastic and exceptional" non-release order should be made.

Edwards's defence team has until February 3 to lodge and appeal.

Claremont serial killings — more on this story

Sours: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-12-23/claremont-killer-sentenced-for-murders-rape-and-sexual-assault/13007890
THE CLAREMONT SERIAL KILLER: CAUGHT AFTER 20 YEARS?

Claremont serial killer Bradley Edwards jailed for life

Claremont serial killer Bradley Edwards will spend at least 40 years behind bars after he was given a life sentence today.

Edwards, 51, was found guilty in September of the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon in 1996 and 1997 respectively.

He was acquitted of the murder of Sarah Spiers, whose body has not been found since she vanished in 1996.

Edwards had earlier admitted to the rape of a teenager at Karrakatta Cemetery in 1995 and a sex attack in Huntingdale in 1988.

In his remarks handing down the sentence, Justice Stephen Hall said Edwards struck him as a "stoic and controlled person" who had "led an overtly ordinary life" during the period of his crimes.

Justice Hall said the 1995 rape had been carried out with "remorseless efficiency".

The murders of Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon, he said, had ended the lives of two people who were well-loved.

"By your actions you not only robbed them of their lives, but their hopes, their dreams and the dreams of others for them," he said.

He said Edwards was a "dangerous predator" who was who was "remorseless in your disregard for the pain and suffering that you caused".

He told Edwards he had robbed Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon of their lives, hopes, and dreams.

Though Justice Hall said he had not found it necessary to impose a no-release order, he said there was was a "high likelihood" Edwards would die in jail.

The killer had pleaded not guilty to the murder charges.

Edwards refused to look at his surviving two victims today as they read their victim statements in court ahead of sentencing.

"I hope you are treated as well in prison as you have treated us ... I will live and you won't," the woman attacked by Edwards in Karrakatta Cemetery said.

READ MORE:Father speaks after Claremont verdict

Bradley Edwards at Claremont Killings trial

The Huntingdale victim said she was a "survivor".

"Every night of my life I fall asleep with the fear someone will attack me," she told the court.

"Bradley Edwards now features as the villain of my nightmares and I can't make it stop."

WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson spoke outside court following the sentencing.

"We have witnessed the jailing of an evil man," he said.

"Edwards is a killer. A sadistic rapist who preyed on innocent women.

"He devastated families and tormented the West Australian community."

Mr Dawson said he did not normally comment on sentencing outcomes, but he was determined to make an "exception".

"It is my sincere hope for the sake of victims, for the sake of the families and friends and, indeed, for the safety of our community that Edwards will never be released from prison," he said.

The long investigation

The Claremont serial killings case began in 1996 when Sarah Spiers vanished from the suburb in Perth's west after calling a taxi.

Five months after that, 23-year-old childcare worker Jane Rimmer also disappeared.

And then 27-year-old lawyer Ciara Glennon went missing the following March after a night out with colleagues.

Edwards was brought to trial after a DNA match blew the decades-old cold case wide open.

READ MORE:Secret lover of Claremont killer's first wife speaks out

The DNA sample linked to the Telstra technician was allegedly found under Ciara Glennon's fingernails.

Prosecutors said during the trail that fibres from Edwards' work clothes and his Holden Commodore VS station wagon were found on Ms Rimmer and Ms Glennon.

Fibres were also recovered from a 17-year-old girl Edwards admits twice raping at Karrakatta Cemetery after abducting her from a dark park in Claremont in 1995.

Unanswered questions

WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson welcomed the two guilty verdicts when they were handed down in September, but emphasised that the police investigation into Sarah Spiers' death remains open.

"This is an important day for justice in Western Australia," Mr Dawson said at the time.

"The Claremont killings struck at the heart of our way of life, stretching to become almost a quarter of a century.

"Three innocent young women were killed along with the hopes and dreams they never got to fulfil."

Sours: https://www.9news.com.au/national/claremont-killer-sentencing-bradley-edwards-sentencing/0e502d4a-d7ef-4fd1-9107-bc950f462b09

Edwards claremont bradley

Survivors of Claremont killer Bradley Edwards finally get their day in court at historic sentencing

Claremont killer Bradley Edwards's record 40-year non-parole murder sentence may have made WA judicial history yesterday, but in the end, it was a day that belonged to the two women who survived his sadistic attacks.

Key points:

  • The brave survivors of Edwards's sadistic attacks confronted him in court
  • The women recalled the harrowing effects his actions had on their lives
  • But neither of them would let the attacks define them

Finally, the survivors got their opportunity to tell the court of their ordeals after more than two decades of silent pain, and their voices were deeply moving and incredibly powerful as they stared down their attacker from across the courtroom.

Edwards, 52, received a term of life imprisonment with an unprecedented non-parole period of 40 years for murdering Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon in 1996 and 1997.

For sexually assaulting a teenager at Karrakatta Cemetery in 1995, he received 12 years for each of two counts of rape, and a total of six years for breaking into the home of another teenager in Huntingdale in 1988 and attacking her in her bed.

A head shot of Bradley Robert Edwards.

Victims bravely confront Edwards

Yesterday, those women told their stories in public for the first time, bravely confronting Edwards from the witness box as he stared impassively ahead.

Both women used Edwards's own words to launch eloquent verbal assaults on the man who robbed them of so much, yet who both refused to let it ruin their lives.

"They say you always remember your first. In my case, I consider my first is Chloe."

Karrakatta Cemetery

These were the opening lines of a rape fantasy story found on Edwards's computer that he had edited and possibly written, a story that closely mirrored the experience of the teenager he raped at Karrakatta and the opening lines of her victim impact statement.

The woman, now in her mid-40s, detailed how sick she felt upon hearing of the story, how "a little piece of me broke" and she experienced a severe panic attack.

But in a strong and clear voice as she stared at Edwards across the courtroom, the woman repeated the lines.

"They say you always remember your first. Well in my case Edwards, I consider my first victory is you. You made me strong," she said.

Earlier she recounted the harrowing effect the rape and abduction had continued to have on her life that for many years "kept me caged inside this traumatising experience".

'The most horrific night of my life'

She said she would never fully recover from "the most horrific night of my life", and words like "degraded, captured, unable to breathe, drowning in fear, indescribable fear" did not come close to articulating what she had experienced.

"Not only have I had to face my own mortality, believing I wouldn't survive, then I actually had to survive it," she said.

"My youth was taken from me for no reason."

A tight head and shoulders shot of Ciara Glennon wearing a dark top.

She recounted how she felt she also lost her dignity, security and ability to trust people, and had to frequently revisit the worst parts of the experience as she helped police and prosecutors compile their case.

She spoke of the "deep, gut-wrenching loneliness that literally no-one else can understand" and her ongoing, exhausting fight to lead a normal existence without constantly reliving what happened.

"I will never pretend that night has not had a devastating impact on my life because it has, and it has deeply affected my family," she said.

"But I have always refused to ever let it define me.

"Something can break you, but you can still survive it, and you can thrive, just as I have."

Graphic showing a picture of Jane Rimmer superimposed at the bush grave site in Wellard

Describing her attacker as "inhuman", she said he was a coward who "preyed on weak, vulnerable young women who didn't stand a chance".

"How pathetic," she continued.

"It has been much easier in terms of impact to realise there was no evil genius at work here. He slipped through the cracks because he is unremarkable."

The murder mystery that gripped a city

She said she would never forgive him, and was "completely at peace with that".

"In fact, I will find joy in knowing that you are locked behind bars, without freedom, without choice, suffering for the rest of your life inside your own crippled mind," she said.

"I feel like the rippling effect of pain, for me, can stop now."

"I will leave this courtroom and finally go and live my life without you in it.

"I will live it joyously, respectfully and gratefully for myself, my family and for the lives that were lost.

"I will live and you won't.

"And as one of the victims of your crimes, I hope you are treated as well in prison as you have treated us."

The survivor of the Huntingdale incident — who was attacked in her bed as an 18-year-old by a nightie-clad Edwards in a sexually motivated assault that only stopped when she scratched his face— also threw his words back at him as told the court of her lasting pain.

"To quote Bradley Edwards, I just want to go to sleep and wake up and this will all be a bad dream," she said, referencing Edwards's words in his police interview.

A head and shoulders shot of a smiling Sarah Spiers with long hair and a dark top.

Like the Karrakatta survivor, the woman spoke clearly as she articulated how the trial had "exposed one of the worst moments of my life to the whole world, something I've had no control over".

"At times it has made me feel guilty for being alive and guilty for not having helped police stop Bradley Edwards at the start," she said.

She said her ordeal had left her suffering mental health issues including anxiety and panic attacks, and she was unable to be left alone at home at night.

She said she hated being touched or hugged and had become socially withdrawn.

Victim refuses to be defined by attack

"This has affected all my significant relationships but the saddest one for me is how it has affected my children," she said.

"I have difficulty hugging even them."

A sketch of an expressionless man wearing glasses, a white shirt and tie

But again like the Karrakatta survivor, the 51-year-old said she refused to be defined by her experience.

"I am not a victim," she said.

"I am a survivor and I've had enough."

With the momentous trial now behind them, these courageous women may finally derive a sense of satisfaction that Edwards will likely spend the rest of his life behind bars with little prospect of release.

Claremont serial killings — more on this story

Sours: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-12-24/claremont-killer-bradley-edwards-survivors-have-day-in-court/13011418
The woman who escaped the 'Bogeyman' Claremont serial killer - 60 Minutes Australia

Claremont serial killings

1990s serial murders in Western Australia

Claremont serial killings
OIC claremont hotel 1.jpg

The Claremont Hotel, formerly known as the Continental Hotel, where one of the victims was last seen alive

LocationClaremont, Western Australia
Date27 January 1996 (1996-01-27) -
14 March 1997 (1997-03-14)
Victims2–3
PerpetratorBradley Robert Edwards
Convicted24 September 2020
VerdictGuilty of two counts
Not guilty of one count
Convictions2x wilful murder

The Claremont serial killings is the name given by the media to a case involving the disappearance of an Australian woman, aged 18, and the killings of two others, aged 23 and 27, in 1996–1997. After attending night spots in Claremont, a wealthy western suburb of Perth, Western Australia, all three women disappeared in similar circumstances leading police to suspect that an unidentified serial killer was the offender. The case was described as the state's biggest, longest running, and most expensive investigation.[1][2]

In 2016, a suspect, Bradley Robert Edwards, was arrested. He was held on remand and his trial began in November 2019[3][4] and ended on 25 June 2020, after seven months of hearings and evidence from more than 200 witnesses.[5] On 24 September 2020, he was found guilty of the murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon, and not guilty of the murder of Sarah Spiers, whose remains have yet to be located.[6][7] On 23 December 2020, he was sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole after 40 years.[8]

Background[edit]

Bayview Terrace in Claremont

The case began with the disappearance of Sarah Spiers (18) on 27 January 1996, after she left Club Bayview in the centre of Claremont at around 2:00 am.[9] At 2:06 am, Spiers called Swan Taxis from a public telephone booth.[1] Although she was living in South Perth with her older sister at the time, she had requested to be taken to the nearby suburb of Mosman Park.[1] She was then sighted waiting alone near the corner of Stirling Road and Stirling Highway by three eyewitnesses, who also mentioned seeing an unidentified car stopping where she was waiting.[1] However, she was not at the site when the responding taxi arrived at 2:09 am and, in the dark,[2] could have been missed by the driver. Her disappearance soon attracted massive publicity[10][11] and her fate remains unknown.[12][13]

In the early hours of Sunday 9 June 1996, Jane Rimmer (23) from Shenton Park, also disappeared from the same part of Claremont.[14] Similar to Spiers, she had been out socialising with friends the night before. Rimmer's friends explained how they had moved from the Ocean Beach Hotel to the Continental Hotel and then Club Bayview.[1] Noting the long line at the club, her friends then caught a taxi home, but Rimmer opted to stay, and she was last seen on security footage waiting outside the Continental at 12:04 am.[1] Fifty-five days later, on Saturday, 3 August 1996, her naked body was found 40 km (25 mi) south in bush-land near Woolcoot Road, Wellard by a family picking wildflowers.[15][16]

Nine months later, in the early hours of Saturday 15 March 1997, Ciara Glennon, a 27-year-old lawyer from Mosman Park, also disappeared from the Claremont area.[17][18] Like the others, she was with friends at the Continental and had decided to make her own way home. Three men at a bus stop saw Glennon walking south along Stirling Highway at approximately 12:30 am, and observed her interacting with an unidentified light coloured vehicle which had stopped by her.[1] Nineteen days later, on 3 April, her semi-clothed body was found by a bush walker, 40 km (25 mi) north, near a track in scrub off Pipidinny Road in Eglinton.[19]

Investigation[edit]

Within 48 hours of the disappearance of Spiers, the case was taken over by the Major Crimes Squad.[1] After the disappearance of Rimmer, the Western Australia Police set up a special task-force called Macro to investigate the two similar cases.[20][21] After the disappearance of Glennon, police confirmed that they were searching for a serial killer, and the Western Australian Government offered a $250,000 reward, the largest ever offered in the state at that time.[1]

Initial suspicion centred on the unidentified vehicles seen at two of the locations, and on an unidentified man seen in the video footage.[1] Suspicion then focused on Perth's taxi drivers, because the women were last seen in circumstances where they may have used taxis. This included a driver who claimed to have transported Spiers the night before her disappearance.[22] A massive fingerprint and DNA-testing exercise was then carried out on the thousands of taxi drivers licensed in Western Australia.[23][24] Given evidence of a number of unlicensed operators, examining standards for eligibility were raised, and 78 drivers with significant criminal history were de-licensed.[2][25] Stricter standards were also applied to verifying that decommissioned taxis were stripped of insignia and equipment.[1] In December 2015, investigators finally revealed that fibres taken from Rimmer were identified as coming from a VS Series 1 Holden Commodore.[2]

Macro attracted both praise and criticism for its handling of the case.[2] At its peak, it had over 100 members across 10 teams. To avoid leaks, strict confidentiality protocols were implemented, and details of the nature of the deaths and injuries were suppressed.[1] One of the tactics used by Macro was the controversial distribution of questionnaires to 110 "persons of interest", including various confrontational enquiries such as "Are you the killer?"[2] Another was its reliance on international experts and use of an imported lie detector machine.[2] Further, one of its officers accepted an offer by David Birnie to assist the investigation.[2][26] Criticism was also laid on its overly narrow focus on the initial prime suspect despite the lack of direct evidence (as occurred in the cases of Andrew Mallard and Lloyd Rayney).[27] Over its lifetime, Macro had 11 police reviews, including one in August 2004 led by Paul Schramm, the officer who had led the Snowtown investigation.[2] It was finally wound down in September 2005 and the investigation moved to the Special Crimes Squad.[2]

Suspects[edit]

Bradley Robert Edwards

Born (1968-12-07) 7 December 1968 (age 52)[28]

Merredin, Western Australia[29][30]

Criminal statusImprisoned
Conviction(s)2x wilful murder (24 September 2020)
Criminal penaltyLife imprisonment with a non-parole period of 40 years
Victims2 known; 1 suspected

Span of crimes

January 1996–14 March 1997
CountryAustralia
State(s)Western Australia

In April 1998, a public servant from Cottesloe, Lance Williams (41), was identified by police as the prime suspect, after his behaviour attracted their attention (e.g. driving around after midnight and circling the Claremont area up to 30 times)[31] during a decoy operation.[32][27] Subjected to a high level of surveillance and police pressure over several years, he continued to maintain his innocence. After interviewing him six times at length, police declared in late 2008 that he was "no longer a person of interest".[33] He died in 2018.[31]

It was reported that police also investigated whether Bradley Murdoch may have been involved,[34] although Murdoch was serving a custodial sentence from November 1995 until February 1997. In October 2006, it was also announced that Mark Dixie was a prime suspect in the killings, and that Macro had requested DNA samples.[35] However, WA Police Deputy Commissioner Murray Lampard was later quoted as saying: "Dixie was closely investigated at the time and eventually ruled out as a suspect."[36][37][38]

On 22 December 2016, Bradley Robert Edwards (b. 1968) was arrested at his Kewdale house in relation to the deaths of both Rimmer and Glennon.[39] The next day, he was charged with both murders.[40] According to ABC News, he is believed to have had no previous link to the case, though he had pleaded guilty to the aggravated assault of a social worker at Hollywood Hospital on 7 May 1990.[41] He was also charged in relation to two other attacks: the house break and enter and unlawful detention of an 18-year-old woman in Huntingdale on 15 February 1988 (where a stolen kimono with his DNA was dropped as the attacker fled), and the unlawful detention and two counts of aggravated sexual penetration without consent of a 17-year-old girl in Claremont on 12 February 1995.[note 1][40][42][43] On 22 February 2018, Edwards was also charged with the wilful murder of the third victim, Spiers.[44][45][46] In all, Edwards was charged with eight offences,[47][48] and on 21 October 2019, Edwards pleaded guilty to the five non-murder charges (at Huntingdale and Karrakatta Cemetery).[49]

Trial[edit]

Before the trial, the prosecution applied for Edwards to be tried by judge alone without a jury. The application was granted due to the publicity surrounding the case and the graphic nature of the evidence.[50] The murder trial began on 25 November 2019, before Supreme Court Justice Stephen Hall.[51][52][53] During the trial, the court was told that two of the victims had defensive wounds.[54] Edwards' DNA was also found under Glennon's fingernails (and matched to the kimono) although the defence argued this evidence was contaminated in the laboratory.[5]

One of the main pieces of evidence was the Telstra work vehicles. Edwards was working as a technician at the time, and it was claimed that he used company vehicles after hours to execute the crimes. This was corroborated by a witness, a security guard, who recalled seeing a Telecom van parked on multiple occasions at the Karrakatta Cemetery "for no apparent reason", both after the 1995 attack and before Spiers' 1996 disappearance.[3] According to the prosecutor, Carmel Barbagallo, the state presented this evidence as part of a case called "Telstra Living Witness project" where, between 1995 and 1997, a man with a Telstra station wagon stopped to look at women and offer them rides.[3]

1995-1996 Holden VS Commodore Executive station wagon 03

During the trial, a witness from the group of men dubbed "Burger Boys", identified a Series 1 VS Commodore station wagon as cruising past them shortly after Glennon walked past. The vehicle had distinctive tear-drop hubcaps which were present on some Series 1 VS commodores[55] Between April 1996 and December 1998, Edwards drove a white VS Series wagon with Telstra logos.[56] The vehicle was tracked down and impounded on the same day as his arrest. During the hearing, it was revealed that fibres matching carpet in the rear of Edwards' vehicle matched fibres found on the bodies of both Rimmer and Glennon[5] although defence argued these fibres could have come from another source or another vehicle which was not included in the WA crime database.[5]

The trial concluded on 25 June 2020, after seven months of hearings and evidence from more than 200 witnesses.[5] Justice Hall then retired to consider his verdict in the case, flagging that it may potentially be handed down before Edwards's remand in custody ends on 24 September 2020.[5] On the final day of custody, Hall handed down a 619-page written verdict within which Edwards was found guilty of the murders of Rimmer and Glennon, but not of Spiers (though it was "more likely" that Edwards was involved in her disappearance than not).[57] On 23 December 2020, Edwards was sentenced to life imprisonment with a non-parole period of 40 years. Hall said there was a "high likelihood" that he will die in prison.[8]

Possible related cases[edit]

It has been suggested by journalist Liam Bartlett that Spiers was not the first victim.[32] He wrote that police have told the father of a fourth missing woman, 22-year-old Julie Cutler, that his daughter was probably a victim of the Claremont killer. Cutler, a university student from Fremantle, vanished after leaving a staff function at the Parmelia Hilton Hotel in Perth at 9:00 pm on 20 June 1988.[2] Her car was found in the surf near the groyne at Cottesloe Beach two days later, and her fate remains unknown.[32]

Other possible cases include that of Lisa Brown (19), a sex worker who disappeared on 10 November 1998, and Sara McMahon (20), who disappeared on 8 November 2000.[2]

See also[edit]

Media[edit]

  • Australian Story, ABC, November 2007.
  • Hunt for a Killer: The Claremont Murders, Crime Investigation Australia, 2008.
  • The Claremont Serial Killer, Casefile True Crime Podcast, 20 August 2016.[2]
  • Claremont Serial Killings podcast, Post Newspapers, 2019.[58]
  • Claremont: The Trial podcast, The West Australian, 2019–2020.[27][59]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^The victim was taken in Rowe Park, shortly after exiting Club Bay View. She was tied, raped, stripped, and abandoned in Karrakatta Cemetery. In 2009, DNA evidence linked these cases to the Glennon one.

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefghijklReel Truth Crime - True Crime (16 December 2018), The Claremont Murders | Crime Investigation Australia | Murders Documentary | True Crime, retrieved 11 June 2019
  2. ^ abcdefghijklm"Casefile: True Crime Podcast – Case 30: The Claremont Serial Killer". Casefile: True Crime Podcast. 20 August 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  3. ^ abcMenagh, Joanna (25 June 2019). "Accused 'malevolent' killer stalked Claremont to abduct women, court told". ABC News. Retrieved 10 July 2019.
  4. ^Andrea Mayes (27 November 2019). "Bradley Edwards's first wife reveals fight the night before hospital worker attack". ABC News. Retrieved 5 December 2019.
  5. ^ abcdef"It was a crime that shocked Perth more than two decades ago, now the hunt for a serial killer may be almost over". www.abc.net.au. 25 June 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2020.
  6. ^McNeill, Heather (24 September 2020). "Claremont serial killer verdict LIVE updates: Bradley Edwards found guilty of 1990's murders of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon; not guilty of Sarah Spiers murder". WAtoday. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  7. ^Andrea Mayes (24 September 2020). "Claremont killer Bradley Edwards found guilty of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon murders but not Sarah Spiers". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  8. ^ abAndrea Mayes (23 December 2020). "Claremont killer Bradley Edwards gets life sentence for murder of Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  9. ^"Claremont serial killings: Sarah Spiers murder charge for Bradley Robert Edwards". ABC News. 23 February 2018. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  10. ^Taylor, Grant; Knowles, Gabrielle (22 December 2016). "The night Sarah Spiers disappeared from a Claremont street corner". The West Australian. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  11. ^Stewart, Anthony (27 January 2016). "Unsolved serial killings still haunt West Australia". PM. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  12. ^Flint, John (4 January 2015). "Claremont serial killer: Taxi clue to Ciara Glennon's death". The Sunday Times. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  13. ^Thomson, Chris; Hayward, Andrea (28 August 2008). "New footage of Perth serial killer's victim released". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  14. ^Buckley-Carr, Alana (29 August 2008). "CCTV footage could solve Claremont killings". The Australian. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  15. ^Beattie, Adrian (30 April 2016). "WA police deny 'inaccurate' reports about Claremont serial killer 'mistake'". WAtoday. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  16. ^Claremont serial killer video releasedArchived 12 July 2009 at the Wayback Machine. The West Australian. 28 August 2008.
  17. ^Taylor, Grant (22 December 2016). "Nightmare begins for third family". The West Australian. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  18. ^Wainwright, Robert (25 September 2004). "Closing in on a killer". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  19. ^Australian Broadcasting CorporationArchived 25 December 2016 at the Wayback Machine, Australian Story, He Who Waits, 9 February 2004
  20. ^"Police deny talk of Claremont arrest". The Sydney Morning Herald. Australian Associated Press. 22 January 2014. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  21. ^Pennells, Steve (31 May 2015). "Why we didn't catch the Claremont killer". Yahoo! News. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  22. ^"Police raid lawyer in hunt for serial killer". The Age. Australian Associated Press. 17 September 2004. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  23. ^"The Courage of our Convictions – The Claremont Serial Killer". Radio National. 25 June 2000. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  24. ^Kidman, John (1 October 2006). "Murder accused linked to WA riddle". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  25. ^Moulton, Emily (27 May 2015). "Almost 20 years on police have yet to catch the Claremont serial killer". Herald Sun. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  26. ^"Claremont detective turned to serial killer to help him with case". NewsComAu. 31 May 2015. Retrieved 12 June 2019.
  27. ^ abc"Claremont Serial Killings Podcast". PerthNow. 27 February 2019. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  28. ^"Claremont killings: how Bradley Robert Edwards was charged with murder of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon". The Australian.
  29. ^McNeill, Heather (5 May 2020). "Claremont killer trial LIVE: 'I'm not involved in any of that, I'm innocent': Mr Edwards denies murders". WAtoday.
  30. ^"Claremont serial killer jailed for life in WA". news.com.au. 22 December 2020.
  31. ^ abAllan-Petale, David (6 February 2018). "Former Claremont serial killer suspect Lance Williams dies". WAtoday. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  32. ^ abcChristian, Bret (1 February 2003). "'Police decoy used in killer hunt sting'". Post Newspapers. Archived from the original on 8 April 2006. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  33. ^"Claremont serial killings suspect cleared". WAtoday. 26 November 2008. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  34. ^"Murdoch's movements probed". The Sydney Morning Herald. Australian Associated Press. 17 December 2005. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  35. ^"Breaking Australian and World News Headlines - 9News". Retrieved 24 December 2016.
  36. ^Russell, Mark (24 February 2008). "Did this man kill his first victims in Australia?". The Sunday Age. p. 6. Retrieved 24 October 2014.
  37. ^Perpitch, Nicolas (24 February 2008). "WA police defend role in Dixie probe". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 24 October 2014.
  38. ^"Murder accused linked to WA riddle - National - smh.com.au". Retrieved 24 December 2016.
  39. ^"Claremont serial killings: Man arrested over women's murders still in custody 24 hours later [22 December 2016]". ABC News. Retrieved 23 December 2016.
  40. ^ ab"Man questioned by cold case detectives over Claremont serial killings 23 December 2016". Perth Now Sunday Times. Retrieved 23 December 2016.
  41. ^"Woman attacked by Bradley Edwards in 1990 reflects on seeing Claremont killer in court". www.abc.net.au. 27 September 2020. Retrieved 24 December 2020.
  42. ^"Casefile: True Crime Podcast – Case 30: The Claremont Serial Killer (update)". Casefile: True Crime Podcast. 20 August 2016. Retrieved 13 June 2019.
  43. ^"Experts to help prove Claremont DNA not contaminated". The West Australian. 20 March 2019. Retrieved 13 June 2019.
  44. ^"Claremont serial killings: Sarah Spiers murder charge for Bradley Robert Edwards". ABC News. 22 February 2018. Retrieved 22 February 2018.
  45. ^"The eight charges faced by Bradley Robert Edwards". The West Australian. 14 February 2019. Retrieved 21 December 2019.
  46. ^Barry, Heather McNeill, Hannah (17 December 2019). "Claremont killer trial LIVE: Mother becomes tearful recounting finding Jane Rimmer's body while picking lilies". WAtoday. Retrieved 21 December 2019.
  47. ^THE STATE OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA -v- EDWARDS, 20 March 2019, retrieved 18 January 2020
  48. ^* Count 1 On 15 February 1988, at Huntingdale, the accused broke and entered the dwellinghouse of EWH with intent to commit an offence therein and the offence was committed at night.
    • Count 2 On the same date and at the same place as count 1, the accused unlawfully deprived ALH of her personal liberty.
    • Count 3 On 12 February 1995, at Claremont and elsewhere, the accused unlawfully detained KJG.
    • Count 4 On the same date as in count 3, at Karrakatta, the accused sexually penetrated KJG without her consent, by penetrating her vagina with his penis, and did bodily harm to KJG, and did an act which was likely to seriously and substantially degrade or humiliate KJG.
    • Count 5 On the same date and at the same place as count 4, the accused sexually penetrated KJG without her consent, by penetrating her anus with his penis, and did bodily harm to KJG, and did an act which was likely to seriously and substantially degrade or humiliate KJG.
    • Count 6 On or about 27 January 1996, at Claremont and elsewhere, the accused wilfully murdered Sarah Jane Spiers.
    • Count 7 On or about 9 June 1996, at Claremont and elsewhere, the accused wilfully murdered Jane Louise Rimmer.
    • Count 8 On or about 15 March 1997, at Claremont and elsewhere, the accused wilfully murdered Ciara Eilish Glennon.
  49. ^Mayes, rea; Hamlyn, Charlotte (21 October 2019). "Claremont trial rocked as accused killer admits to rape, attacks on two women". ABC News. Retrieved 21 December 2019.
  50. ^Hamlyn, Charlotte (30 April 2019). "Judge warns Claremont serial killer trial video, photos are 'particularly graphic'". ABC News.
  51. ^Hamlyn, Charlotte (24 April 2019). "Claremont serial killer trial of Bradley Edwards may be delayed as new evidence emerges". ABC News.
  52. ^"WA's 'trial of the century' to begin in November". The West Australian. 6 June 2019. Retrieved 10 July 2019.
  53. ^"Claremont accused admits rape". www.theaustralian.com.au. 21 October 2019. Retrieved 5 December 2019.
  54. ^"Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon died while trying to defend themselves, Claremont trial hears". ABC News. 29 January 2020.
  55. ^Barry, Heather McNeill, Hannah (17 December 2019). "Claremont killer trial LIVE: Mother becomes tearful recounting finding Jane Rimmer's body while picking lilies". WAtoday. Retrieved 24 December 2019.
  56. ^"Accused Claremont serial killer's car and uniform had fibres matching those found on bodies, court told". ABC News. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  57. ^The State of Western Australia v Edwards [No 7] [2020] WASC 339
  58. ^"Claremont Serial Killings on Apple Podcasts". Apple Podcasts (in Japanese). Retrieved 26 September 2020.
  59. ^"CLAREMONT: The Trial on Apple Podcasts". Apple Podcasts. Retrieved 25 December 2020.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claremont_serial_killings

You will also like:

Claremont murderer Bradley Robert Edwards sentenced to at least 40 years behind bars

Claremont killer Bradley Robert Edwards will likely die behind bars after a West Australian judge sentenced him to life in prison with a non-parole period of 40 years.

Edwards, who terrorised Perth’s suburbs for almost a decade, showed no emotion in the supreme court on Wednesday after receiving his sentence, which was greeted with applause from the public gallery which included family members of his victims.

The 52-year-old was convicted in September of abducting and killing childcare worker Jane Rimmer, 23, and solicitor Ciara Glennon, 27, in 1996 and 1997. He was acquitted of the 1996 murder of 18-year-old secretary Sarah Spiers.

All three women disappeared after a night out with friends in the affluent suburb of Claremont, with the bodies of Rimmer and Glennon discovered in bushland weeks after they were killed.

Spiers’s body has never been found but justice Stephen Hall said the confessed rapist’s propensity for violent abductions made it likely that he also killed her.

Edwards pleaded guilty on the eve of his trial to sexually assaulting two young women in 1988 and 1995.

Prosecutor Carmel Barbagallo on Wednesday argued Edwards should never be released from prison. She said his “perverse” and sustained offending had undermined the community’s sense of safety for themselves and their loved ones.

“This case is so serious, so rare, so exceptional, that the maximum available sentence is appropriate,” Barbagallo told the court.

The judge described Edwards as a dangerous predator who had sought out vulnerable young women and attacked them for his own gratification. But Hall declined to impose a non-parole order, saying a life sentence with a long minimum term was appropriate under the circumstances.

Defence lawyer Paul Yovich had argued against the non-parole order, saying the features of the killings were not unique for such cases.

Edwards would have been just the second person in WA to be denied the possibility of parole. Hall imposed such a term earlier this year on family murderer Anthony Robert Harvey.

The court heard Edwards, who opted not to give evidence during his seven-month trial, had declined to participate in a psychiatric report.

Edwards committed his first known attack on women in 1988, breaking into the Huntingdale home of an 18-year-old acquaintance and indecently assaulting her as she slept. That attack provided the crucial piece of evidence homicide detectives needed to arrest him almost 29 years later.

He’d left behind a semen-stained silk kimono stolen from a washing line, and when it was finally tested in November 2016, DNA matched swabs taken from a teenager he abducted from Claremont, then raped at nearby Karrakatta cemetery in 1995.

It also matched cellular material found under Glennon’s fingernails, gathered during a violent struggle shortly before her death. Fibre evidence established that both murder victims had been in Edwards’s Telstra work vehicle shortly before their deaths.

The brave victims of the Karrakatta and Huntingdale attacks each faced Edwards to deliver eloquent victim impact statements.

“He preyed on weak, vulnerable young women who didn’t stand a chance,” the Karrakatta victim said. “How pathetic.”

She refused to let the attack define her. “Something can break you but you can still survive it and you can thrive, as I have,” she said.

The Huntingdale victim said her trauma had only intensified after Edwards’s arrest. “Bradley Edwards now features as the villain of my nightmares and I can’t make it stop,” she said.

Barbagallo read a brief victim impact statement from Jennifer Rimmer, who said she missed her daughter every day and wished she could have become a mother herself.

The family of Glennon opted not to provide a victim impact statement but Barbagallo described their suffering as “beyond words”.

Sours: https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/dec/23/claremont-murderer-bradley-robert-edwards-sentenced-to-at-least-40-years-behind-bars


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