Windows update frozen

Windows update frozen DEFAULT

For the most part, Windows Update works silently in the background. It downloads updates automatically, installs the ones it can, and saves others to install when you restart Windows. But sometimes it breaks and stops working. Here’s how to fix Windows Update when it gets stuck or frozen.

  1. Try running the Windows Update Troubleshooter, which you can search for in the Start menu.
  2. If that doesn’t help, you can try deleting Windows Update’s cache by booting into Safe Mode, stopping the wuauserv service, and deleting the files in C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution.
  3. If all else fails, download updates manually using the WSUS Offline Update tool.

This can happen on Windows 7, 8, or 10, but it’s become especially common with Windows 7. Sometimes updates will error out, or sometimes Windows Update may just get stuck “searching for updates” forever. Here’s how to fix Windows Update

Remember: Windows updates are important. No matter what troubles you’re having, we recommend keeping automatic updates turned on—it’s one of the best ways to keep yourself safe from ransomware and other threats. If you turn automatic updates off, you are leaving yourself vulnerable to new attacks.

Fix Windows Update with a Troubleshooter

Windows includes a built-in troubleshooter that may be able to help fix a stuck update. It’s the easiest method to try, so go ahead and run it first. The troubleshooter performs three actions:

  1. It shuts down Windows Update Services.
  2. It renames the folder to , essentially clearing the Windows Update download cache so that it can start over.
  3. It restarts the Windows Update Services.

This troubleshooter is available on Windows 7, 8, and 10. You’ll find it in the same place on all modern versions of Windows.

To run the troubleshooter, hit Start, search for “troubleshooting,” and then run the selection that search comes up with.

In the Control Panel list of troubleshooters, in the “System and Security” section, click “Fix problems with Windows Update.”

In the Windows Update troubleshooting window, click “Advanced.”

In the advanced settings, make sure that the “Apply repairs automatically” check box is enabled, click “Run as administrator” and then click Next. Giving the tool administrative privileges helps ensure that it can delete files in the download cache.

The troubleshooter works through its process and then lets you know whether it could identify and fix the problem. Most of the time, the troubleshooter can successfully remove a stuck update from the queue. Go ahead and try running Windows Update again. Even if the troubleshooter says it couldn’t identify the problem, it’s possible that the actions of starting and stopping the service and clearing out the cache did the trick.

Fix Windows Update by Deleting Its Cache Manually

If you’re still having trouble after running the troubleshooter (or if you’re the type that just likes to do things yourself), performing the same actions manually may help where the troubleshooter didn’t. We’re also going to add the extra step of booting into Safe Mode first, just to make sure that Windows can really let go of that cache of Windows Update downloads.

RELATED:How to Boot Into Safe Mode on Windows 10 or 8 (The Easy Way)

Start off by booting Windows into Safe Mode. On Windows 7, restart your computer and press the “F8” key on your computer while it boots to access the boot options menu, where you’ll find a “Safe Mode” option. On Windows 8 and 10, hold down the Shift key as you click the “Restart” option in Windows and navigate to Troubleshoot > Advanced Options > Windows Startup Settings > Restart > Safe Mode.

It’s a little more cumbersome than it used to be on the latest versions of Windows, but it’s still reasonably straightforward. Of course, if you want, you could also take some time to add Safe Mode to the Windows boot menu to make it easier in the future.

When you’ve booted into Safe Mode, the next step is to stop the Windows Update service, and the easiest way to do that is with the Command Prompt. To launch the Command Prompt in Windows 7, open the Start menu, search for “Command Prompt”, and launch the Command Prompt shortcut. You’ll also find it under Start > All Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt. In Windows 8 or 10, you can right-click the Start menu (or press Windows+X), choose “Command Prompt (Admin)” and then click Yes to allow it to run with administrative privileges.

At the Command Prompt, type the following command and then hit Enter to stop the Windows Update service. Go ahead and leave the Command Prompt window open.

net stop wuauserv

Next, open a File Explorer window and navigate to . Delete all the files in the folder. Don’t worry. There’s nothing vital here. Windows Update will recreate what it needs the next time you run it.

Now, you’ll restart the Windows Update service. Return to the Command Prompt window, type the following, and hit Enter:

net start wuauserv

When the service has restarted, you can close Command Prompt and restart Windows into normal mode. Give Windows Update another try and see if your problem has been fixed.

Windows 7: Update the Windows Update Service

RELATED:Where to Download Windows 10, 8.1, and 7 ISOs Legally

If you’re installing Windows 7 from scratch, you’ll notice that Windows Update will take a very long time while checking for updates. This can also occur if you haven’t checked for updates in a while, even if you installed your Windows 7 system long ago. This occurs even if you install Windows 7 from a disc or USB drive with Service Pack 1 integrated, which you should. Microsoft’s official Windows 7 installation media downloads includes SP1.

Microsoft has now provided official instructions about how to fix this problem. According to Microsoft, this problem occurs because Windows Update itself needs an update, creating a bit of a catch-22. If the latest updates to Windows Update are installed, the process should work better.

Here are Microsoft’s official instructions for fixing the problem.

First, open Windows Update. Head to Control Panel > System and Security > Windows Update. Click the “Change Settings” link in the sidebar. Select “Never Check For Updates (Not Recommended)” in the dropdown box and then click “OK”.

Reboot your computer after you change this setting.

RELATED:How Do I Know if I’m Running 32-bit or 64-bit Windows?

After the computer restarts, you’ll need to manually download and install two updates for Windows 7. You’ll need to check whether you’re running a 32-bit version of Windows or a 64-bit version and download the appropriate updates for your PC.

For 64-bit editions of Windows 7, download these updates:

For 32-bit editions of Windows 7:, download these updates:

Double-click the “KB3020369” update to install it first.

After the first update finishes installing, double-click the “KB3172605” update to install it second. You’ll be asked to restart the computer as part of the installation process. After it restarts, Microsoft says you should wait ten to twelve minutes to allow the process to finish.

When you’re done–remember to wait ten to twelve minutes after restarting–head back to the Windows Update dialog at Control Panel > System and Security > Windows Update. Click “Change Settings” and set it back to Automatic (or choose your desired setting).

Click “Check for Updates” to have Windows check for and install updates. According to Microsoft, this should have fixed your problems and Windows Update should now work normally without any long delays.

Windows 7: Get the Convenience Rollup

RELATED:How to Update Windows 7 All at Once with Microsoft's Convenience Rollup

Microsoft has also produced a “convenience rollup” for Windows 7. This is essentially Windows 7 Service Pack 2 in all but name. It bundles together a large number of updates that would take a very long time to install normally. This package includes updates released from February 2011 all the way to May 16, 2016.

To speed up the updating of a new Windows 7 system, download the convenience rollup and install it rather than waiting for Windows Update. Unfortunately, Microsoft doesn’t offer the update rollup through Windows Update–you have to go out of your way to get it. But it’s easy enough to install if you know it exists and know you have to go looking for it after you install Windows 7.

There will be much fewer updates to install via Windows Update after you install this, so the process should be much faster. Check out our instructions on installing the Conveniene Rollup here.

Windows 7, 8, or 10: Download Updates Manually WSUS Offline Update

If none of the official solutions fixed your problem, we have another solution that’s worked for us in the past. It’s a third-party tool called WSUS Offline Update.

This tool will download available Windows Update packages from Microsoft and install them. Run it once, have it download those updates and install them, and Windows Update should work normally afterwards. This has worked for us in the past when none of the other solutions did.

Download WSUS Offline Update, extract it to a folder, and run the UpdateGenerator.exe application.

Select the version of Windows you’re using–“x64 Global” if you’re using a 64-bit edition or “x86 Global” if you’re using a 32-bit edition. After you do, click “Start” and WSUS Offline Update will download updates.

Wait for the updates download. If it’s a fresh install of Windows 7, there will be a lot of updates, so this may take quite a while. It depends on the speed of your Internet connection and how fast Microsoft’s download servers are for you.

After the updates are done downloading, open the “client” folder in the WSUS Offline folder and run the UpdateInstaller.exe application.

Click “Start” to install the downloaded updates. After the tool finishes installing the updates, Windows Update should work normally again.

This should hopefully become a bit easier in the future. In October 2016, Microsoft announced that it was making changes to the way Windows 7 and 8.1 are “serviced”, or updated. Microsoft plans to release fewer small updates and more bundles of large updates. It will also begin combining previous updates into a monthly update rollup. This will mean fewer individual updates to install, and updating newly installed Windows 7 systems should become faster over time.

Sours: https://www.howtogeek.com/247380/how-to-fix-windows-update-when-it-gets-stuck/

Windows Update Stuck or Frozen? Check the Fix Out!

If you also find that you Windows Update stuck at a certain number, 0% or any other figure, when downloading updates and freezes there, this post will help you solve the problem quickly and easily by yourself. Before you make any moves, make sure that your Windows Update is actually stucksince some of the update patches could take minutes or hours or more to configure or install. If nothing happens on your PC screen for more than 3 hours or more, and you cannot see the hard drive activity light, then your update is stuck. There are many unclear reasons why this problem is happening, therefore, there are different solutions to tackle this issue. We will be introducing one of the most useful methods: restart your Windows Update services. The detailed instructions are as follows.  1) On  your keyboard, press Windows logo keyand Xat the same time, then choose Command Prompt (Admin)from the list of choice.  Click Yesat the prompted administrative permission.  2) Type in net stop wuauservand hit Enter. Wait for the process to finish. Then type in net stop bitsand hit Enter. Wait for the process to finish.  3) Navigate to C:\Windows\SoftwareDistrubution folder. Delete all the files and folders inside by pressing Ctrl + Aand hit Deletekey. 

If some of the files refuse to be deleted, you need to restart your computer. After restart, repeat step 1) and 2), then delete the files again.  4) After emptying the SoftwareDistributionfolder, restart your computer.  5) On your keyboard, press Windows keyand Xat the same time, then choose Command Prompt (Admin)from the list of choice.  Hit Yesat the prompted administrative permission.  6) Enter net start wuauservand hit Enter. Wait for the process to finish. Then enter net start bitsand hit Enter. Wait for the process to finish.  7) Launch your Windows Updateagain to see if the update goes all well now. When the update completes, it is suggested that you restart your PC to complete the process. 

PRO TIP

When the update finishes, you may need to update all available device drivers in your PC.  If you don’t have the time, patience or computer skills to update all drivers manually, you can do it automatically with Driver Easy.Driver Easywill automatically recognize your system and find the correct drivers for it. You don’t need to know exactly what system your computer is running, you don’t need to risk downloading and installing the wrong driver, and you don’t need to worry about making a mistake when installing.  You can update your drivers automatically with either the FREE or the Pro version of Driver Easy. But with the Pro version it takes just 2 clicks: 1) Download and install Driver Easy.2) Run Driver Easy and click Scan Now button. Driver Easy will then scan your computer and detect any problem drivers. 

3) Click the Update button next to the driver you need to automatically download and install the correct version of this driver (you can do this with the FREE version). Or click Update All to automatically download and install the correct version of all the drivers that are missing or out of date on your system (this requires the Pro version – you’ll be prompted to upgrade when you click Update All).

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How to fix a stuck Windows 10 update

Step 2. Restart your PC. Resetting your PC mid-installation is a cardinal sin and expressly warned against by manufacturers, but if your update is genuinely stuck then you haven't got a lot of options. Use your computer's physical power or reset button, and remember that you may have to hold it down.

Step 3. Boot into Safe Mode. Accessible from the Startup Settings menu, this mode disables everything but the absolute essentials Windows needs to run, ensuring that any software conflicts that could be interfering with the update are removed. After the update installs, you can restart Windows to exit Safe Mode.

The Windows 10 safe mode user interface

Step 4. Perform a System Restore. In order to safeguard against this type of thing, Windows will usually create a restore point just before applying an update, so you can roll it back if there are any problems. You can access the System Restore function from Safe Mode, or from the Advanced Startup Options if that doesn't work.

Step 5. Try a Startup Repair. A more in-depth fix than just doing a System Restore, the Startup Repair tool (also accessible from the Advanced Startup Options screen) can sometimes fix underlying issues that may be hampering the update process.

Step 6. Perform a clean Windows installation. This is pretty much the 'nuclear option', but if all else fails, you may be forced to simply erase your previous copy of Windows and simply start from scratch. Be warned, though, that this will erase your entire hard drive, so make sure that any vital data is as thoroughly backed up as possible beforehand.

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Sours: https://www.itpro.co.uk/operating-systems/27717/how-to-fix-a-stuck-windows-10-update
What If You Turn Off Your PC During An Update?

How to fix a stuck Windows update

Found a Windows 10 update is stuck? Thankfully, a stuck Windows 10 update isn’t the worst thing in the world. In fact, it’s not entirely unavoidable. With so many hardware and software configurations out there, there's always the chance that some unexpected problem will crop up.

Operating system updates can be a real chore, and you might not care for them. But like taxes and car MOTs, they are a necessary evil, essential for a happy and peaceful computing life. They keep you protected by squashing nasty bugs, and your OS running as smoothly as possible.

Still, installing a new update won’t always run smoothly. Even with Microsoft trying to make the process as pain-free as possible in recent versions of Windows, getting a Windows 10 update stuck may still happen to you. When it does, you’ll be happy to know that there’s almost always a fix.

So don’t panic and read on. We've got you covered. Here are a few fixes when you end up with a Windows 10 update that’s stuck.

How to fix a stuck Windows update

  1. Make sure the updates really are stuck
  2. Turn it off and on again
  3. Check the Windows Update utility
  4. Run Microsoft's troubleshooter program
  5. Launch Windows in Safe Mode
  6. Go back in time with System Restore
  7. Delete the Windows Update file cache yourself
  8. Launch a thorough virus scan 
  9. Run a full Windows reset

1. Make sure the updates really are stuck

We're going to cover a lot of ground here for several versions of Windows and a variety of 'stuck' scenarios, so you may have to tweak some of these steps to suit your situation and software.

The first point to make is that interfering with updates that aren't actually stuck can cause a host of problems, so you want to make sure they really are stuck.

If you've got the time, and the patience, we'd recommend waiting a couple of hours, especially with slower machines – go and cut the grass or watch a movie. It may seem extreme, but you don't want to start meddling with these fundamental processes unless you really have to.

2. Turn it off and on again

Do you know why "have you tried turning it off and on again" is such an IT support cliché? Because it so often works. There's no magic trick to this – it simply clears out your computer's temporary memory (including any stalled files or processes), and lets Windows start again from scratch with everything on the system.

If your updates are stuck in the background while you still have access to Windows, you can restart as normal; if they're stuck before or after the OS loads, you're going to have to hold down the power button and do a hard reset. This can cause issues itself, so make sure your updates definitely aren't progressing at all.

3. Check the Windows Update utility

In Windows 10 you can find the Windows Update page by launching the Settings app from the Start menu and clicking Update & Security – if there's something wrong and Windows knows what it is then you should find details here. Sometimes you'll just get a message telling you to try the update again at a different time.

If you click 'Advanced options' and then 'View your update history', you can see recently installed updates that were successful, and uninstall some or all of them – again, this can be a handy troubleshooting option. Windows 10 has actually streamlined the update process, so you should be seeing fewer errors.

4. Run Microsoft's troubleshooter program

Microsoft feels your pain: it knows the update process can cause problems every now and again, which is why it's developed a troubleshooter program specifically for it – search the old Control Panel for "troubleshooting", then select 'Fix problems with Windows Update' from the list on-screen.

The link should be available in Windows 7 and 8 too, but if not you can get at it on the web as well. That said, if you haven't yet upgraded to Microsoft's latest and greatest operating system then it's probably still worth your while, as it's more than likely to solve your update problems at the same time.

5. Launch Windows in Safe Mode

Safe Mode is like a restart with extras – only the very basic apps and code that Windows needs to run are loaded into memory, so there's even less chance of a rogue, damaged file interfering with the update. In Windows 10, hold down the Shift key then choose Power and Restart from the Windows sign-in screen.

On the next screen you see pick Troubleshoot, Advanced Options, Startup Settings and Restart, and you should then see the Safe Mode option appear: try running through the update process again if you can. A quick search online will give you Safe Mode instructions for older versions of Windows.

6. Go back in time with System Restore

System Restore has been helpful for solving Windows problems for many a year now, but it happens to be quite well hidden in Windows 10. Go to Control Panel, System, System Protection and then click System Restore. Go through the wizard, then choose 'Show more restore points' to see all your available options.

Pick a time and date, then complete the wizard to go back to how Windows was configured at that point (and hopefully solve your update issues at the same time). The process doesn't affect your personal files or programs, but it may not be available to you depending on how Windows was originally set up.

7. Delete the Windows Update file cache yourself, part 1

If Windows' own troubleshooter doesn't work (see step 4) then you can try and carry out the same process yourself manually: stopping the Windows Update service, deleting the temporary files it's created, then starting Windows Update again. It's a little more involved, but it's not difficult to do.

First, boot up into Safe Mode (see step 5), then access to the command prompt, the most basic of Windows interfaces: right-click on the Start menu, choose Command Prompt (Admin), and a text box should appear. Type "net stop wuauserv" and hit Enter, then follow that with "net stop bits" and hit Enter again.

8. Delete the Windows Update file cache yourself, part 2

Back in Windows proper, navigate to the C:\ Windows\ SoftwareDistribution folder, and delete everything you find therein. You're not going to break anything by doing this – these are just temporary files Windows creates so it knows where it's up to, and Windows Update will create them again from scratch.

With that done, go back to your command prompt window and type "net start wuauserv" (Enter) then "net start bits" (Enter) to get Windows Update and its related background services up and running again; hopefully this trick should be enough to kick-start the update that was previously stuck.

9. Launch a thorough virus scan

One of the more obscure reasons why a Windows update might not be installing is because a virus or some kind of spyware is blocking it: malicious apps like these can often be squashed by Windows security updates, which is why they try and stop the latest patches from being installed on your machine.

Try running a full and thorough virus scan using whatever security software you have installed (you do have some installed, right?). If you think your antivirus software has also been compromised you can download some on-demand scanners, like this one from Microsoft or this one from Dr. Web.

10. Run a full Windows reset

Restoring key Windows files and OS options is a lot easier than it used to be, and 'resetting' Windows 10 basically means putting all the system files back to their factory state without touching your personal files along the way (although you can choose to wipe your drive completely if you want).

You can find the option via the Recovery tab on the Update & Security page in the Settings app – note that third-party apps are removed too, so these will need installing again. Windows 8 offers both 'refresh' and 'reset' options, while on Windows 7 the reset option will typically have been provided by the PC's manufacturer.

Dave is a freelance tech journalist who has been writing about gadgets, apps and the web for more than two decades. On TechRadar you'll find him covering news, features and reviews, particularly for phones, tablets and wearables.

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/how-to/software/operating-systems/how-to-fix-a-stuck-windows-update-1326307

Frozen windows update

For the most part, Windows updates happen silently in the background, only installing after a prompt or when you shut down your PC. However, there are occasions when the update system needs a helping hand. If your Windows update runs into an error, you aren’t alone. This setback has been a widespread issue for the OS since Microsoft dropped their quality assurance team and relied on users through preview builds, feedback, and more.

How to Fix Windows 10 Update If It Freezes or Becomes Stuck

Perhaps your Windows 10 downloaded half of the update before deciding it doesn’t want to stay connected to the server. Other times, the OS fancies doing its own thing for a while, slowing your eagerly awaited update to a crawl. Other than those two situations, the OS may run into an installation bug or data problem that stops it in its tracks.

If Windows Update freezes or gets stuck, there are several steps to try. Here’s the process—in order of importance.

how_to_download_windows_10

Step 1: Run Windows Update Troubleshooter

The first step is the safest way to resolve Windows 10 Update issues. The process will automatically scan for and detect problems within your system, which can take a few minutes to complete.

  1. Open the Start menu and click on Settings. Windows Settings widget
  2. Next, click on Update & Security. Windows 10 Settings Menu - 3
  3. Then, click on Troubleshoot and then Additional troubleshooters. Windows 10 Troubleshoot Menu
  4. From there, choose Windows Update and then Run the troubleshooter.

The troubleshooter should hopefully clear up the problems causing Windows Update to get stuck.

Step 2: Delete Files in Software Distribution

If the troubleshooter does not resolve the update problem, it’s time to interact with your computer’s system settings. It shouldn’t cause any damage to your PC. You’ll only delete temporary Windows Update files, but it is recommended that you set up a System Restore point before going any further.

  1. Open the Start menu, type cmd into the Search box, then Command Prompt and choose Run as Administrator.Windows 10 Start Menu - 2
  2. Next, stop Windows Update Service and Background Intelligent Transfer Service. There are two commands you’ll need to type into the command prompt:

Press Enter after you type each one. This will turn off the Windows Update Service and Background Intelligent Transfer Service.

Winx Windows

3. Next, you’ll need to delete the files in the C:WindowsSoftwareDistribution folder. Select all files, then press Delete. If the files can’t be deleted because they’re in use, you’ll need to restart your PC. Turn off the two Windows Update services and then try to delete the files again.

Windows software distribution

4. Once the folder has been emptied, either restart your computer or manually turn on the Windows Update services. To do this, bring up the command prompt (admin) and type:

5. Now, run Windows Update and you’ll find that your PC needs to download a number of updates, which can take up to a few hours, depending on your system and connection.

windows updating

Once the updates have all been installed, Windows will schedule a restart time, although you can always restart immediately.

Step 3: Make a Quick-Fix Batch File

The following fix is a convenient way to execute several commands in one swoop. The script’s success level is subject to Windows changes through previous updates and the current condition of your OS. It may or may not work for you. Use it at your own risk!

The batch file (shown below) does the following, in exact order:

  1. Change the attributes of “system 32catroot” folder and the files within it
  2. Stops the Windows Update Service (wuauserv), Cryptographic services (CryptServ), and Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS)
  3. Rename the “system 32catroot” folder to “system32catroot.old”
  4. Rename the temporary Windows Update files folder “WindowsSoftwareDistribution” to “WindowsSoftwareDistribution.old”
  5. Rename the “All UsersApplication DataMicrosoftNetworkDownloader” folder to “All UsersApplication DataMicrosoftNetworkDownloader.old”
  6. Restart BITS.
  7. Restart CryptSvc.
  8. Restart wuauserv.

To run the batch file, copy the following script into notepad and save it to the Desktop as “UpdateFix.bat” to make it easy to find and to delete it when done. Right-click the batch file and select Run as Administrator. Restart Windows after the script completes successfully.

The script above allows Windows to create fresh update folders and data within them to eliminate any file corruption or incompatibilities.

Step 4: Identify Windows 10 Update Error Codes and Fix The Reported Issues

If none of the above options fixed your Windows Update problem, it is time to decipher the codes to discover the cause of failure—hopefully! Most update issues return an error code that identifies what caused the update to fail. The following table below provides the most common Windows 10 Update error codes and the possible solutions to fix them.

ERROR CODE(S)MEANING AND SOLUTION
0x80073712A file is damaged or missing that Windows 10 Update requires. Type “DISM.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth” without quotes to repair system files, then try to update the OS again.
0x800F0923A driver or program isn’t compatible with the upgrade (NOT update) to Windows 10 from Windows 7, 8, or 8.1. Backup your drivers and programs to preserve them, then uninstall the current graphics driver and let Windows switch to its default one. If that doesn’t work, try uninstalling other drivers. Also, ensure you have enough drive space for the upgrade.
0x80200056The upgrade process was interrupted from a manual restart, accidental shutoff, or user sign out. Simply try updating again.
0x800F0922

Scenario #1: The PC couldn’t connect to Windows Update servers. Disable the VPN (if applicable) and attempt to reinstall. Otherwise, try updating again when your internet connection is stable and reliable.

 

Scenario #2: There is a lack of free space in the System Reserved partition. Increase the partition’s size and try updating Windows again.

Error: We couldn’t complete the updates. Undoing changes. Don’t turn off your computer.

 

Error: Failure configuring Windows Updates. Reverting changes.

The PC failed to update for uncategorized or unknown issues. Any reasons not listed in specific error categories will produce one of these generic error messages. Review the update history to find the failed update and specific error code that triggered the problem. Resolve the issue, then try updating again.

Error: The update isn’t applicable to your computer.The Windows system does not have all the required updates installed to perform the OS upgrade. Run Windows Update to ensure all applicable updates are installed, then try upgrading again.
0xC1900208 – 0x4000CAn incompatible app blocked or interfered with the update process. Remove the app or program and try updating Windows 10 again.

0xC1900200 – 0x20008

0xC1900202 – 0x20008

The PC does not meet the minimum requirements to upgrade to Windows 10. Upgrade the PC hardware (if possible) or replace it.

0x80070070 – 0x50011

0x80070070 – 0x50012

0x80070070 – 0x60000

The PC does not have enough space to install Windows 10 update. Free up space on the OS partition and try again.
0xc1900223There is a problem with the download or installation files in the update. No action needed; the system will try again later.
0xC1900107A previous update is still in the cleanup process, usually awaiting a restart. Try restarting Windows and then attempt to install the new update again. If it fails, try using the Disk Cleanup utility, restart, and then attempt to update.
0x80300024A specific disk operation is not supported by the current drive. See detailed Windows 10 requirements to ensure the disk (partition or volume) is capable of any applicable requirements. If not, replace the drive.
0x80070002 0x20009Windows 10 Update cannot find a specific file, whether it is due to access rights, conflicting applications, or other plugged-in drives. Turn off any firewalls and close running applications. If that doesn’t work, try disconnecting all non-OS drives, rebooting the device, and trying to update again.
0xC1900101 0x20017
0xC1900101 0x30017
A driver issue caused a problem during the installation of the update. Disconnect all unnecessary devices such as USB drives, cameras, etc. and disable any anti-malware and anti-virus services.
0x8007042B 0x4000DWindows Update terminated unexpectedly due to an existing running process that interfered with operations. Perform a clean boot to eliminate any questionable processes and try to update again.
0x800700B7 0x2000aA security service, application, or process caused Windows Update to terminate unexpectedly. Disable all security applications and services, and then try updating again.
0xC1900101 – 0x20004Upgrading from Windows 7 or 8/8.1 has failed with an issue stating “The installation failed in the safe_OS phase with an error during INSTALL_RECOVERY_ENVIRONMENT operation.” The error is usually caused by a bios incompatibility or SATA configuration. Try updating your bios, removing all unnecessary SATA drives, unplugging all external USB drives, and disabling network devices in Windows 10 Device Manager (NOT by right-clicking elsewhere).
  

Step 5: Use System Restore

If your computer still isn’t responding when installing updates, you can run a System Restore. This will revert your PC to an earlier point in time.

  1. To access System Restore, type “System Restore” into the Search bar and select Create a restore point. Windows 10 Start Menu
  2. From System Restore you can pick an appropriate point to revert to.
Windows system restore

Once you’ve returned to an earlier restore point, try installing the updates again as normal.

Step 6: Use the Windows 10 Recovery Tool

If your Windows 10 device still isn’t updating or is still frozen on updating, then you’ll want to boot into the Windows 10 Recovery Tool and fix the drive or roll back to a previous restore point. If your device isn’t responding, then you’ll need to download this using another.

  1. If you haven’t already, start by downloading Windows Media Creation Tool, it’s also used for restoring/fixing your existing Windows OS.
  2. Next, plug in the USB with the recovery tool on it.
  3. Now, restart your device and then click either F8, F10, F12, or Del to enter the BIOS/UEFI, it varies based on the manufacturer.
  4. Next, look for Boot or Boot Order and click on it. Some BIOS keep it under System.
  5. Then, change the boot order so the Windows Media Creation Tool boots up first, you can usually just use the arrow keys to change the boot order.
  6. When the tool loads, select your language/preferences and click on Next.
  7. Now, select Repair your computer from the options.
  8. Then, start by trying to repair your disk with the sfc command, enter “sfc /scannow” without quotes and hit Enter in the command prompt.
  9. If that doesn’t work, you’ll want to use a previous restore point and roll back to it. Windows creates them by default when you download new programs, so you should have several to choose from

Take Away

Sometimes Windows 10 can run into problems when updating, luckily, you know what to do now if that happens. Start with the least complicated and permanent issue before resorting to previous restore points and more drastic solutions.

Do you know of any other ways to fix a Windows 10 update that’s stuck or frozen? Feel free to share it in the comments below.

Sours: https://www.alphr.com/microsoft/1001411/how-to-fix-windows-update-in-windows-10-if-it-becomes-stuck-1/
How to Fix Windows 10 Updates Taking Forever to Install

What to Do When Windows Update Gets Stuck or Is Frozen

Most of the time, Windows Update does its job with little if any attention from us.

While we might check and install updates manually from time to time, most Windows 10 computers are configured to apply important updates automatically, while older versions like Windows 7 and Windows 8 usually apply these fixes the night of Patch Tuesday.

Sometimes, however, when the patch, or maybe even service pack, is being installed during shutdown or startup, the update installation gets stuck—freezes, locks up, stops, hangs, clocks, whatever you want to call it. Windows Update is taking forever and it's clear something needs to be done.

The installation of one or more Windows updates is probably stuck or frozen if you see one of the following messages persist for a long time:

  • Preparing to configure Windows. / Do not turn off your computer.
  • Configuring Windows updates / x% complete / Do not turn off your computer.
  • Please do not power off or unplug your machine. / Installing update x of x...
  • Working on updates / x% complete / Don't turn off your computer
  • Keep your PC on until this is done / Installing update x of x...
  • Getting Windows ready / Don't turn off your computer

You might also see Stage 1 of 1 or Stage 1 of 3, or a similar message prior to the second example. Sometimes Restarting is all you'll see on the screen. There might also be some wording differences depending on which version of Windows you're using.

If you don't see anything at all on screen, especially if you think the updates might have been installed completely but could be the cause of whatever you're experiencing, see our How to Fix Problems Caused by Windows Updates tutorial instead.

Cause of a Frozen or Stuck Windows Update

There are several reasons why the installation or finalization of one or more Windows updates can hang.

Most often, these types of problems are due to a software conflict or a preexisting issue that simply wasn't brought to light until the Windows updates started installing. Much more rarely are they caused by a mistake on Microsoft's part regarding the update itself, but it does happen.

Any of Microsoft's operating systems could experience freezing issues during Windows updates including Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, and others.

There's an actual issue with Windows that can cause Windows Update installations to freeze like this but it's only applicable to Windows Vista and only if SP1 hasn't yet been installed. If your computer fits that description, install Windows Vista SP1 or later to solve the problem.

Make Sure the Updates Are Actually Stuck

Some Windows updates can take several minutes or more to configure or install, so you want to make sure the updates are truly stuck before moving on. Trying to fix a problem that doesn't really exist might just create a problem.

You can tell if Windows updates are stuck if nothing happens on screen for 3 hours or more. If there's any wonder after that long, take a look at your hard drive activity light. You'll see either no activity at all (stuck) or very regular but very short flashes of light (not stuck).

Chances are that the updates are hung before the 3-hour mark, but this is a reasonable amount of time to wait and longer than we've ever seen a Windows update take to successfully install.

How to Fix a Stuck Windows Update Installation

  1. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del. In some situations, the Windows update might be hung at a very particular part of the installation process, and you could be presented with your Windows login screen after executing the Ctrl+Alt+Del keyboard command.

    If so, log on as you normally would and let the updates continue to install successfully.

    If your computer restarts after Ctrl+Alt+Del, read the second Note in Step 2 below. If nothing happens (most likely) then move on to Step 2.

  2. Restart your computer using either the reset button or by powering it off and then back on with the power button. Windows will start normally and finish installing the updates.

    If the Windows update installation is truly frozen, you have no other choice but to hard-reboot.

    Depending on how Windows and BIOS/UEFI are configured, you might have to hold down the power button for several seconds before the computer will turn off. On a tablet or laptop, removing the battery may be necessary.

    If you're using Windows 10 or Windows 8, and you're taken to the sign-in screen after the restart, try tapping or clicking the power icon on the bottom-right and choosing Update and Restart, if available.

    If you're automatically taken to the Advanced Boot Options or Startup Settings menu after restarting, choose Safe Mode and see the comments in Step 3 below.

  3. Start Windows in Safe Mode. This special diagnostic mode of Windows only loads the minimum drivers and services that Windows absolutely needs, so if another program or service is conflicting with one of the Windows updates, the install might finish up just fine.

    If the Windows updates do install successfully and you continue to Safe Mode, just restart from there to enter Windows normally.

  4. Complete a System Restore to undo the changes made so far by the incomplete installation of the Windows updates.

    Since you can't access Windows normally, try doing this from Safe Mode. See the link in Step 3 if you're not sure how to start in Safe Mode.

    During the System Restore, be sure to choose the restore point created by Windows just prior to the update installation.

    Assuming a restore point was made and System Restore is successful, your computer should be returned to the state it was in before the updates started. If this problem occurred after automatic updating, like what happens on Patch Tuesday, be sure to change Windows Update settings so this problem doesn't reoccur on its own.

  5. Try System Restore from Advanced Startup Options (Windows 10 & 8) or System Recovery Options (Windows 7 & Vista) if you're not able to access Safe Mode or if the restore failed from Safe Mode.

    Since these menus of tools are available from "outside" of Windows, you can try this even if Windows is completely unavailable.

    System Restore is only available from outside of Windows if you're using Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7, or Windows Vista. This option is not available in Windows XP.

  6. Start your computer's "automatic" repair process. While a System Restore is a more direct way of undoing changes, in this case of a Windows update, sometimes a more comprehensive repair process is in order.

  7. Test your computer's memory. It's possible that failing RAM could be causing the patch installations to freeze. Fortunately, memory is really easy to test.

  8. Update BIOS. An outdated BIOS isn't a common cause for this problem, but it's possible.

    If one or more of the updates Windows is trying to install is involved with how Windows works with your motherboard or other built-in hardware, a BIOS update could solve the issue.

  9. Do a clean install of Windows. A clean install involves completely erasing the hard drive that Windows is installed on and then installing Windows again from scratch on that same hard drive. Obviously you don't want to do this if you don't have to, but it's a very likely fix if the steps prior to this one were unsuccessful.

    It might seem likely that reinstalling Windows, and then these same exact Windows updates, will cause the same problem, but that isn't usually what happens. Since most lockup issues caused by updates by Microsoft are actually software conflicts, a clean install of Windows, followed promptly by the installation of all available updates, usually results in a perfectly working computer.

Still Having Stuck/Freezing Issues Related to Windows Update?

If updates are stuck installing on or just after Patch Tuesday (the second Tuesday of the month), see our Details on the Latest Patch Tuesday piece for more on these specific patches.

How to Fix It When Windows 10 Won't Update

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Sours: https://www.lifewire.com/when-windows-update-gets-stuck-or-frozen-2624439

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The “Getting Windows ready, Don’t turn off your computer” message appears while Windows is installing updates. Windows will normally finish the installation process if you give it time—but, if it’s been hours, you may just need to restart your PC.

Unfortunately, it’s normal to wait a while for Windows to update, and this wastes an immense amount of time. Microsoft says there are about 700 million Windows 10 devices and that the April 2018 Update will take 10 to 30 minutes to install. So, assuming an average of 20 minutes for 700 million computers, that’s over 26,000 years of humanity’s collective time wasted waiting for Windows 10 to install a single update.

What Happens If You Restart Your PC?

The update installation process will fail if you restart your PC during this process. But how badly will it fail? Will it cause problems with your computer? To find out exactly what happens, we ran some tests.

First, we told Windows to install a standard update from Windows Update. We forcibly restarted our PC while the “Getting Windows ready. Don’t turn off your computer” message appeared on the screen. The PC restarted and we quickly saw the normal sign-in screen.

After we signed in, Windows displayed a “We couldn’t finish installing updates” notification. The update installation had failed, but Windows was still working properly. Windows will just try installing the update later.

Second, we restarted our PC while the screen said “Working on updates, 27% complete, Don’t turn off your computer.”

Windows restarted normally and we saw a message saying “We couldn’t complete the updates, Undoing changes, Don’t turn off your computer.” After the process was complete, Windows booted normally and everything worked as expected.

We also tested this process while installing a major Windows 10 update, going from the Fall Creators Update to the April 2018 Update. We rebooted our computer when the message “Configuring update for Windows 10, 10% complete, Do not turn off your computer” appeared on our screen.

After the computer restarted, we saw a simple “Please wait” message, and then the sign-in screen appeared normally. Once again, we saw the “We couldn’t finish installing updates” notification.

Finally, we tried restarting the PC when it said “Working on updates 48%, Don’t turn off your PC. This will take a while.” A “Restoring your previous version of Windows…” message appeared as Windows rolled back the update, and our PC booted and worked normally afterwards.

In every test, turning off the computer didn’t cause any problems. Windows just decided to stop updating and roll back any files that were updated. Windows does insist on re-downloading the update before trying to install it again, just in case there was a problem with the download. The updates then installed normally afterwards.

How Long Should You Wait?

Be patient and give Windows some time to finish installing updates if this message appears on your screen. Depending on how big an update Windows has to install and how slow your computer and its internal storage are, this process could take a while to complete.

It’s common for this message to appear on your screen for up to five minutes. However, if this message has appeared on your screen for a long time, you may need to restart your PC. We recommend waiting two hours, just in case Windows is doing a lot of work. Windows may just need some time to finish the process, especially if it’s a big update and your hard drive is slow and full.

If you see a percentage number on your screen and it’s increasing, leave Windows alone as long as it appears to be making progress. If the percentage appears stuck on a particular number for a long time, the update process may be stuck. However, it’s normal for Windows to appear “stuck” at a particular point for a long time before speeding through the rest of the installation process, so don’t be too impatient.

Yes, You Should Turn Off Your Computer If It Gets Stuck Here

As we’ve shown above, restarting your PC should be safe. After you reboot, Windows will stop trying to install the update, undo any changes, and go to your sign-in screen. Windows will try reinstalling the update again later, and it should hopefully work the second time. This shouldn’t be necessary, but Windows has bugs, and sometimes you have to restart your PC to fix them. This is true even when Windows is telling you not to turn off your computer.

To turn off your PC at this screen—whether it’s a desktop, laptop, tablet—just long-press the power button. Hold it down for about ten seconds. This performs a hard shut down. Wait a few seconds, and then turn your PC back on. Performing a hard shut down is never ideal, but it may be your only option in cases like this.

Warning: While we’ve successfully tested this process, there are no guarantees that your Windows operating system will work properly after you perform a hard shut down. However, if the update process is actually frozen, performing a hard shut down is the only thing you can do. We recommend always having backups of your important personal files, just in case.

RELATED:What's the Best Way to Back Up My Computer?

How to Repair Windows If It’s Not Working Properly

Simply restarting your computer should fix the problem. However, if your PC still doesn’t start properly, you have another system problem. Restarting your computer may not have even caused the problem—your computer may have gotten stuck at the “Getting Windows ready” message because the Windows operating system already had an error.

You can often use the Startup Repair tool to fix Windows. An advanced boot options menu is supposed to appear when Windows doesn’t boot properly. Select Troubleshoot > Advanced Options > Startup Repair if you see an advanced boot options menu. If the menu doesn’t appear, you can create Windows 10 installation media, boot from it, and then select the “Repair your computer” option.

If even Startup Repair won’t fix your problem, you may need to use the “Reset this PC” feature or even reinstall Windows to get a fresh, functioning operating system.

If you can boot into Windows, but it doesn’t seem to be running properly, you can also try repairing corrupted system files with the System File Checker (SFC) command instead of reinstalling Windows. You can also try running System Restore to get your operating system back to a known-good state.

If your computer doesn’t perform well even after you reinstall Windows, you probably have a hardware problem instead of a software problem.

RELATED:How to Fix Startup Problems with the Windows Startup Repair Tool

Image Credit: hawaya/Shutterstock.com.

Sours: https://www.howtogeek.com/356953/how-to-fix-a-pc-stuck-on-dont-turn-off-during-windows-updates/


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