The evil within wikipedia

The Evil Within

Released

October 14, 2014 (EU)
October 14, 2014 (NA)
October 16, 2014 (AU)
October 23, 2014 (JP)

Ratings

Platforms

Microsoft Windows
Playstation 3
Playstation 4
Xbox 360
Xbox One

Media

BluRay Disc, Optical disc, Digital Download

The Evil Within, also known as Psychobreak (サイコブレイク,Saikobureiku?) in Japan, is a survival-horror video game developed by Tango Gameworks and published by Bethesda Softworks. The game was directed by Shinji Mikami, the creator of Resident Evil & a former Resident Evil 4director. The game utilizes id Tech 5 enginethat has been modified to suit the game.

The Evil Within was released on October 14 2014 for PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One.

Plot

Detective Sebastian Castellanos and his partners, Joseph Oda and Juli Kidman arrive at a crime scene located at the Beacon Memorial Hospital.

Having arrived, they find a massacre has taken place inside the hospital, with the place now seemingly deserted. After finding a sole survivor, Sebastian witnesses through the hospital CCTV, fellow K.C.P.D officers running from and firing upon an unseen force. They are then brutally killed by a disfigured, supernatural, hooded man, who then appears behind Sebastian and attacks him, knocking him unconscious. Sebastian then awakes in the basement of the Hospital, and is forced to flee from a monstrous man wielding a chainsaw.

Upon reuniting with his colleagues, they attempt to escape via ambulance while Krimson City is destroyed and rearranged by Ruvik's will, eventually causing them to crash. Freeing himself from the wreckage, Sebastian wanders through unnatural forests and abandoned buildings full of monstrous creatures, and witnesses the apparition of a disfigured man in a white hood. Trapped in the nightmare world, Sebastian encounters one of Beacon's doctors, Marcelo Jimenez, who is searching for his patient, Leslie Withers. Jimenez identifies the hooded stranger stalking them as Ruvik.

Sebastian eventually reunites with Joseph, though it is shortly revealed that Joseph is suffering from a strange form of transformation which compels him into a murderous rage. While he is able to control it for the most part, Joseph warns Sebastian to be wary of him if he turns. The two eventually find and rescue Kidman from drowning in a crude contraption, though they are soon separated again after hearing the high pitched noise.

Elsewhere, Kidman is being forced to relive memories of her indoctrination into an organization known as Mobius. It is revealed that Kidman is actually an undercover agent, sent by Mobius to retrieve Leslie from Jimenez, apparently as leverage to force Jimenez to continue working for them. Jimenez had been working with Mobius on a project known as STEM - a machine capable of uniting minds into one, with one influencing mind at its center. Jimenez activated STEM without Mobius' permission - signaled by the high-pitched noise - but Mobius anticipated this, and trained Kidman to navigate the STEM world and retrieve Leslie.

Sebastian learns of the story of Ruvik, born Ruben Victoriano, through various memories that Ruvik places him in. Ruben was an intellectually gifted but mentally unstable child, and was close to his sister, Laura. While playing in a barn on their family's estate, Laura was killed and Ruben severely burned after the barn was set on fire as an act of revenge against their parents. Ruben's father began hiding him in the basement of the family manor. Deeply traumatized over Laura's death, Ruben eventually killed both of his parents, took control of their fortune, and continued to "donate" money to Beacon Mental Hospital in exchange for test subjects for his experiments into the human psyche.

Ruvik began designing STEM as a means for him to reshape reality, so that he could physically travel back into his memories and live his life again with Laura. Jimenez then took notice of Ruvik's work, and revealed it to Mobius, who wished to use it for their own purposes. However, with the machine only being calibrated to work with Ruvik as its center, Mobius were forced to use Ruvik's brain after killing him, which allowed Ruvik to maintain control of the STEM world. Kidman realizes that Mobius in fact wants the meek Leslie as a replacement for Ruvik's brain - an easily manipulated 'blank slate' mind, which they can use to power STEM and create a world of their own design.

When Dr. Jimenez, aided by Sebastian, tries to use Leslie to return to reality, he realizes that Ruvik wants to transfer his mind to a compatible host, and escape into the real world. A beast created from Ruvik's subconscious then kills Jimenez, and Ruvik scatters the group across his mind. Kidman finds Leslie first, and is about to shoot him to prevent Ruvik from using him as a host, when Sebastian and Joseph intervene, prompting her to shoot Joseph, before Ruvik separates them again. Kidman tries desperately to turn against Mobius, but realizes that she has been given a serum which has allowed Mobius to travel into the STEM world with her.

Sebastian finds Leslie, and guides him back to the hospital. At the top of the lighthouse, he sees his own body in a bathtub hooked to the STEM machine. Kidman arrives and attempts to convince Sebastian that Leslie has to die. Ruvik interrupts them, gets hold of Leslie, and absorbs him.

Sebastian battles a gigantic creature created from Ruvik's subconscious and defeats it, waking up in the bathtub. He pulls himself off the machine, removes Ruvik's brain from the STEM, and crushes it. He wakes up in the tub again with Kidman by his side, monitoring him and Joseph, who is unconscious in a second tub next to him; Kidman motions for Sebastian to stay quiet. Sebastian falls unconscious, and later wakes up in the same tub, with no one around except for the bodies of Jimenez and Connelly. As police and S.W.A.T. reinforcements arrive, Sebastian exits the hospital and notices Leslie walking out of the main gates. Sebastian has a brief headache — a sign of Ruvik’s influence on subjects within the STEM — which causes him to lose sight of Leslie. It is implied that Ruvik has returned to the real world, and is able to influence those who were connected to his machine, intending to take revenge on the organization that betrayed him[citation needed].

Gameplay

The game primarily focuses on 3 key gameplay elements:

  • Survival Horror - The player must navigate through the hostile game world with limited resources. This requires the player to use their wits to survive and correctly manage their few resources as they encounter various terrors and dangers throughout the game.
  • Traps and Puzzles - The player not only needs to struggle to survive, but also face dangerous traps and mechanisms. Being careless with traps can cause death. However, the player can also utilize the traps to their own advantage.
  • Alternating Environments - Throughout the game, the environments may change without warning in real-time based on the player's actions, adding more variables to the game.

While exploring, the camera is set behind the player and is able to freely move them around. However, the camera can also change views sometimes. During combat, aiming puts the camera in over-the-shoulder mode. Combat isn't usually forced upon the player; as supplies are scarce in the game, the player can run away and hide, avoid the enemy by sneaking or performing stealth kills. The player also has access to a last resort weapon called the Agony Crossbow, capable of utilizing various bolts. The player can shoot them either at enemies or onto surfaces, setting them up as traps.

In case of inventory managing, the player can bring up a circular menu to change items/weapons anytime. At the same time, the player is also able to set the items to a designated shortcut so that they are able to quickly change items/weapons in real-time. Depending on the difficulty, the player can only carry a specified amount of items and ammunition by default, but can choose to upgrade the amount later on. 

Enemies

  • The Haunted - The most common enemies in the entire game. They are hapless victims who lost themselves to the destructive and uncontrollable nature of the STEM system, twisting and deforming their appearances into hideous zombie-like beings, melded awry with objects like barbed wire, glass, rope and nails. They can wield an incredible variety of weapons, and at times can demonstrate impressive combat maneuvers. Though they endure a tremendous amount of damage in battle, they have a particular weakness to fire, similarly to the man who took of them their lives, Ruvik. They can also be found in an invisible variety.
  • AlterEgo - In contrast to the Haunted, AlterEgos are victims of STEM who had dissociative identity disorder, and as such, both of the consciousness' manifested themselves within the system, becoming shambling husks of their former selves: pink, corpse-like creatures, pulsating muscles bursting through their stomachs, and two heads fighting over the same body, the hostile personality overtaking the host personality, living off of it like a parasite, spewing acid from its tumor-like maw, razor-sharp teeth always snapping, moaning in agony. If they come near Sebastian they will slash at him with their bone-claw like hands, or try and grab him and take a substantial amount of health by biting into him. They will also vomit acid, and, at times, release an insectoid-like creature from it's stomach at the end of a long tentacle, crushing Sebastian's head if it manages to latch on. These foul creatures are brought down quickest by destroying the parasite head. Newborn versions of these creatures, known as The Babies, can be seen crawling and hopping around in a few places of the game, and can easily be killed by stomping and kicking, or simply walking on them.  
  • Trauma - Tall, naked humanoids with pale skin and drooping flesh where a face would normally be. They are manifestations of Ruvik's immense hatred for the religion that was brought upon him as a child, shown by the large wooden beams they carry on their backs. They have no forearms, but rather a massive hook-clawed gauntlet attached to their right arm, while their left arm chained to the beam on it's back, which it will angrily tear off if it is damaged enough. Apart from slashing at Sebastian with their gauntlets, or charging at him with them plowing the ground, they will sometimes lob the large hook (chained to the second beam) forward several feet, attempting to snag Sebastian, and pull him back to them, impaling him on their gauntlets. 
  • The Keeper - A dangerous being within STEM that has a safe wrapped in barbed wire for a head, as a manifestation of the safe where Ruvik kept his research. He wields a large meat tenderizer which is also wrapped in barbed wire as well as a spiked sack filled with the brains of his victims. When killed he will reanimate through a nearby safe. His appearance is similar to that of a butcher, as he wears a plastic apron and protective gloves.
  • Laura - The horrific reincarnation of Ruvik's sister, who perished in a barn fire to save her brother's life. Ruvik longed to be with her so much that his memory of her manifested itself within STEM, twisted by his rage. She has long black hair and four strong arms with long, sharp claws. Though she wears no clothes, she still has shoes on her feet. Similarly to the Haunted and Ruvik himself, it is revealed that she too has a particular weakness to fire.
  • Sadist - A large deranged man wearing a metal apparatus over his face who heavily enjoys mutilating others with his chainsaw, the Sadist is a recurring foe and the first opponent that Sebastian will face in his journey. Though he is usually seen wielding his barbed-wire chainsaw, he can also be seen using a butcher's knife and a rocket launcher.
  • Sentinel - A massive guard dog seen outside of Cedar Hill Church, which Sebastian must battle to escape with Joseph and find Leslie in the church. The Sentinel is Nearly seven feet tall, with patches of fur missing, and barbed wire wrapped around the entirety of it's body, as well as orbitoclasts and railroad spikes impaled into it in various areas. It's face seems almost paralyzed, apart from its ability to howl, and a veiny, festering growth leading to the massive maw protruding from it's throat seems to have rendered its lower jaw deformed. Next to it's original eye, now glazed over and milky white, is a massive, yellow eye that seems connected to the growth. It has grown feral due to a consistant diet of human flesh "offerings".
  • Zehn - One of the twin giants found chained up within the courtyard before the church. He was left on the doorstep of the church, and soon grew nearly ten feet tall. The right side of the face seems to have a bothersome deformity, resembling a healed burn wound. He wields a stone club, which he will swing about wildly, sometimes even throwing.
  • Neun - One of the giants found chained up within the courtyard before the church, and twin brother to Zehn. He was so unstable that a mask was placed over his head, making it so he couldn't see or hear anything. He has a chain protruding outwards from his heart as well. In contrast to his brother, Neun will fight using his arms and legs, and his signature finishing move is to tear Sebastian's arms off and step on his face.
  • Heresy - A massive, pustule, spider-like creature born as a result of a person who lost their identity to STEM and went on a rampage, devouring anyone he found. He now has numerous tubes connecting his face to his anus, living eternally off of his own fecal matter. He is the predominant entity found roaming throughout Krimson City, chasing Sebastian and his partners throughout the city, eventually latching onto their bus and battling them. Apart from shaking the bus and using various attack patterns with his legs, he will also release large centipede-like creatures from his tumorous gumma-like masses.
  • Doppelgangers - The results of test subjects who connected on a closer level to Ruvik himself while inside STEM, (though not on a level as close as Leslie's) becoming a doppelganger of him, appearing almost identical in appearance, save for wearing a mental patient outfit rather than no shirt, and having no head inside their hood, only darkness. They can summon Laura-like hands from puddles of blood that will chase Sebastian relentlessly, unless the doppelganger is knocked over or killed. If they catch Sebastian, they will drag him under.
  • Quell - A horrid creature born from Ruvik's desire to remain unseen by others, as evidenced by its inherent ability to turn invisible. It possesses six tentacles, which it uses to catch it's victims, and atop its torso is a head with no eyes, but a large mouth that can unhinge back to reveal layers of sharp, jagged teeth. It prefers to hunt it's prey from the shadows, but when forced to, it will come out and fight in the open. It possesses several unique abilities, such as spraying black ink, similarly to an octopus, which will make Sebastian dizzy. It can leap great distances, and move incredibly fast when slithering along the floor or through pipes. When hiding, it will spawn out slug-like creatures that will chase Sebastian around. When invisible, it can be found sticking to walls, the ground, or even sneaking up on Sebastian.
  • Amalgam Alpha - The Amalgam Alpha is a beast manifested from the final consciousness of subjects who died while connected to STEM, forming a hulking monstrosity that can teleport to locations and chase Sebastian, or even teleport him, although it lives in the parking garage, where it prowls around on all four of it's limbs searching out victims to devour with the long retractable eyestalk that can emerge from it's back. At the front of it's body are two large heads missing their lower jaws and noses., and with black marks sewn into their forheads where their eyes would be. Atop the base of it's body is the upper half of a man, flopping around in agony as the creature moves. Chains jangle from it's limbs, which serve as both arms and legs. Apart from leaping and using it's body mass, the creature can also pick Sebastian up, and reverse it's body, opening up a gaping aperture in it's body with a purple glow. It's eye will then end up there, though if it catches Sebastian it will swallow him whole. The eyestalk is it's weakness, although it will only reveal itself if Sebastian is well-hidden, save for it's second form.
  • Shigyo - An aquatic being born from the consciousness of a woman who drowned while connected to the STEM. It has a relatively bony physique, but possesses long arms, which it uses to pull under anyone who it can't catch with it's mouth. It's body ends in a fish-like tail, and it's head has strands of long, stringy black hair. It's enormous mouth is the only quantifiable feature of it's head, with numerous crooked teeth held down by braces, a manifestation of how unhappy the woman was with her crooked teeth. The creature cannot be fought, and should be avoided at all costs in underwater environments.
  • Ruvik - The main antagonist of the game, Ruvik is the man who developed the STEM system almost entirely by himself, and with his brain at the center, he has complete control over everything within it, turning it into a terrible nightmare world that reflects his own psychotic mind. He possesses all manner of abilities within the world he has created, though most frequently used by him are teleporting himself and others, and summoning monsters. He appears as a menacing young man wearing a hooded cloak and pants, the rest of his body ravished by burn scars that constantly cause him pain. The right half of his head is covered with a glass plate, exposing his brain. His primary goal throughout the game is to escape STEM and once again wreak havoc in the real world, seeking vengeance against those who took his life away from him.
  • Amalgam - A creature that serves as the final boss of the game. It is a combination of Ruvik and the Amalgam Alpha, among other things, forming a beast nearly 100 feet tall, with various deformed limbs, and a glass dome over it's brain, where Ruvik controls it from. When it's brain is damaged, it's head will transform, a mouth stretching the flesh of the brain and reappearing there.

Weapons

Sours: https://theevilwithin.fandom.com/wiki/The_Evil_Within

The Evil Within 2

2017 third-person survival horror video game

2017 video game

The Evil Within 2[a] is a third-personsurvival horror video game developed by Tango Gameworks and published by Bethesda Softworks for PlayStation 4, Windows and Xbox One. It was released worldwide in October 2017 and is the sequel to 2014's The Evil Within.[1] The game received generally positive reviews; it received praise for its visuals, atmosphere and gameplay but received some criticism for its story and characters.

Gameplay[edit]

Sebastian exploring the world

Similar to its predecessor, the game is a survival horror game. Played from a third-person perspective, the player assumes control of detective Sebastian Castellanos, who must descend into the world of Union to rescue his daughter, Lily. There are three difficulty modes, namely Casual, which producer Shinji Mikami recommends,[2] Survival, and Nightmare, the latter setting being recommended for players who enjoyed the difficulty curve in the previous game.[3] In The Evil Within 2, maps are larger and there are multiple ways for players to advance in a level. The player is also given an item known as "The Communicator", which helps to highlight the objectives, resources and enemies featured in the game's world. It also reveals Resonance points, which provides hints regarding what had happened in the world of Union. Players can explore the map area freely to complete side objectives and scout for resources, which are scarce. Players can engage in direct confrontation with enemies using weapons like guns, or use stealth to prevent themselves from being noticed or sneak behind enemies to kill them silently.[4]

The game features a crafting system, in which players can gather resources to craft new items such as ammo. Players can craft items at any time in the game, but doing so in a workbench requires fewer crafting materials.[5] A customization system is also present. The Green Gel, introduced in the first game, can be used to customize Sebastian's abilities, which are divided into five different trees: health, stealth, combat, recovery and athleticism. Weapons can be customized using the weapon parts players collected through exploring Union.[4]

Plot[edit]

Three years after the events of the first game, Sebastian Castellanos (Marqus Bobesich) has left the Krimson City Police Department, haunted by his experiences at the Beacon Mental Hospital. His only child, Lily (Kiara Gamboa), supposedly perished in their house fire, and his wife Myra (Elizabeth Saydah), unwilling to accept her daughter's death, abandoned him. This, coupled with his trauma, results in Sebastian descending into alcoholism. Drowning his sorrows in a bar, Sebastian is approached by former partner and Mobius agent Juli Kidman (Meg Saricks), who reveals that Lily is still alive. Sebastian is brought to a secret Mobius facility against his will, where he meets the head of the facility named the Administrator (Richard Neil). The Administrator explains that Lily is being used as the Core for a new STEM system to simulate an idyllic American town called Union. However, Mobius lost contact with Lily and their agents inside Union, and they have lost control over the simulation. Sebastian reluctantly agrees to help and is plugged into STEM.

Upon entering Union, Sebastian discovers the town has turned into a nightmare realm where all of the inhabitants were either killed or mutated into monsters. In addition, Sebastian witnesses a mysterious photographer with supernatural powers hunting down and murdering Mobius operatives. He manages to find surviving Mobius personnel Liam O'Neal (Jesse LeNoir), Yukiko Hoffman (Ying Hsiao), and Julian Sykes (Hari Williams), who help him in the search for Lily. As Sebastian follows her trail, he learns that she has been kidnapped by the photographer Stefano Valentini (Rafael Goldstein), a serial killer obsessed with photographing people at the moment of their death who managed to infiltrate Union. Stefano reveals that he had originally kidnapped Lily under orders from another party, but decided to keep her for himself to exploit her powers as the Core. Sebastian fights and kills Stefano but before he can rescue Lily, Myra appears and takes Lily away. Sebastian finds himself transported to the interior of a mysterious stronghold-like area, where he is approached by Father Theodore Wallace (Ron Sewer), who attempts to convince Sebastian to join him to seize Lily from Myra since Stefano betrayed him. Sebastian refuses and is banished to a forest outside Union where he meets with Mobius operative Esmeralda Torres (Crash Barrera). Upon reaching her safe house, Torres reveals that she, Kidman, Myra, and Theodore had conspired to break Lily out of STEM and destroy Mobius from within via their chip implants. However, the plan went awry when Theodore became mentally unstable and decided to kidnap Lily for himself.

Seeing Theodore as the most immediate threat, Sebastian goes to confront him, but is forced to kill a brainwashed Liam. Upon reaching Theodore, Sebastian is immediately incapacitated when Theodore uses Sebastian's own lingering guilt against him and he falls unconscious. Sebastian is visited by a vision of Myra, who assures him that what happened to Lily was not his fault and that he should focus on saving her. When he wakes up, he finds out that Esmeralda had sacrificed herself to get him to safety and that Theodore has erected his stronghold in the center of Union. Both Sebastian and Yukiko assault Theodore's stronghold, though Yukiko dies in the process. Sebastian is able to confront and defeat Theodore, only for Myra to arrive and kill Theodore herself while warning Sebastian to stay away from her and Lily.

Sebastian follows Myra, whose desire to protect Lily has made her insane and obsessed with keeping Lily locked in the STEM for her own "safety". Myra lashes out at him, forcing him to shoot her, triggering her transformation into a large being called 'The Matriarch', forcing Sebastian to reluctantly battle her. Sebastian defeats the monster, releasing Myra and knocking her back to her senses. He prepares to take Lily out of STEM, but Myra refuses to follow, explaining that as part of the plan to destroy Mobius, she must take Lily's place as the Core of STEM to transmit the implant-destroying signal. Meanwhile, in the real world, Kidman is ordered by the Administrator to eliminate Sebastian. She disobeys him and helps Sebastian and Lily escape the STEM while Myra enacts her plan, killing the Administrator and all Mobius operatives (except Kidman who has removed the microchip from her brain). Now free from Mobius, Sebastian, Lily, and Kidman leave the facility.

In a post-credits scene, Sebastian parts ways with Kidman and goes off to live a new life with Lily. Back at the now abandoned Mobius facility, the STEM system mysteriously reactivates itself.

Development[edit]

Shinji Mikami, director of the first game, supervised The Evil Within 2's development.

Development for The Evil Within 2 began in March 2015, after the team at Tango Gameworks wrapped up the development of the downloadable content for the first game. Director Shinji Mikami stepped down and became game producer and supervised the game's development. Mikami said the development period was quite a bit shorter than it had been for its predecessor.[6] The director role was assigned to John Johanas, described by Mikami as a person with "a lot of talent".[7] The story of the game was penned by Syoji Ishimine and Trent Haaga. One of their focuses was to make the game's story easier for players to comprehend and understand, a response to the criticism of the first game where the game's plot gets too complicated by the end. Shifting realities, a feature in the first game, also returns in the sequel but according to Johanas, "there's a bit more logic to when and how it happens". The 2.5:1 aspect ratio featured in the first game was removed due to the mixed response this design choice had received upon its release, even though the team liked it.[8] While the game retains the gore-horror featured dominantly in the original game, the writing team also put effort into creating the game's psychological horror aspect, as the game tells a story that is more personal.[9]

In August 2016, Pete Hines, an executive from publisher Bethesda Softworks, revealed that The Evil Within had sold enough copies to warrant a sequel, though he declined to comment on whether a new game is in development.[10] The game was leaked in March 2017, in which a job description for Psycho Break 2, the game's Japanese title, was leaked.[11] An advertisement for the game was prematurely posted on Reddit,[12] several hours prior to the game's official announcement at Bethesda's Electronic Entertainment Expo 2017 press conference.[13]

Unlike its predecessor, which ran on id Software's id Tech 5 engine, The Evil Within 2 runs on the STEM engine, an offshoot of id Tech that was custom developed by Tango Gameworks for the game.[14]

Reception[edit]

Reception

The Evil Within 2 received "generally favorable" reviews according to review aggregatorMetacritic.[15][16][17]

Ray Porreca's score of 7/10 on Destructoid said it was "Solid and definitely has an audience. There could be some hard-to-ignore faults, but the experience is fun."[18]

Mollie L Patterson said on Electronic Gaming Monthly, "Though I never expected to ever see a sequel to The Evil Within, we've now gotten one, and I'm rather glad that we did. While The Evil Within 2 isn't without problems—and I'm not sure it's the kind of game I'll ever want to play through a second time—by the time the final credits rolled, I had legitimately enjoyed the adventure I'd just gone on, and the improvements that Tango Gameworks had tried to bring to the series.[19]

Game Informer's Suriel Vazquez awarded the game a 7.75/10, stating that "The Evil Within 2 is a solid horror game that expands the scope of the series to extend out of the shadow of a titan in the horror genre, even if it sometimes leans heavily on borrowed ideas. Its progression and difficulty curve create a satisfying loop that repays resourcefulness and strategy, but its set pieces and structure don't build enough on the many ideas they borrow to make them feel new or interesting. The result is a ride that offers some fun thrills in the moment, but I don't think I'll lose too much sleep over these particular nightmares."[20]

Paul Tamburro of Game Revolution awarded it 3.5 out of 5 stars stating that "The Evil Within 2 is a worthy sequel that makes a number of bold decisions. For those solely looking for the survival horror thrills of the first game, its spotlight upon combat will likely be a disappointment, as will its introduction of a dull open world. However, there's plenty tucked away in The Evil Within 2 that will appeal to both fans of the original and new players, with it presenting a mix of Mikami's best ideas and John Johanas' new direction. It's certainly not what I was expecting, but in a good way."[21]

Alessandro Fillari's 8/10 score on GameSpot stated that "Though there's some occasional technical hiccups that result in some particularly frustrating moments and weird pacing issues, this horror sequel elevates the tense and impactful survival horror experience in ways that feel fresh and exciting. What this cerebral horror game does isn't totally new, but it rarely feels routine, and offers plenty of surprises. Coming in at a lengthy and surprisingly packed 15-hour campaign, the sequel does an admirable job of ratcheting up the tension and scares when it needs to, while also giving you the freedom to explore and proceed how you want. It's a tough thing to balance, but The Evil Within 2 does it remarkably well, and in a way that leaves a strong and lasting impression after its touching conclusion."[22]

Lucas Sullivan from GamesRadar gave the game a score of 3.5 out of 5 stars saying that "Though it doesn't outdo its predecessor, The Evil Within 2 delivers another fun, challenging, tense horror headtrip that should delight fans of the first game."[23]

Lucy O'Brien of IGN gave the game 8/10, concluding that "The Evil Within 2 is an intense and exhilarating survival horror experience."[24]

80/100 was Joe Donnelly's score on PC Gamer and said it was "An intense and thrilling psychological survival horror sequel that improves on its forerunner in almost every way."[25]

"The Evil Within 2 represents one of the starkest and most astounding turnarounds from a debut title to its sequel that I've ever witnessed. It's a brilliant horror game, one that understands when to ratchet up tension and when to pull back and let you collect yourself. If the first game was a failed attempt to capture the spirit of Shinji Mikami's classic Resident Evil 4, the sequel is a successful attempt at something much better: finding a chilling, exhilarating voice of its own," was Philip Kollar's conclusion on Polygon with a score of 9/10.[26] The website later ranked the game 21st on their list of the 50 best games of 2017.[27]

Sales[edit]

The Evil Within 2 sold 42,941 copies on PlayStation 4 within its first week on sale in Japan, which placed it at number three on the all format sales chart.[28]

Accolades[edit]

The game was nominated for "Best Action Game" in PC Gamer's 2017 Game of the Year Awards,[29] for "Best Action-Adventure Game" in IGN's Best of 2017 Awards.[30] and for "Game, Franchise Action" at the National Academy of Video Game Trade Reviewers Awards.[31][32]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Known in Japan as PsychoBreak 2 (Japanese: サイコブレイク2, Hepburn: Saiko Bureiku 2)

References[edit]

  1. ^Vazquez, Suriel (June 11, 2017). "Bethesda Announces Evil Within 2, Coming In October". Game Informer. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  2. ^Donnelly, Joe (August 8, 2017). "Shinji Mikami recommends playing The Evil Within 2 on 'Casual' setting". PC Gamer. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  3. ^"The Evil Within 2 Offers More Freedom, A Crafting System, And More Focus On Its Story". Siliconera. August 8, 2017. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  4. ^ abHester, Blake (August 4, 2017). "'The Evil Within 2' Will Allow Players More Options to Play Their Own Way, Dev Says". Rolling Stone. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  5. ^Schaefer, Emma (August 4, 2017). "The Evil Within 2's crafting system is entirely different—and way deeper". Electronic Gaming Monthly. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  6. ^"The Evil within 2 Doesn't Want to "Suffocate" You with Horror Elements".
  7. ^Birch, Nathan (August 12, 2017). "Resident Evil Creator Shinji Mikami Reveals How Involved He Is With The Evil Within 2". Comic Book.com. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  8. ^O'Brien, Lucy (August 10, 2017). "The Evil Within 2: Shinji Mikami Talks His Input On The Sequel". IGN. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  9. ^Donnelly, Joe (August 4, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 pushes psychological horror 'much harder' than original". PC Gamer. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  10. ^Makuch, Eddie (August 10, 2016). "The Evil Within and Rage Did Well Enough to Get Sequels, But It's Too Soon to Get Your Hopes Up". GameSpot. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  11. ^"The Evil Within 2 in development hints leaked job description". Metro. March 20, 2017. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  12. ^Lemon, Marshall (June 11, 2017). "Leaked ads point to The Evil Within sequel". VG 247. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  13. ^Matulef, Jeffery (June 12, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 officially revealed". Eurogamer. Retrieved August 15, 2017.
  14. ^Linneman, John (October 17, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 Shines on PS4 But Xbox One and PC Fall Short". Eurogamer. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  15. ^ ab"The Evil Within 2 for PC Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  16. ^ ab"The Evil Within 2 for PlayStation 4 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  17. ^ ab"The Evil Within 2 for Xbox One Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  18. ^ abPorreca, Ray (October 18, 2017). "Review: The Evil Within 2". Destructoid. Retrieved October 18, 2017.
  19. ^ abPatterson, Mollie L. (October 19, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 review". Electronic Gaming Monthly. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  20. ^ abVazquez, Suriel (October 12, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 - A Diluted Concoction". Game Informer. Retrieved October 12, 2017.
  21. ^ abTamburro, Paul (October 12, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 Review – Not What You Were Expecting". Game Revolution. Retrieved October 12, 2017.
  22. ^ abFillari, Alessandro (October 12, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 Review". GameSpot. Retrieved October 13, 2017.
  23. ^ abSullivan, Lucas (October 13, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 review: 'It'll make the hairs on your neck prickle right up'". GamesRadar. Retrieved October 13, 2017.
  24. ^ abO'Brien, Lucy (October 12, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 Review". IGN. Retrieved October 12, 2017.
  25. ^ abDonnelly, Joe (October 16, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 review". PC Gamer. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  26. ^ abKollar, Philip (October 18, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 review". Polygon. Retrieved October 18, 2017.
  27. ^Polygon staff (December 18, 2017). "The 50 best games of 2017". Polygon. Retrieved February 12, 2018.
  28. ^Romano, Sal (October 25, 2017). "Media Create Sales: 10/16/17 – 10/22/17". Gematsu. Retrieved March 8, 2018.
  29. ^PC Gamer staff (December 8, 2017). "Games of the Year 2017: The nominees". PC Gamer. Retrieved February 12, 2018.
  30. ^"Best of 2017 Awards: Best Action-Adventure Game". IGN. December 20, 2017. Retrieved February 12, 2018.
  31. ^"Nominee List for 2017". National Academy of Video Game Trade Reviewers. February 9, 2018. Retrieved February 17, 2018.
  32. ^"Horizon wins 7; Mario GOTY". National Academy of Video Game Trade Reviewers. March 13, 2018. Retrieved March 14, 2018.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Evil_Within_2
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Welcome to the The Evil Within Wiki

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The Evil Within and The Evil Within 2 are survival horror video games developed by Tango Gameworks, in association with Shinji Mikami, and published by Bethesda Softworks. The first game was released on October 21st, 2014 in North America and October 24th in the EU. The second was released on October 13, 2017.

The wiki was created in April, 2013 and currently hosts 569 articles

The Assignment

Learn more about the first Downloadable Content

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Creatures

Learn more about the terrifying creatures of The Evil Within

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The Evil Within, known in Japan as Psychobreak, is a survival horror video game developed by Tango Gameworks and published by Bethesda Softworks. The game was released on Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One, on October 14th, 2014. The player follows Detective Sebastian Castellanos as he arrives at a gruesome mass murder scene. Sebastian has to face his fears in order to survive. Read More
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The Evil Within (2017 film)

This article is about the 2017 horror film. For other uses, see The Evil Within (disambiguation).

2017 American film

The Evil Within is a 2017 American horror film written and directed by Andrew Getty and starring Frederick Koehler, Michael Berryman, and Sean Patrick Flanery. It was originally entitled The Storyteller. The film's production was a personal project of Getty's, who largely self-financed at the estimated cost of $4–6 million. Production took fifteen years to complete. Following Getty's death in 2015, editing for the film was completed by producer Michael Luceri.

The film made its official premiere at the Fantasporto Film Festival on February 26, 2017; and was later acquired by Vision Films, who released the it via Video on Demand on April 4, 2017. It received mixed reviews from critics, who criticized the film's unevenness and dialogue while commending the it for its strangeness, and Getty's devotion to the material.

Plot[edit]

Dennis Peterson is a man with a mental disability who has had nightmares all his life since he was a child, including one where he entered a carnival ride that seemed underwhelming. He is told that "the ride isn't over." As an adult, Dennis has a dream where a living demon, called the Cadaver, fastens a zipper onto his back and enters his body. Also in his dream, he finds a hidden room in the cellar that holds a full-length mirror that Dennis believes the Cadaver came from. The very next day, his brother John presents him with an identical mirror as a gift. He begins speaking to his reflection, who seems to answer back to him.

Dennis' brother John has difficulty of his own. His girlfriend, Lydia, demands that they get married, but is upset that he will not do anything about Dennis. He is visited by Mildy Torres, a woman from social services, who believes that Dennis needs to be taken away. This upsets John as he feels that Dennis is his responsibility. Dennis continues to have nightmares of the Cadaver and his reflection informs him that in order to get rid of it, they need to start killing animals. He begins working in the secret cellar, which perplexes John, especially when he sees that Dennis has videos on taxidermy. Dennis says the videos are not his but were accidentally switched with another customer.

Once Dennis begins killing children, his reflection takes on a more competent demeanor and reveals that "he" was the one giving him the nightmares and that they still have more killing to do. Dennis meets with his crush Susan, an employee at his favorite ice cream place. He tries to ask her out, but the conversation gets awkward and Susan turns him down, hurting him. The Cadaver sends Dennis back to kill Susan. Before he can reach her, she runs out into the street and gets killed by a moving vehicle. When John and Lydia take Dennis to his favorite restaurant, he supposedly kills a man in the bathroom without hesitation, scaring himself. Dennis attempts to destroy the mirror, but his reflection pushes him in and takes on the "real" Dennis instead.

After a night out, John and Lydia discover that they do not recognize anyone at places they visit regularly, implying that Dennis has killed more people. Mildy Torres arrives at the house with two officers and are all killed by Dennis. While sitting at a favorite cafe, John reveals to Lydia his secret: Dennis was a child prodigy whose works had been published in the newspapers. One day while arguing, John punched Dennis and he fell down the stairs. When he awoke, his mentality diminished greatly and John has felt guilty ever since. Lydia sympathizes with John and accepts the idea that if she and John marry, Dennis will always live with them. She leaves to get Dennis, so they can share the happy news over dinner. John's friend Pete is sitting nearby and reveals that the taxidermy tapes are Dennis'. John instructs Pete to call the police, and he hails a taxi.

Lydia arrives at the house and is stabbed by Dennis, who proceeds to remove her insides. John arrives and enters the cellar, where he sits in a chair with a spotlight on it. Dennis appears with a now-stuffed Lydia and puts on a ventriloquist act and John realizes he is glued to the chair. The previous victims have all been stuffed and are used in an extravagant diorama revealing that John intentionally hit Dennis with a baseball bat while he was sleeping. Afterward, he used the fabrication of Dennis falling downstairs to cover his violent act. As more stuffed bodies are revealed, it becomes unclear if John or Dennis is seeing what is actually happening. Overwhelmed, John takes a gun and shoots himself. Dennis is slammed down by a Cadaver-Spider hybrid, only for it to be revealed that he is actually being restrained by police officers who drag him away.

The final scene shows Dennis in a padded room. It is revealed that the reflection Dennis is still in control while the real Dennis is trapped deep in his subconscious. All Dennis can do now is wait to have the dream where he can finally get off the carnival ride.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The Evil Within was inspired by the childhood nightmares of Getty. According to a post-production producer who had worked on the film and a friend of Getty, Ryan Readenour: "When he was young he would have these really powerful, sick, twisted dreams, and [they were] so shocking to him that he didn't think they came from him." Getty conceived the idea that it could be a storyteller who created these dreams, and The Storyteller was then used as the first title of the film.[2] In a supplementary interview on the DVD release, Getty also stated he was inspired by the David Berkowitz Son of Sam killings, in which Berkowitz said he was ordered to kill by a demon taking the form of a talking dog. Getty postulated, what if there really was a demon giving the serial killer orders.

Filming began in 2002, and the film was shot largely in Getty's own mansion. He also converted one of the rooms in his mansion into a post-production suite. He made his own unique camera rigs, built expensive sets, and with his FX team he created elaborate animatronic robots, including an octopus that can play a drum kit.[3] The production however would stop and start over many years as it was beset with funding issues and conflicts with the cast, including a lawsuit from a studio assistant.[2] The cast and crew also went through a number of changes, and according to Koehler, only he and Michael Berryman made it through to the changes.[4]

This was the final film to feature Matthew McGrory who appeared in an uncredited cameo from footage shot before his death in 2005.[5] The health conditions of both McGrory and Berryman (who had been ill for some years) had slowed down the production and scripted scenes had to be replaced.[6]

Getty continued to work on the film for many years after the filming, creating his own special effects and trying to perfect the film. He died in 2015 before the film was finished, with the coloring and editing not completed.[4] Producer Michael Luceri, who had also edited the film, finished the film.[7]

Release[edit]

The Evil Within made its official premiere at the Fantasporto Film Festival on February 26, 2017.[8] It was later screened at the Dead by Dawn Horror Film Festival on April 20 that same year.[9] Amsterdamned Film Festival on October 27.[10] That same day the film was alternately screened at the Morbido Film Festival as a part of its "New Blood" section.[11]

Home media[edit]

The film was later acquired by Vision Films and released on April 4, 2017 on VOD services in North America such as Amazon under a new title, The Evil Within.[12][13]

Critical reception[edit]

The Evil Within received mixed reviews from critics, with many critics noting the unevenness of the film. However, on Rotten Tomatoes, the film received a 100% approval rating based on five reviews.[14] Most noted that in spite of its flaws, the movie succeeds in more ways than not. David Fontana of Film Inquiry thought that the film is "riddled with strange and unfocused plot-lines" and "filled with cringeworthy character acting", and that it "becomes so wrapped up in its own eccentricities that it is all but impossible to follow coherently". He nevertheless praised the film for its surreal visuals and special effects, and thought the "nuanced details" of the film "help to raise The Evil Within above its flaws", and that "it's hard to argue with that much [of Getty's] devotion to this singularly distinguished work of art".[15] Charles Bramesco of The Guardian considered the film "very clearly the handiwork of a rank amateur under the influence of powerful narcotics", but that "Getty’s monomaniacal drive and technical knowhow resulted in some truly outré horror", and that his "wild experiments with the form command respect".[3] Travis Johnson of Filmink criticized the film's dialogue, and felt that there were "no discernible reasons for scenes and interactions to exists at all", but still judged it "one of most singularly strange films to come along in a good while" and that it is a "remarkable cinematic artifact that is absolutely worth experiencing".[16]

Andrew Todd from Birth.Movies.Death. gave the film a mostly positive review, stating that the film was 'far more elaborately crafted than one would expect'. Todd further noted that the film's perceived "faults" were actually its strengths, comparing the film to Marcin Wrona's final film Demon as "it's hard to watch without reading the director's psychological state and subsequent death into it."[17] Andrew Marshall from Starburst Magazine rated the film a score of 7/10, while noting the film's "dubious" sub-plots and occasionally stilted dialogue, Marshall stated, "The Evil Within will not be for everyone, and as the years pass it's likely that the story of its prolonged production and tortured creator will become better known than the film itself, but one thing you can say for sure is that Andrew Getty has left his mark upon the world."[18] Matt Boiselle from Dread Central awarded the film 3.5 out of 5 stars, writing, "Solid cast-work, a disquieting overall aura, and Matthew McGrory in one of his final on-screen appearances – it all adds up to a film that should be in your queue of midnight watches now."[19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Wells, Mitchell (November 16, 2016). ""The Evil Within," A Film By The Late Andrew Getty". Horror Society.
  2. ^ abcMiller, Michael (April 10, 2015). "Tragic Getty Heir Made a 'Twisted' Horror Movie (VIDEO)". People.
  3. ^ abBramesco, Charles (March 14, 2017). "A millionaire, his meth addiction and the horror movie 15 years in the making". The Guardian.
  4. ^ abRitman, Alex (March 6, 2017). "Late Getty Heir's Directorial Debut 'The Evil Within' Lands After 15 Years". Hollywood Reporter.
  5. ^Thakgore (June 28, 2017). "Review: "The Evil Within" (2017)". Horror Society.
  6. ^"15 years' worth of effort for a deep journey into a disturbed mind. The Evil Within – Movie Review". Horror World and Reviews. May 17, 2017.
  7. ^Fernandez, Alexia (March 14, 2017). "Inside the Dark Secrets of Tragic Oil Heir Andrew Getty — as His 'Macabre' Horror Movie Is Released After His Death". People. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  8. ^"The Evil Within will play at Fantasporto 2017". FilmFestivals.com. The Evil Within Blog. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  9. ^Horn, Stewart. "HORROR FILM FESTIVAL REVIEW: DEAD BY DAWN 2017". GingerNutsofHorror.com. Stewart Horn. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  10. ^"Amsterdamned film festival 2017". AmsterdamnedFilmFestival.nl (in Dutch). Amsterdamned Film Festival. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  11. ^"The Evil Within". Festival.Moidofest.com (in Spanish). Morbido Film Festival. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  12. ^Moore, Debi (February 20, 2017). "Vision Films Set to Unleash The Evil Within on VOD and DVD". Dread Central.
  13. ^"Vision Films reveal the Artwork and Trailer for Andrew Getty's The Evil Within at the American Film Market". Fan Carpet. 13 November 2016.
  14. ^"The Evil Within". Rotten Tomatoes.
  15. ^Fontana, David. "THE EVIL WITHIN: Andrew Getty's Bizarrely Original Passion Project Is A Sight To Behold". Film Inquiry.
  16. ^Johnson, Travis. "The Evil Within". Film Ink.
  17. ^Todd, Andrew. "THE EVIL WITHIN Review: A Meth-Addled Death Rattle". Birth.Movies.Death.com. Andrew Todd. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  18. ^Marshall, Andrew. "THE EVIL WITHIN (Dead By Dawn Horror Festival) - STARBURST Magazine". StarburstMagazine.com. Andrew Marshall. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  19. ^Boiselle, Matt. "Evil Within, The (2017) - Dread Central". Dread Central.com. Matt Boiselle. Retrieved 16 September 2019.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Evil_Within_(2017_film)

Evil within wikipedia the

The Evil Within

This article is about the video game. For other uses, see The Evil Within (disambiguation).

2014 video game

The Evil Within[a] is a third-personsurvival horror video game developed by Tango Gameworks and published by Bethesda Softworks. The game was directed by Resident Evil series creator Shinji Mikami and was released worldwide in October 2014 for PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Windows, Xbox 360, and Xbox One.[1]

The game centers on protagonist Sebastian Castellanos as he is pulled through a distorted world full of nightmarish locations and horrid creatures. Played in a third-person perspective, players battle disfigured nightmare-like enemies, including bosses, using guns and melee weapons, and progress through the levels, avoiding traps, using stealth, and finding collectables.

The Evil Within received a generally mixed reception upon release; praise was mostly directed at the game's horror elements and atmosphere, while criticism was directed at the game's story, characters and technical issues. A sequel, The Evil Within 2, was released on October 13, 2017.

Gameplay[edit]

The single-player story is arranged in chapters, which players complete in order to progress through the story. The game is played from a third-person perspective in which scavenging for supplies and learning when to fight or run are key factors in surviving the dangers of the game.[2] Such dangers include: bear traps, barbed wire traps, bombs, and spike traps; 'The Haunted', the game's most common enemy; 'Reborn Laura', a multi limbed, long haired, crawling creature; Ruvik, the game's main antagonist; 'The Keeper', a large humanoid with a safe as a head who wields a large meat tenderizer hammer; and 'Sadist', a large humanoid wearing a spiked metal mask on his face, wielding a chainsaw covered in blood.[3][4]

Sebastian Castellanos, the protagonist, needs to make use of the environment and things he may find in order to survive. The game world can transform during scripted events and as a result of player actions, altering locations and creating new paths or teleporting the player to new areas. Castellanos must use medical items to restore health; some of these items cause temporary hallucinogenic effects. By collecting vials of 'Green Gel' hidden throughout the game, players can upgrade Castellanos' abilities; more ammunition, extra stamina, and additional health are some of the upgrades.[5]

Players have a safe house called 'Safe Haven' that can be accessed during scripted events and by finding mirrors. The safe house is a mental hospital and has several accessible areas such as a save point, an upgrade room (where the player may upgrade Sebastian's skills), and the safe room where keys are used to open storage safes which contain useful items such as green gel and ammunition. These keys are collected by finding and breaking 'Madonna' statues hidden throughout the game's levels. There is a nurse called Tatiana who greets Sebastian when he teleports to the safe house.[6]

The player has access to various weapons such as a revolver, shotgun, sniper rifle, knife, grenades, and the 'Agony Crossbow', a projectile weapon that fires bolts capable of freezing, blinding, electrocuting, or exploding enemies. Ammunition for weapons is very scarce, but mechanical components can be harvested to craft additional bolts. One source of components, bombs, are traps that react to the player's proximity or movement. Bombs can be stuck to walls or the floor, in chests, and in vending machines. The bombs can be disarmed via a minigame.[5] Melee combat is designed only to create distance between the player and enemies, although the player can instantly kill some unaware enemies after sneaking behind them.[7] Enemies that are downed or incapacitated are capable of reviving; to avoid this, players may set fire to the downed enemy using a limited supply of matches to permanently defeat them.[5][7] Certain items in the environment, such as bottles, can be thrown to stun or distract enemies.[8]

There are seven different types of collectables in The Evil Within: 'Personal Documents'; Sebastian's personal log, detailing his life as a detective and his life with his wife and daughter. 'Documents'; the personal logs of other characters. 'Map Fragments'; pieces of the game's map; once collected, they are stored at the safe house. 'Newspapers'; newspapers detailing events concerning or involving Sebastian. 'Missing Persons Posters'; posters of characters Sebastian encounters throughout the game who have been reported missing. 'Audio Tapes'; tapes containing a recording that can be played which are recorded by characters through the game. Collectables can be found in levels themselves or in the safe house.[9][10]

The player unlocks several bonuses for completing the game. Extra weapons, character models and bios, 'AKUMU' difficulty (the game's hardest difficulty level), and New Game+ are some of the unlocks.[11]

Plot[edit]

Main Campaign[edit]

While investigating the scene of a mass murder at Beacon Mental Hospital, Krimson City Police Detective Sergeant Sebastian Castellanos, his partner Joseph Oda, and Junior Detective Juli Kidman find themselves suddenly thrown into an unreal world, after hearing a high-pitched noise. Shortly after this occurs, Sebastian is separated from his partners and is forced to flee from a monstrous man wielding a chainsaw. Upon reuniting with his colleagues, they attempt to escape via ambulance while Krimson City is destroyed by a massive earthquake, eventually causing them to crash. Freeing himself from the wreckage, Sebastian wanders through dark forests and abandoned buildings full of monstrous creatures, and witnesses the apparition of a disfigured man in a white hood. Sebastian soon encounters one of Beacon's doctors, Marcelo Jimenez, who is searching for his patient, Leslie Withers. Jimenez identifies the hooded stranger stalking them as Ruvik.

Sebastian eventually reunites with Joseph, though it is shortly revealed that Joseph is suffering from a strange form of transformation which compels him into a murderous rage. While he is able to control it for the most part, Joseph warns Sebastian to be wary of him if he turns. The two eventually find and rescue Kidman from drowning in a crude contraption, though they are soon separated again after hearing the high pitched noise.

Sebastian learns of the story of Ruvik, born Ruben Victoriano, through various memories that Ruvik places him in. Ruben was an intellectually gifted but mentally unstable child, and was close to his sister, Laura. While playing in a barn on their family's estate, Laura was killed and Ruben was severely burned after the barn was set on fire as an act of revenge against their parents. Due to his disfigurement from the fire, Ruben's father hid him in the basement of the family manor. Deeply traumatized over Laura's death, Ruben eventually killed both of his parents, took control of their fortune, and continued to "donate" money to Beacon Mental Hospital in exchange for test subjects for his experiments into the human psyche.

Ruvik began designing STEM as a means for him to reshape reality, so that he could physically travel back into his memories and live his life again with Laura. Jimenez then took notice of Ruvik's work, and revealed it to Mobius, who wished to use it for their own purposes. As a safety measure, Ruvik calibrated STEM to work with only his brain as the core. In retaliation, Mobius simply killed him and extracted his brain for installation in order to use the machine, thus allowing Ruvik to maintain control of the STEM world. Kidman realizes that Mobius in fact wants the meek Leslie as a replacement for Ruvik's brain - an easily manipulated 'blank slate' mind, which they can use to power STEM and create a world of their own design.

When Jimenez, aided by Sebastian, tries to use Leslie to return to reality, he realizes that Ruvik wants to transfer his mind to a compatible host, and escape into the real world. A beast created from Ruvik's subconscious kills Jimenez, and Ruvik scatters the group across his mind. Kidman finds Leslie first, and is about to shoot him to prevent Ruvik from using him as a host, when Sebastian and Joseph intervene, prompting her to shoot Joseph, before Ruvik separates them again.

Sebastian finds Leslie, and guides him back to the hospital. At the top of the lighthouse, he sees his own body in a bathtub hooked to the STEM machine. Kidman arrives and attempts to convince Sebastian that Leslie has to die. Ruvik interrupts them, gets hold of Leslie, and absorbs him.

Sebastian battles a gigantic creature created from Ruvik's subconscious and defeats it, waking up in the bathtub. He pulls himself off the machine, removes Ruvik's brain from the STEM, and crushes it. He wakes up in the tub again with Kidman by his side, monitoring him. Kidman motions for Sebastian to stay quiet. Sebastian falls unconscious, and later wakes up in the same tub, with no one around except for the bodies of Jimenez and Connelly. As police and S.W.A.T. reinforcements arrive, Sebastian exits the hospital and notices Leslie walking out of the main gates.

The Assignment and The Consequence[edit]

Entering the machine, Kidman is attacked by Oscar Connelly (Kiff VandenHeuvel) while in the forest and falls off a cliff. She then hears Mobius talking to her, and attempts to use a keypad. Blocked out by the keypad, she is forced to find a way to get access, avoiding several creatures along the way. After being trapped by Ruvik and subsequently rescued by Sebastian and Joseph, she is separated from the former, while the latter turns into a Haunted and attacks Kidman. After she defeats him, the world changes and after getting past several obstacles, she finds Leslie and takes him to the church, only to be confronted by Ruvik who attacks Kidman through Leslie. She then learns that Ruvik can leave STEM through Leslie by overriding himself into Leslie's body, and he informs Kidman that Mobius has been keeping tabs on her as much as he once was. Kidman then tries to shoot Leslie, only for both to disappear, and a figure known as the Administrator (Rob Brownstein) begins talking to Kidman, demanding her to extract Leslie instead of killing him regardless, but Kidman refuses to complete the mission, warning him that they don't know what Ruvik is capable of. He then appears in front of her as a dark misty figure and pursues her until Kidman finally manages to escape him. Outside the church, she sees Beacon Mental Hospital in the distance, before its lighthouse blinds her.

Waking up in the Safe Haven and meeting Tatiana Gutierrez (Julie Granata), Kidman explores the area before being able to leave. Ending up back at the Mobius headquarters, she decides to go the bottom floor to the STEM terminal because she thinks Leslie is heading there. Along the way she learns more about Ruvik's relationship with Mobius and the way they treated him. Reaching at the terminal, she's led back to Krimson City and goes through the police department, where she sees memories of Sebastian and Joseph and begins feeling sympathy for the former. Heading back towards Beacon Mental Hospital, she meets up with Sebastian who gets turned into a Haunted by Ruvik, but manages to save him and find Leslie. However, The Administrator chases her until she gets to a school bus and drives away, but Ruvik then telepathically launches the bus into the hotel. Kidman recovers and is separated from Sebastian and Joseph, losing her handgun in the process. Along the way, she encounters paintings of Ruvik that are trying to take control of Leslie. Kidman manages to save Leslie but he runs out of fear. Proceeding further, she finds more paintings trying to take control of Leslie. While trying to fend them off, hands of Laura burst from the ground and ensnare Kidman, and Leslie points a gun towards her, but he manages to resist Ruvik's control and shoots the painting, saving Kidman. Retrieving the handgun from Leslie, Kidman takes him along, hoping that this way he will be safe. Following this, a scene from the main game plays, but from Kidman's perspective, as she sees the Administrator instead of Sebastian, who informs that they know what Leslie will become and that Ruvik is a corpse. After Leslie's outburst, she pursues Leslie, but is brought back to Mobius HQ.

Then, she goes through a door and is brought to Beacon, where she accesses other rooms and learns about Leslie's synchronization with Ruvik's brainwave due to his loss of family, and her being an expendable agent that could potentially neutralize Ruvik. Rushing through dozens of Haunted, Kidman is able to get in an elevator that leads up to the apex of Beacon where the Mobius facility is, as the Administrator taunts Kidman, explaining that STEM was built on the premise of fear as a way to control individuals, with the true purpose of her mission serving as a test run for the Administrator's new method of infused control. Having finally broken out of his influence, she eventually faces the Administrator, who makes a final attempt to end Kidman but is defeated, who then remarks how he'll always be a part of Kidman before being shot.

Awakening in the real world, Kidman sees Leslie emerge from a STEM terminal and being taken away along with Joseph, as well as the vessel that housed Ruvik's brain now empty, much to her confusion. A woman then calls out to Kidman from behind, who is revealed as Myra (Tasia Valenza), Sebastian's wife. Myra says "he" will need a debriefing as soon as Kidman gets back. With no one watching her, Kidman frees Sebastian, and tells the Mobius members to leave Sebastian, Connelly, and Jimenez there, as they were not going anywhere. The Administrator's voice is heard as says that "No one is".

Development[edit]

The Evil Within began development in late 2010 under the codename "Project Zwei".[12]Resident Evil creator Shinji Mikami served as the game's director, with development taking place at his studio Tango Gameworks.[5][13][14] The studio was bought by ZeniMax Media in 2010, shortly after development began.[14] Mikami said that he wanted to make a survival horror game as he believed that contemporary horror games relied more on action than survival.[15]

The game was announced in April 2013.[16] Believing that the tropes of the survival horror had become predictable over time, the design deliberately attempts to make the player feel powerless by taking place in confined spaces, limiting ammunition, and presenting near-invincible enemies that promote running and hiding over engaging in combat.[17] Art director Naoki Katakai said that the design concept of enemies, such as those wrapped in barbed wire or filled with glass shards, is that they are victims suffering under a greater evil. The asylum itself was inspired by the Winchester Mystery House, a Californian mansion famous for its architectural curiosities.[8]The Evil Within is built on the id Tech 5 modified by Tango Gameworks with a new dynamic renderer enabling dynamic lighting to the game.[5][18] Tessellation is also added. On April 15, 2013, and over the next few days, Bethesda Softworks revealed a series of short cryptic videos teasing the new game,[19] officially announcing it on April 19, 2013, revealing the title, the platforms it will be released on, and a live-action teaser trailer.[18] A second trailer was released on September 17, 2013[20] and an extended gameplay video was revealed on September 27, 2013.[21] Bethesda announced that the game had gone gold on September 25, 2014.[22]

Release[edit]

The Evil Within was released in October 2014.[23][24] In Japan, the game was released as Psycho Break.[16] The Japanese version had to remove gore-related content to receive a D-content rating (allowing its sale to customers 17 years of age or older) to avoid limiting its potential audience; this content can be restored via optional DLC.[25]

Warner Bros. Movie World in Queensland, Australia, created a maze populated with real-life characters from the game as part of its annual Fright Nights event to promote the game.[26] Prior to the game's release, Titan Comics released a four-part mini series set before the events of the main game[27]The Art of the Evil Within, a book collecting concept art and behind-the-scenes material from the game, was released by Dark Horse Comics alongside the game on October 14, 2014.[28]

The game also features downloadable content (DLC) missions which feature Juli Kidman and the enemy, the Keeper, as playable characters. A story-based campaign following Kidman was released as two separate DLC packs, which introduced new enemies, locations, and focus on unsolved mysteries from the main game.[29] The first of the two DLCs, titled The Assignment was released on all platforms in March 2015 worldwide, while The Consequence followed later in April 2015.[30][31] The final DLC content, The Executioner, follows the character called The Keeper through a series of mission-based levels with sadistic objectives. The content allows players to play in a first-person perspective and was released on May 25, 2015.[32]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Reception

The Evil Within received generally positive reviews from critics upon release. Aggregating review website Metacritic gave the Xbox One version 79/100 based on 24 reviews,[35] the PlayStation 4 version 75/100 based on 65 reviews[34] and the Windows version 68/100 based on 18 reviews.[33]

Computer and Video Games (CVG) described it as "the game Resident Evil 5 should have been", although they were critical of some technical issues.[36]VideoGamer.com liked the gunplay and horror, but disliked the story and its pacing, stating: "The Evil Within has enough magic to make it a worthy investment."[51]Destructoid said: "[The game] will definitely scratch the itch of someone who has been pining for a return to the older days of gaming, but everyone else who has come to expect that certain layer of polish likely won't be amused."[37]Polygon's Philip Kollar summed up his thoughts by saying: "The Evil Within has great moments where the excellent combat and creepy environmental design come together. But those moments are fleeting, inevitably sapped of their delightful terror by design choices that feel trapped in the glory days of a decade ago."[50]

GamesRadar's Ashley Reed gave the game a 3.5/5, commending the game for providing innovation and a story that keeps the player involved. Even though she mostly liked the game, Reed had several criticisms, stating: "The Evil Within stumbles in a few too many places to be Mikami's magnum opus. It artificially forces players into punishing combat scenarios more times than can be ignored, and plots and themes with great promise end up sputtering out in disheartening fashion. Still, it would be wrong to dismiss all the things it does right. Between a gorefest that's thoroughly engrossing, amazing feelings of triumph created by the imposing difficulty, and a plot that gets to the core of some very unsettling themes, The Evil Within brings enough to the table that it deserves a taste."[42]

Lucy O'Brien of IGN gave it a positive score of 8.7 out of 10 in her review of the game. She praised the gameplay and horror of the game, but criticized the boring protagonist, Sebastian, and the saggy and convoluted plot, stating that "while its story does end up buckling under its own ambition, there is little here that takes away from the joy of experiencing survival horror under the steady hands of a master of the craft."[46]

Christopher Livingston from PC Gamer gave it a mixed review, praising the survival portions of the game, tense and often exciting atmosphere, satisfying stealth, exciting action sequences, as well as the nicely detailed environment, but criticizing the recycled, and very often, not scary bosses, poor character models, late texture pop-ins, sluggish control, frustrating camera angles, limited video options and poor decision on the aspect ratio. He stated that all these technical issues has dragged The Evil Within from enjoyably challenging to needlessly frustrating.[49]

Tim Turi from Game Informer praised its high replay value, jump scares, well-executed lighting, dark, unpredictable world, as well as the sounds of enemies, but criticizing the distracting texture pop-in and disappointing story. He summarized the game as "an unnerving experience that keep your palms sweaty while delivering a harrowingly rewarding gameplay trial."[40]

Shaun McInnis of GameSpot spoke well of its striking atmosphere, tense combat that encourages resourcefulness, and rewarding skill progression system, but criticizing the nonsensical story and forgettable characters, autosave system, and a few frustrating boss fights.[41]

As the aspect ratio of the game received criticism, a patch was released on June 23, 2015 that allows players to play the game in full screen.[52]

Sales[edit]

In Japan, the game sold 176,691 physical copies across all platforms,[53] along with an estimated 4,138 digital copies.[54]The Evil Within was the second best-selling game in the United Kingdom on the all-formats chart during the week of its release.[55] In the United States, the game was the third best-selling game of October 2014. It set the record for the highest-selling first month of sales for a new survival horror intellectual property (IP),[56] until the record was later broken by Dying Light, when it released in January 2015.[57]

Sequel[edit]

At E3 2017, Bethesda revealed the trailer for a sequel, The Evil Within 2. The game takes place three years after the events of the original game and features Sebastian returning to STEM to look for Lily, his believed-to-be dead daughter. The game was released on October 13, 2017 for PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. The Last Chance Pack was announced as a pre-order bonus on July 19, 2017; it includes an exclusive handgun, some crafting items and some healing items. It is similar to The Fighting Chance Pack from the first game.[58]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Crossley, Rob (September 4, 2014). "The Evil Within UK Release Date Moved Forward". GameSpot. Retrieved September 4, 2014.
  2. ^O'Brien, Lucy. (April 22, 2013). "The Evil Within -- First Look". IGN. Retrieved July 1, 2015.
  3. ^All Monsters In The Evil Within – ULTIMATE ENEMIES GUIDE! (July 24, 2014).
  4. ^Reed, Ashleyon. (October 15, 2014). "Every horrible monster you’ll meet in The Evil Within". Games Radar. Retrieved July 1, 2015.
  5. ^ abcdeMcWhertor, Michael (2014). "The Evil Within mixes survival horror with psychological terror, then steeps it in gore". Polygon. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  6. ^"The Evil Within guide: walkthrough and tips for survival". (October 15, 2014). VG247. Retrieved May 20, 2015.
  7. ^ abWhitehead, Dan (May 27, 2014). "The familiar fear of The Evil Within". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  8. ^ abO'Brien, Lucy (April 22, 2013). "The Evil Within – First Look". IGN. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  9. ^Collectables
  10. ^Arif, Shabana. "The Evil Within collectibles locations guide". Games Radar. Retrieved July 1, 2015.
  11. ^The Evil Within Cheats For PC Retrieved April 1, 2015.
  12. ^Purchese, Robert (April 27, 2012). "Resi creator "extremely confident" about new game Zwei's graphics". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  13. ^Gilbert, Ben (April 25, 2012). "Resident Evil's Mikami welcomes Bethesda to the world of survival horror". Joystiq. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  14. ^ abYin-Poole, Wesley (April 25, 2012). "Resident Evil creator's new game is a survival horror codenamed Zwei". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  15. ^Phillips, Tom (April 22, 2013). "Resident Evil creator Mikami: "There aren't any real survival horror games in the world right now"". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  16. ^ abPhillips, Tom (April 19, 2013). "Shinji Mikami's The Evil Within announced for cross-gen, 2014 release". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  17. ^"Father of survival horror Shinji Mikami promises fresh terror with The Evil Within". Edge. Future plc. December 5, 2013. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  18. ^ abGoldfarb, Andrew (April 19, 2013). "Shinji Mikami's New Game is The Evil Within". IGN. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  19. ^Wylde, Tyler (April 16, 2013). "Bethesda tweets cryptic Vine video, says "guess again" to Fallout 4 rumors". PC Gamer. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  20. ^The Evil Within – TGS Trailer
  21. ^The Evil Within – Extended Gameplay Video
  22. ^"The Evil Within Goes Gold Ahead of October Launch". Gamespot. September 25, 2014. Retrieved September 26, 2014.
  23. ^Nakamura, Toshi (April 25, 2013). "The Evil Within Will Be More About Using Your Brain Than Your Gun". Kotaku. Retrieved April 25, 2013.
  24. ^Lien, Tracey (May 28, 2013). "The Evil Within's first 15 minutes sets a spooky and suspenseful tone". Polygon. Retrieved September 13, 2013.
  25. ^Phillips, Tom (July 8, 2014). "Japanese gamers must download DLC to get The Evil Within's uncensored version". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  26. ^"The Evil Within Becomes a Real Horror Story thanks to Warner Bros. Movie World". AusGamers. September 4, 2014. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  27. ^Makuch, Eddie (May 1, 2014). "Bethesda's The Evil Within getting a prequel comic". GameSpot. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  28. ^Schedeen, Jesse (August 20, 2014). "Exclusive: The Art Of The Evil Within Hc Preview". IGN. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  29. ^Ray Corriea, Alexa (August 13, 2014). "The Evil Within's season pass will let you play as one of its bloodiest enemies". Polygon. Archived from the original on September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2014.
  30. ^Makuch, Eddie (March 24, 2015). "Evil Within's Next DLC Dated, Watch a Creepy Teaser Trailer Now". GameSpot. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  31. ^Tom Phillips (February 25, 2015). "The Evil Within: The Assignment DLC release date". Eurogamer. Retrieved February 25, 2015.
  32. ^Hussain, Tamoor (May 12, 2015). "The Evil Within's Final DLC Dated, Watch a Gruesome First-Person Teaser". GameSpot. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  33. ^ ab"The Evil Within for PC Reviews". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Retrieved October 14, 2014.
  34. ^ ab"The Evil Within for PlayStation 4 Reviews". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Retrieved October 14, 2014.
  35. ^ ab"The Evil Within for Xbox One Reviews". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Retrieved October 14, 2014.
  36. ^ abMatthew Elliot (October 14, 2014). "Review: The Evil Within is the game Resident Evil 5 should have been". CVG. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  37. ^ abChris Carter (October 15, 2014). "Review: The Evil Within". Destructoid. Retrieved October 18, 2014.
  38. ^Sebastian Thor (October 14, 2014). "The Evil Within – Test". Eurogamer. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  39. ^Sal Romano (October 14, 2014). "Famitsu Review Scores: Issue 1350". Gematsu. Retrieved October 1, 2016.
  40. ^ abTim Turi (October 14, 2014). "The Evil Within review: A Masterwork Of Absolute Insanity". Game Informer. Retrieved October 14, 2014.
  41. ^ abShaun McInnis (October 21, 2014). "The Evil Within review". GameSpot. Retrieved October 28, 2014.
  42. ^ abAshley Reed (October 15, 2014). "The Evil Within review". GamesRadar. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  43. ^Michael Huber (October 14, 2014). "The Evil Within review". GameTrailers. Retrieved October 14, 2014.
  44. ^Patrick Klepek (October 29, 2014). "The Evil Within Review". Giant Bomb. Retrieved May 27, 2015.
  45. ^Hannley, Steve (October 13, 2014). "Review: The Evil Within". Hardcore Gamer. Hardcore Gamer. Retrieved October 19, 2014.
  46. ^ abLucy O'Brian (October 14, 2014). "The Evil Within review: The Horror survives". IGN. Retrieved October 14, 2014.
  47. ^Susan Arendt (October 14, 2014). "The Evil Within review: Keep out". Joystiq. Retrieved October 14, 2014.
  48. ^Matthew Castle (October 14, 2014). "The Evil Within Xbox One". Official Xbox Magazine. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  49. ^ abChristopher Livingston (October 17, 2014). "The Evil Within Review". PC Gamer. Archived from the original on October 21, 2014. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  50. ^ abPhilip Kollar (October 14, 2014). "The Evil Within review: Head Games". Polygon. Retrieved October 14, 2014.
  51. ^ abSteven Burns (October 12, 2014). "The Evil Within Review". VideoGamer.com. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  52. ^Pereira, Chris (June 23, 2015). "At Long Last, You Can Play The Evil Within in Fullscreen". GameSpot. Retrieved June 24, 2015.
  53. ^"Game Search". Game Data Library (Famitsu sales data). Retrieved September 24, 2020.
  54. ^"Digital Estimates". Game Data Library (Famitsu sales data). Retrieved September 24, 2020.
  55. ^Tom Phillips (October 20, 2014). "FIFA 15 holds off The Evil Within, Borderlands in UK chart". Eurogamer. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  56. ^Rachel Weber (November 13, 2014). "NPD: NBA 2K15 is #1, hardware and accessory sales up". GamesIndustry.biz. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  57. ^Jeffrey Matulef (February 12, 2015). "Dying Light tops US retail sales for January". Eurogamer. Retrieved February 13, 2015.
  58. ^Frank, Allegra (June 12, 2017). "The Evil Within 2 launches this October". Polygon. Vox Media. Retrieved June 14, 2017.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Evil_Within

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