Filtertron dimensions

Filtertron dimensions DEFAULT

How to set up Filter&#;Tron pickups

Unlike PAF-style humbuckers, not all Filter’Trons are created equal and dimensions and mounts vary. Before buying retrofit Filter’Tron pickups, you should check the heights, footprint and mounting method required with the manufacturer and measure your guitar accordingly.

The arrival of Filter’Trons coincided with Gretsch abandoning a conventional tone control and introducing a tone switch. Given its poorly chosen capacitor values, most vintage Gretsch players keep the tone switch in the bypass position.

Consequently, the inherent treble bleed of regular tone controls doesn’t apply. Many modern Gretsch guitars have tone switches with better caps or a no-load tone control. You’ll need one or the other if you want authentic vintage Gretsch tone.

Controls for Gretsch guitars equipped with two Filter’Trons generally included individual volumes, as well as a master volume. The pots are k units but the way they’re wired means the amplifier ‘sees’ k.

Filter'Tron

Filter’Trons are naturally bright and, with a single k volume control, they can sound too shrill. If you’re installing Filter’Trons in a Les Paul or a Cabronita Tele, combine them with no-load tone pots and k volume pots for the full Filter’Tron experience.

How high?

Filter’Trons are extremely sensitive to height settings. TV Jones recommends 5/32 inches (4mm) between the top of the cover and the bottom of the E strings on the bridge pickup. For the neck, it’s between 3/16 inches (mm) and 7/32 inches (mm) on the bass side of the neck and 3/16 inches (mm) on the treble side.

Regard this as a starting point; much depends on string gauge and your own preferences. As a rule, things get louder and brighter as coils move closer to the strings and sound warmer and mellower as they get further away. Go too far, however, and the tone can be harsh or dull at the extremes.

Sun Bear Filter'Tron

Setting height with suspended Filter’Trons is easy but traditionally mounted Filter’Trons are screwed onto the top and sit inside routed recesses. TV Jones supplies foam spacers that allow a bit of movement. Alternatively, try wood shims under the ends of the pickups. You could start with foam to determine the optimum height before calculating the thickness required for the wood shims.

If it looks like the bridge pickup will need excessive shimming, try placing a thin rectangle of plastic or wood veneer between the bottom of the magnet and the base plate. That’s how Gretsch did things, but you can only do it on Filter’Trons with loose covers.

Before height setting, tighten the 24 pole screws all the way down, then undo each by half a turn. This allows for some upwards and downwards movement. Again, TV Jones provides guidance on screw-height settings but results will vary depending on string gauge and bridge radius.

Gretsch High Sensitive Filter'Tron

Set a neutral clean amp tone, select the bridge pickup, form an A major barre chord at the 5th fret and pick through the strings as evenly as possible. Determine which strings sound balanced and which are comparatively loud or quiet. To increase the volume of an individual string, raise its corresponding pair of pole screws, and to reduce output, lower the screws.

Take your time, use your ears and be aware that the strings and pole screws don’t always line up. Vintage style Filter’Trons had inch screw spacing in the bridge and neck. Consequently, the screw heights may look a little wonky once you’ve dialled in a balanced response.

Gretsch Vinage Filter'Tron

Here, the only sets with vintage spacing are the High Sensitives, Ray Butts Ful-Fidelities and Mojotrons. All the others have two-inch bridge spacing, with the Sparkle’Trons measuring and inches.

Setting pole-screw height is the key to achieving the balanced growl that makes Filter’Trons so special and unique. Repeat the procedure for the neck pickup and, once you can switch between the two pickups with a consistent level and even string-to-string balance, the in-between setting will sound fantastic.

Don’t know which Filter’Trons to buy? Check out our shootout of the best models here. For more guides, click here.

Sours: https://guitar.com/guides/diy-workshop/how-to-set-up-filtertron-pickups/

Few pickups have seen the kind of resurgence that the Filter’Tron has experienced recently. In the past, the Filter’Tron was championed only by staunch Gretsch devotees. But today, many guitar and pickup manufacturers are utilizing the Filter’Tron’s unique sound and look more often.

When Fender took over operations at Gretsch in , the beloved pickup made its way out of traditional hollow-bodied guitars and into all manner of Telecasters (such as the popular Cabronita models), Stratocasters, boutique builds, and brand new Gretsch models.

Pickup maker TV Jones brought new life to the pickup and, soon after, Seymour Duncan and Lollar were producing their own flavors of the classic Gretsch sound as well.

History

According to Chet Atkins’s autobiography, Chet Atkins: Me and My Guitars, it was his friend and inventor Ray Butts who devised the Filter’Tron to combat the 60 cycle hum inherent in early single coil pickups.

Gretsch was utilizing DeArmond pickups at the time. Chet was constantly battling the hum as his popularity and volume increased. Butts wired two coils out of phase, creating what could be considered the first humbucker.

Gretsch s HiLo’Tron pickups

Gibson’s Seth Lover was working on a similar design at the same time and filed his patent first. However, the Gibson humbucker and its descendants have key differences from the Filter’Tron in both design and sound.

The s were an unpopular time in Gretsch history, with Baldwin obtaining ownership of the company from to The period is highlighted by a dramatic decrease in sales, unpopular designs, and an overall decline in quality.

During this period, the recipe of the Filter’Tron changed various times, too. Magnets changed to ceramic, and the covers and pole pieces also evolved. A number of pickups of differing quality also began replacing the Filter’Tron altogether, such as the Blacktop Filter’Tron, HiLo’Tron, Mega'Tron, Super'Tron, and other iterations bearing the 'Tron name.

When Fender took charge of Gretsch recently, many of the Filter’Tron specs attempted to return to the original ‘50s models, such as with the return to alnico magnets.

Gretsch Streamliner GT with Broad'Tron Pickups

Gretsch has also introduced the Broad'Tron on recent budget models. This pickup is much closer in sound and construction to a traditional humbucker.

TV Jones has been considered to make the most accurate recreations of Filter’Trons with Gretsch using his models in their own high-end instruments. Jones also makes updated versions, which help capture new sounds with the technology.

The uniqueness of the Filter’Tron compared to the PAF humbucker is rooted in the details. A Filter’tron is much narrower than a PAF, so the coils are closer together. The pole pieces are also 1/16” closer together than a traditional humbucker.

Early Gretsch pickups were also not soldered in place. The hook-up wire was simply clipped to the pickup. Filter’Trons also use a magnet that is nearly twice as large as a traditional PAF magnet. The bobbins are also taller than PAF bobbins, which contributes to brighter tone.

While fundamentally a humbucker, the Filter’Tron and the PAF humbucker are miles apart sonically.

Tone

The tone of the Filter’Tron is what has kept this unique beast around and successful for so long. It is hard to separate the sound from the “Great Gretsch Sound” where these pickups began. It is worth noting that these pickups were conceived and chiefly employed in fully hollow guitars usually equipped with a Bigsby.

Simply put, the Filter’Tron has the warm humbucking tone of a PAF and the brightness and clarity of a single coil. Many have tried to explain how this is achieved. The leading contending ideas are lower output, a narrower string window, and narrower coil construction. These will be discussed further when we dive into adjustment.

Brian Setzer's signature Gretsch with Filter’Tron Pickups

A wide array of players embrace the Filter’Tron’s signature sound, spanning from Jazz to New Wave. Players such as Chet Atkins, George Harrison, Brian Setzer, Malcolm Young, and Billy Duffy have extremely different tones and play in different genres but still are devoted to the same pickup.

Clean, the Filter’Tron has a beautiful jazz sound without the inherent muddiness that a PAF sometimes exhibits. When slightly overdriven, it is the sound of rockabilly. These pickups have a treble snarl that is just on the pleasant end of strident without becoming too harsh. These factors combine to make the Filter’Tron a great bridge between the Fender and Gibson sound, carving out its own signature sonic space.

Adjustment

Adjustment of a Filter’Tron is a bit more tricky than a traditional PAF-style humbucker, as there are 12 adjustable pole pieces in addition to the overall height adjustment screws. With Filter’Trons, less adjustment is considered more when dialing in your sound. The two key points are with addressing pickup adjustment are output and height.

Output

The pickup industry uses DC resistance (DCR) to represent the output or strength of a pickup. The higher the ohms of DCR, the stronger the pickup is considered. While this does not tell the complete story of the sound of the pickup, it is a useful reference point.

For example, a Seymour Duncan JB Humbucker has an DCR of 16k (fairly high) and Fender Stratocaster “Fat '50s” pickups have a DRC of about 6k (medium low). Filter’Trons typically have a DCR of 3k-5k, which seems very low.

However, due to the size of the magnet and the tall and narrow configuration of the coils, Filter’Trons are considered to be on the louder side of the pickup range. This lower output allows the pickups to keep the single coil clarity, while the construction allows for humbucker warmth.

Height

Filter’Tron master TV Jones actually recommends not adjusting the pole pieces on your Filter’Trons, as the large magnet is the source of the tone of the pickup. As the magnet is further away from the strings in a traditional humbucker (as a result of the taller bobbins), Filter’Trons sound best when very close to the strings. I find this especially true when using heavier strings, especially if you are using a wound G for classic rockabilly sounds.

TV Jones Recommended Height Adjustments

TV Jones recommends the neck pickups to be 3/16” from the strings and the bridge to be 5/32” from the strings. This is the top of the pickup, not the pole pieces. For my Gretsch Center Block model with set up with gauge strings, I have the bridge pickup set to ” from the strings and the neck at ” from the strings. I do raise the pole pieces under the wound strings a bit to add more clarity to the bass frequencies.

Filter’Trons are a great pickup to experiment with and are becoming easier to install, with companies like Lollar offering them in traditional humbucker casings. TV Jones also makes mounting rings that will fit traditional-sized models into any guitar. These aftermarket solutions have made Filter'Trons one of the easiest pickup swaps out there that will give you an entirely different palette to work with.

comments powered by Sours: https://reverb.com/news/a-guide-to-filtertron-pickups
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Pickup - Gretsch, FilterTron, nickel

Gretsch

Pictured: Bridge

Pictured: Bridge

Pictured: Neck

Pictured: Neck

Click to zoom in

Customer Images:

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Product Optionsare currently out of stock and will be placed on backorder.

"Gretsch Filter'Tron Electric Guitar Pickups Filter Out Hum, Neon Noises, Crackle and Electrical Disturbance!"

The Filter'Tron "Electronic Guitar Head" was introduced in at the summer NAMM show in Chicago. Filter'Tron pickups feature dual-coils and are designed to Filter out the electronic hum normally associated with single-coil pickups, while adding a warmer tone, and a significant increase in output and sustain.

PositionOur Part NumberUPC/EANFender Part Number
BridgeP-PUGRET1
NeckP-PUGRET2
Bottom Plate LengthNeck versionP-PUGRET2 in.
Bottom Plate WidthNeck versionP-PUGRET2 in.
Item Height in.
Item Length in.
Item Width in.
Mounting Hole Center to Center in.
Packaging Dimensions in. × in. × in.
Weight (Packaging) lbs.
P-PUGRET1 - Bridge versionItem Height in.
Item Length in.
Item Width in.
Mounting Hole Center to Center in.
P-PUGRET2 - Neck versionBottom Plate Length in.
Bottom Plate Width in.
Item Height in.
Item Length in.
Item Width in.
Mounting Hole Center to Center in.

Questions and Answers

Click each question to see its answers.

1 answers Are these a perfect drop in for a fender cabronita body? adjustments needed like foam pads or screws? anything included beside the pickup itself?

Asked by Anonymous on October 13th,

Matt H

October 13th,

Hi, Please examine the specs on this pickup: Outer Dimensions: " x " (depth = ") Mounting Centers: " You will receive just the pickup.

Answer this question

1 answers I see different numbers for the width of the pickup, on this page it says both " and " and I found a " on another website. It sounds silly, but I can make this work with " or less. Could you get an accurate width for me?

Asked by Anonymous on January 28th,

Matt H

February 1st,

These Filtertron pickups are " in length.

Answer this question

1 answers Do you sell a pickup ring to mount in place of a humbucker?

Asked by Anonymous on February 1st,

Matt H

February 1st,

Unfortunately, we do not sell any conversion pickup rings.

Answer this question

1 answers Do these include screws?

Asked by Anonymous on April 11th,

This listing is just for the pickup and no mounting hardware is included.

Answer this question

1 answers Will the filtertons fit in a gretsch gt

Asked by Anonymous on December 10th,

BradWbr

December 11th,

Staff Member
It appears that the Gretsch GT uses Blacktop pickups, which are larger in size than these FilterTrons. Modifications would need to be made to the guitar to properly install these in that specific guitar.

Answer this question

Have a question of your own? Ask us now!

Terms and Conditions

Sours: https://www.amplifiedparts.com/products/pickup-gretsch-filtertron-nickel
Fender Parallel Universe Tele Thinline Super DLX RW

Pickup - Gretsch, FilterTron, nickel

Gretsch

Pictured: Bridge

Pictured: Bridge

Pictured: Neck

Pictured: Neck

Click to zoom in

Customer Images:

No Images yet! Submit a product image below!

Product Optionsare currently out of stock and will be placed on backorder.

"Gretsch Filter'Tron Electric Guitar Pickups Filter Out Hum, Neon Noises, Crackle and Electrical Disturbance!"

The Filter'Tron "Electronic Guitar Head" was introduced in 1957 at the summer NAMM show in Chicago. Filter'Tron pickups feature dual-coils and are designed to Filter out the electronic hum normally associated with single-coil pickups, while adding a warmer tone, and a significant increase in output and sustain.

PositionOur Part NumberUPC/EANFender Part Number
BridgeP-PUGRET1717669242534 006-2876-100
NeckP-PUGRET2609722136372 006-2880-100
Bottom Plate LengthNeck versionP-PUGRET23.11 in.
Bottom Plate WidthNeck versionP-PUGRET21.26 in.
Item Height0.73 in.
Item Length2.79 in.
Item Width1.32 in.
Mounting Hole Center to Center2.50 in.
Packaging Dimensions3.1 in. × 1.5 in. × 1.1 in.
Weight (Packaging)0.29 lbs.
P-PUGRET1 - Bridge versionItem Height0.73 in.
Item Length2.79 in.
Item Width1.32 in.
Mounting Hole Center to Center2.50 in.
P-PUGRET2 - Neck versionBottom Plate Length3.11 in.
Bottom Plate Width1.26 in.
Item Height0.73 in.
Item Length2.79 in.
Item Width1.32 in.
Mounting Hole Center to Center2.50 in.

Questions and Answers

Click each question to see its answers.

1 answers Are these a perfect drop in for a fender cabronita body? adjustments needed like foam pads or screws? anything included beside the pickup itself?

Asked by Anonymous on October 13th, 2016.

Matt H

October 13th, 2016

Hi, Please examine the specs on this pickup: Outer Dimensions: 2.79" x 1.32" (depth = 0.73") Mounting Centers: 2.50" You will receive just the pickup.

Answer this question

1 answers I see different numbers for the width of the pickup, on this page it says both 2.79" and 2.75" and I found a 2.80" on another website. It sounds silly, but I can make this work with 2.77" or less. Could you get an accurate width for me?

Asked by Anonymous on January 28th, 2017.

Matt H

February 1st, 2017

These Filtertron pickups are 2.79" in length.

Answer this question

1 answers Do you sell a pickup ring to mount in place of a humbucker?

Asked by Anonymous on February 1st, 2017.

Matt H

February 1st, 2017

Unfortunately, we do not sell any conversion pickup rings.

Answer this question

1 answers Do these include screws?

Asked by Anonymous on April 11th, 2018.

This listing is just for the pickup and no mounting hardware is included.

Answer this question

1 answers Will the filtertons fit in a gretsch g5420t

Asked by Anonymous on December 10th, 2019.

BradWbr

December 11th, 2019

Staff Member
It appears that the Gretsch G5420T uses Blacktop pickups, which are larger in size than these FilterTrons. Modifications would need to be made to the guitar to properly install these in that specific guitar.

Answer this question

Have a question of your own? Ask us now!

Terms and Conditions

Sours: https://www.amplifiedparts.com/products/pickup-gretsch-filtertron-nickel

Dimensions filtertron

How to set up Filter’Tron pickups

Unlike PAF-style humbuckers, not all Filter’Trons are created equal and dimensions and mounts vary. Before buying retrofit Filter’Tron pickups, you should check the heights, footprint and mounting method required with the manufacturer and measure your guitar accordingly.

The arrival of Filter’Trons coincided with Gretsch abandoning a conventional tone control and introducing a tone switch. Given its poorly chosen capacitor values, most vintage Gretsch players keep the tone switch in the bypass position.

Consequently, the inherent treble bleed of regular tone controls doesn’t apply. Many modern Gretsch guitars have tone switches with better caps or a no-load tone control. You’ll need one or the other if you want authentic vintage Gretsch tone.

Controls for Gretsch guitars equipped with two Filter’Trons generally included individual volumes, as well as a master volume. The pots are 500k units but the way they’re wired means the amplifier ‘sees’ 250k.

Filter'Tron

Filter’Trons are naturally bright and, with a single 500k volume control, they can sound too shrill. If you’re installing Filter’Trons in a Les Paul or a Cabronita Tele, combine them with no-load tone pots and 250k volume pots for the full Filter’Tron experience.

How high?

Filter’Trons are extremely sensitive to height settings. TV Jones recommends 5/32 inches (4mm) between the top of the cover and the bottom of the E strings on the bridge pickup. For the neck, it’s between 3/16 inches (4.7mm) and 7/32 inches (5.55mm) on the bass side of the neck and 3/16 inches (4.7mm) on the treble side.

Regard this as a starting point; much depends on string gauge and your own preferences. As a rule, things get louder and brighter as coils move closer to the strings and sound warmer and mellower as they get further away. Go too far, however, and the tone can be harsh or dull at the extremes.

Sun Bear Filter'Tron

Setting height with suspended Filter’Trons is easy but traditionally mounted Filter’Trons are screwed onto the top and sit inside routed recesses. TV Jones supplies foam spacers that allow a bit of movement. Alternatively, try wood shims under the ends of the pickups. You could start with foam to determine the optimum height before calculating the thickness required for the wood shims.

If it looks like the bridge pickup will need excessive shimming, try placing a thin rectangle of plastic or wood veneer between the bottom of the magnet and the base plate. That’s how Gretsch did things, but you can only do it on Filter’Trons with loose covers.

Before height setting, tighten the 24 pole screws all the way down, then undo each by half a turn. This allows for some upwards and downwards movement. Again, TV Jones provides guidance on screw-height settings but results will vary depending on string gauge and bridge radius.

Gretsch High Sensitive Filter'Tron

Set a neutral clean amp tone, select the bridge pickup, form an A major barre chord at the 5th fret and pick through the strings as evenly as possible. Determine which strings sound balanced and which are comparatively loud or quiet. To increase the volume of an individual string, raise its corresponding pair of pole screws, and to reduce output, lower the screws.

Take your time, use your ears and be aware that the strings and pole screws don’t always line up. Vintage style Filter’Trons had 1.9-inch screw spacing in the bridge and neck. Consequently, the screw heights may look a little wonky once you’ve dialled in a balanced response.

Gretsch Vinage Filter'Tron

Here, the only sets with vintage spacing are the High Sensitives, Ray Butts Ful-Fidelities and Mojotrons. All the others have two-inch bridge spacing, with the Sparkle’Trons measuring 2.2 and 2.1 inches.

Setting pole-screw height is the key to achieving the balanced growl that makes Filter’Trons so special and unique. Repeat the procedure for the neck pickup and, once you can switch between the two pickups with a consistent level and even string-to-string balance, the in-between setting will sound fantastic.

Don’t know which Filter’Trons to buy? Check out our shootout of the best models here. For more guides, click here.

Sours: https://guitar.com/guides/diy-workshop/how-to-set-up-filtertron-pickups/
Filtertrons Vs Humbuckers What Is The Difference

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