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The best 80+ inch TVs bring you into the world of elite world home cinema – you get images close to the size of a projector screen, but in a form that's much simpler to set up, and that's easier to get the best possible picture quality from.

Among the best 80+ inch TVs, you'll find many of the best TVs in the world really showing off what they can do, including some of the best OLED TVs for the first time. If you have the budget, this is where the best 8K TVs really get to come into their own, because the extra resolution really gets a chance to shine at the biggest sizes.

There are lower-cost models that reach up to 85 inches too, but even then "lower-cost" is a relative term, because any TV of this size is going to require a proper financial investment. And not only that, but they'll need a major amount of space to fit them in, too – it's a huge increase from the best 65-inch TVs, and actually the difference from the best 75-inch TVs is more than you might expect.

Getting one of the best projectors is the most cost-effective alternative to a huge TV and actually enables you to go even bigger if needed (TVs become very rare and specialist above 85 inches), but TVs have certain advantages: they're more immediate, you don’t have to worry about the lifespan, and you can enjoy all the usual TV features such as broadcast tuners and smart platforms, and next-gen gaming friendly features. It's also easier to have a simple and effective sound system with a TV – either built-in speakers or one of the best soundbars.

More importantly, an 80+ inch HDR TV can deliver levels of peak brightness that projectors struggle to meet, allowing you to enjoy the full benefits of HDR. We've got a full TV vs projector guide here, if you want to know more about how the two technologies compete.

Best 80+ inch TV: Is this the right size for you?

Unsurprisingly an 80+ inch TV is really large, and while such a screen could fit in a normal living room, it will probably dominate the space to an undesirable degree, unless you have a huge open space.

A TV this big should really be installed in a dedicated room, where it can take centre stage and its size won’t be an issue. Wall mounting is probably the best approach, but make sure the wall is load bearing and the bracket robust. 

You can theoretically sit up to 18 feet away, but given the increased resolution available these days you can sit much closer, making the experience more immersive. 

You should also consider investing in a multi-channel audio system, so there’s a big soundstage to accompany those impressive visuals. At the very least, take a look at the best soundbars – some give you Dolby Atmos sound with rear speakers, which is an experience to match the scale of your set.

Best 80+ inch TV: What to look for

The 80+ inch TV market is dominated by high-end models, including (but not limited to) the best 8K TVs, since the larger screen size benefits most from the increased resolution. However there are still excellent 80+ inch 4K TVs available – we do recommend going 8K if you're able, though.

There are both OLED and QLED screens available (as well as other forms of LCD), though this size range tends to be dominated by LCD currently. Very few of the best OLED TVs actually reach this scale, though more models are appearing in 2021.

As with any screen size you should be looking for HDR support, Dolby Atmos, state-of-the-art smart platforms, and gaming features ready for next-gen consoles, if you're so inclined – there's more info on these in our guide to the best gaming TVs. 

The most essential thing, when dealing with panels this large, is to have high-tech image processing to ensure that all content looks awesome on the big screen – when the picture is this big, you will see any imperfections, especially when upscaling from HD or (shudder) standard definition to 4K or higher.

Best 80+ inch TV: the list

(Image credit: Samsung)

1. Samsung 85QN900A

The best 80+ inch TV, bringing masterful 8K and HDR images

Specifications

Screen size: 85 inches

Other sizes available: 65, 75 inches

HDR: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG

Reasons to buy

+Astounding dynamic range+Stunning 8K detail+HDMI 2.1 ready

Reasons to avoid

-OLED still does black levels slightly better-Elite price

When it comes to delivering spectacular images at a huge size, the Samsung QN900A is king. Its 8K resolution delivers phenomenal detail, while the next-gen Mini-LED panel is fantastically bright for HDR, but also delivers the best contrast we've seen from any Samsung TV so far.

The 8K screen uses AI upscaling to really make the most of all the pixels, and really does make 4K video look better than it would on a 4K TV of the same size. It's also capable of making even HD and SD video look solid on the giant screen, which is no mean feat.

It does this while also using its array of tiny LEDs to deliver incredible brightness for HDR realism, but it also features many more local dimming zones than any other model has, meaning that the precision with which it can show dark areas next to light areas is the best we've seen outside of OLED TVs.

Our full QN900A review said that it "raises the bar even higher, combining extreme brightness, colour and 8K sharpness with unprecedented levels of contrast and backlight control to produce the all-round most spectacular pictures I’ve seen on a TV that's remotely affordable."

It also has a bezel-free design that's spectacular to see, it offers excellent gaming features including HDMI 2.1, the smart TV platform is excellent, and it has speakers all around the edge, for positional audio.

(Image credit: LG)

2. LG OLED83C1

The best 80+ inch OLED TV

Specifications

Screen size: 83 inches

Other sizes available: 48, 55, 65, 77 inches

HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG

Reasons to buy

+Excellent 4K image quality+Rich OLED HDR+Great features

Reasons to avoid

-No HDR10+-Mediocre sound quality

The LG C1 is the first OLED TV to be available at this kind of size, though several more will arrive soon. This is likely to remain the most affordable of them, though, but still offer superb image quality, including all the advantages of OLED.

OLED TVs don't require a backlight to generate the light for images, unlike LCD models – instead each pixel creates its own light. This means that they can control their own brightness individually, so OLED TVs are famed for how they can show incredible nuance in dark scenes, and how bright highlights can be right next to pitch-black areas, with no bleed between them. This makes the a favourite among cinephiles, because the accuracy is fantastic, as our full LG C1 review attests.

The LG C1 makes the most of all of this, with LG's latest-gen processing making sure that details are sharp and colour is accurate, while there are no digital artefacts in upscaled images – essential at this size.

The downside of OLED is that it can't go very bright, so while HDR looks wonderful on it because of the infinite darkness it can achieve, it can appear washed out if there's lots of bright light in your room. In controlled environments, it doesn't matter so much.

On top of all this, you can add complete HDMI 2.1 support for gaming, and a really comprehensive and easy-to-use smart TV platform, plus Dolby Vision HDR support (which Samsung doesn't offer). The sound isn't very special, but you were planning to add separate speakers anyway, right?

(Image credit: Samsung)

3. Samsung 85AU7100

The cheapest 80+ inch OLED TV worth buying

Specifications

Screen size: 85 inches

Other sizes available: 43, 50, 55, 58, 65, 70, 75 inches

HDR: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG

Reasons to buy

+Incredibly low price for the size+Great design+Good colours and detail

Reasons to avoid

-No Dolby Vision-Not very bright-Weaker upscaling than pricier models

If you want this size of TV for the lowest price, this is the model to look to. This is Samsung entry-level 4K TV model, and it comes in pretty much any size that TVs come in, including this giant-sized one.

It's not QLED, so it doesn't include the dazzling brightness and extra-rich colours that those sets are known for, but when it comes to visual bang for buck, Samsung's entry-level TVs are pretty much unbeaten. HDR performance is appealing overall, contrast is pretty solid, and there's a good amount of detail with 4K sources.

The processing isn't as advanced as higher-end sets, and this means that you'll see the issues with its upscaling from lower-res visuals at this size, as well as imperfections in motion handling. But again, it does all this as well as anything at this price can be expected to – it's not bad at all, it's just pushing the limits of the budget.

If your focus is going big for the minimum price possible, look no further – you won't find better image quality for the money than this.

(Image credit: Samsung)

4. Samsung 85QN95A

The best 85-inch 4K LED TV

Specifications

Screen size: 85 inches

Other sizes available: 65, 75 inches

HDR: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG

Reasons to buy

+Astounding Mini-LED HDR performance+Excellent smart platform+Top-tier gaming features

Reasons to avoid

-No Dolby Vision or Atmos-Not 8K

This is Samsung's highest-end 4K TV of 2021, and though it gives up 8K levels of detail, you get plenty in exchange: it's much cheaper than a flagship 8K, naturally, but it also uses Samsung's next-gen 'Neo QLED' panel, which uses Mini-LEDs for its backlight. Why is that good? The LEDs are 40 times smaller than the lights used before, which means Samsung can pack in more of them, which a) enables huge levels of HDR brightness in a thinner panel; and b) means you have much finer control over local dimming of the backlight, so contrast is improved over previous models.

The result is simply incredible image quality, especially when it comes to the range colours and light levels that HDR offers. You get pretty much the least amount of blooming from light areas to dark that we've ever seen, which is obviously essential if you're using this as a home cinema screen, in a darkened room.

The latest version of Samsung's processing is up to the task of putting images on a huge screen, too – it handles the detail of native 4K as well as anything else on the market, and its upscaling from HD to 4K is simply brilliant, especially from a high-quality source such as a Blu-ray, though it's no slouch with streaming sources either.

Built-in audio quality is even impressive, with speakers around the edges of the screen providing more width and height to sound than most TVs can muster. It's no replacement for a proper sound system, but if you do want this as a standard living room TV, the audio is pretty good.

It's also one of the best TVs in the world for gaming, thanks to having four HDMI 2.1 ports, which means it's ready for the 4K 120Hz images and Variable Refresh Rate support of next-gen consoles. Samsung has also introduced a new 'Game Bar' interface, which helps you to get the lowest lag rates possible, and to see exactly what settings you're running.

Finally, the design is just astounding. It's so incredibly thin, and there's just a single cable from the panel itself, which leads to a separate One Connect box. This is where all your HDMIs etc go, and can be hidden in a TV unit or similar, with a tiny lead taking video and power to the screen itself. This means it looks fantastic and tidy no matter whether you wall mount it or keep it on its minimalist stand. Read our full Samsung QN95A review for more on why we rate this fantastic set so highly.

(Image credit: Sony)

5. Sony XH90/X900H

The best 80+ inch 4K TV balancing price and visual spectacle

Specifications

Screen size: 85 inches

Other sizes available: 55, 65, 75 inches

HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG

Reasons to buy

+Great, punchy HDR brightness+Strong detail and upscaling+HDMI 2.1 features

Reasons to avoid

-No HDR10+-Android TV is a bit in-your-face

If you want to dive into some big-screen action but don't have the budget for the top-end TVs here, Sony's mid-range KD-85XH9096 (UK)/XBR-85X900H (US) is an excellent balance of image quality and size. It offers arguably the best detail of TVs in its price range, which is crucial when you're going BIG. It makes the most of the sharpness of 4K video, and its upscaling of HD is really impressive. Importantly, it also handles motion really well – again, at big sizes, any judder when watching movies is especially jarring, and good smoothing on sports helps to stop it looking smeary when action is fast (again, something more noticeable at larger sizes).

You get a great helping of HDR dazzle here, too – it can't match the brightness of more expensive models, but again its among the best of its price range. Dolby Vision support really makes the most of its full colour and contrast range, and it's also the best TV in its class for punching up SDR content to look closer to HDR.

Add in some extra features, such as better audio than most TVs, and support for HDMI 2.1 features on two ports (including 4K 120Hz now, with VRR promised for an update), and you've got a TV that's designed to be the complete package.

The Android Smart TV software is comprehensive for streaming services, which is the most important thing, but isn't quite as slick or intuitive as the software on the Samsungs, but that's a minor gripe overall. Our full Sony XH90/X900H review goes deeper into why this such a great TV.

Sours: https://www.t3.com/us/features/best-80-inch-tv-and-bigger

Best 65-inch TVs 2021: the best big-screen 4K TVs you can buy

Best 65-inch TV Buying Guide: Welcome to What Hi-Fi?'s round-up of the best 65-inch TVs you can buy in 2021.

As broadcasters, streaming services and Blu-ray discs evolve and push out increasing numbers of pixels, having a screen that's large enough to showcase the quality of what you're watching really does matter. So it's really no surprise that 65-inch TVs have risen so much in popularity.

If you're concerned about the space needed for a larger screen you can rest assured it needn't dominate your space. HD and now 4K video means you can sit closer to your TV, while smaller bezels make modern 65-inch TVs significantly less massive than those that have gone before. They're getting ever thinner, lighter and easier to wall-mount, too. 

Below you'll find our pick of the best 65-inch TVs you can buy, including LCD, OLED and QLED models from the likes of LG, Samsung, Sony, Philips and Panasonic, and offering support for HDR video in various forms, as well as streaming from Amazon Prime, Netflix, Apple TV, Disney+, BBC iPlayer and loads more besides.

1. Philips 65OLED806

It’s all gain, no pain for Philips’ 2021 OLED TV

Specifications

Screen type: OLED

Resolution : 4K

Operating system: Android TV 10

HDR formats : HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision, HLG

HDMI: HDMI x4 (HDMI 2.1 x2)

[email protected], VRR, ALLM: Yes

ARC/eARC : eARC

Optical out: Yes

Dimentions (with stand): hwd 84 x 145 x 29 cm

Reasons to buy

+Exceptionally sharp and punchy+Full HDMI 2.1 feature set+Supports all HDR formats

Reasons to avoid

-Some odd default settings

The Philips 65OLED806 is an absolutely superb TV that performs even better than its Award-winning predecessor while throwing in the next-gen HDMI features that would have previously put off some customers.

Of the four HDMI ports on the 65OLED806, two are full-fat HDMI 2.1 48Gbps sockets that support [email protected], VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) in all of its current forms (G-Sync certification is in progress), and ALLM (Auto Low Latency Mode), making this a very well-specified gaming TV. The very low input lag of around 14ms certainly helps matters, too, as does the HGiG mode, which broadly results in more accurate tone mapping of HDR games.

On the HDR front, the OLED806 has pretty much the full house, with HDR10, HLG, HDR10+ and Dolby Vision all supported. HDR10+ Adaptive is on board, too, allowing the TV to adjust HDR10+ content to ambient lighting conditions automatically. While Dolby Vision IQ isn’t officially supported, Philips says the combination of standard Dolby Vision and its AI-powered light sensor effectively does the same thing.

It’s very well appointed for apps, too. Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Apple TV and Disney+ are all present in their complete 4K, Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos glory (Amazon features HDR10+ content as well); Google Play Movies & TV (soon to be simply ‘Google TV’) has 4K Dolby Vision content, too, while Rakuten is in 4K HDR10; you get BBC iPlayer, ITV Hub, All 4 and My5 courtesy of the Freeview Play platform; the integrated BT Sport app will be useful for many; Plex and VLC can handle playback of your own media files; and Spotify, Tidal, Amazon Music and BBC Sounds are all on board. The only real absence of note is Now, and that won’t be a deal-breaker for many.

To get the best out of the exceptionally sharp and punchy display on the Philips 65OLED806, you’ll need to tweak its default settings, but the effort is more than worth it. There’s not a better TV available at its price.

Read the full review: Philips 65OLED806

2. Sony XR-65X90J

This big LCD TV is superb for the money

Specifications

Screen type : LCD w/ direct LED backlight

Resolution : 4K

Operating system : Google TV

HDR formats : HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG HDMI x4 (HDMI 2.1 x2)

[email protected], VRR: Yes

VRR : No

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical out: Yes

Dimensions with stand (hwd): 91 x 145 x 33.83 cm

Reasons to buy

+Lovely, authentic colour balance+Superb motion handling+Solid feature set

Reasons to avoid

-Limited blacks and viewing angles-Fairly rough standard-def-Missing UK catch-up apps

If your budget can stretch to a 65-inch TV, but perhaps not a 65-inch OLED or flagship QLED then the Sony XR-65X90J (or near-identical XR-65X94J in the UK) could be just what you’re looking for thanks to its heady mix of fancy features, perfectly-pitched picture performance and a mid-range price tag.

Those features include two HDMI 2.1 sockets that support [email protected] (but not VRR... yet) and the new Google TV operating system. The picture is brilliantly natural, authentic and balanced, and the sound is clear and direct too.

There's plenty of content options thanks to the Google TV OS. Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Disney+ and Apple TV are here in all of their 4K, Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos glory; Plex and VLC make for easy playback of your stored content; and Spotify, Tidal, Amazon Music and Deezer give you plenty of options for music streaming. However, users in the UK should take note that native apps for Now, BT Sport and My5, but BBC iPlayer, ITV Hub and All 4 are all missing. 

While this mid-range, direct-backlit LCD TV can’t match its OLED stablemates for black depth, but the backlight is consistent, with none of the clouding or blotchiness that’s common of big TVs in this price range. The set may not go perfectly black, but it goes very bright and the colours are excellent with a cinematically warm and rich delivery as well as a subtlety of shading that’s extremely rare at this end of the market.

Read the full review: Sony XR-65X90J 

3. Sony XR-65A90J

Simply the best TV you can buy right now

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 55in, 83in)

Type: OLED

Backlight: not applicable

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: Google TV

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 144 x 4.1cm

Reasons to buy

+Outstanding picture quality+Superb motion handling+Impressive sound

Reasons to avoid

-No VRR (yet), buggy [email protected] UK catch-up apps-Expensive

While Sony’s OLEDs are highly regarded, it’s typically hard to justify buying one over a rival LG. Historically, the Sony has a more authentic picture and better sound but is also a step behind on features and usability – and at least a level or two more expensive.

But what if Sony could produce a TV with most of those previously missing features, a more satisfying user experience, and a unique high-quality movie streaming app, all while raising the picture and sound quality to even greater heights? That's exactly what the company's done with the A90J.

In performance terms, the Sony A90J is an absolute stunner. It takes OLED picture performance to new, thrilling levels while maintaining the authenticity for which Sony is justifiably renowned. It also sounds significantly better than all of the other TVs you might be considering. The new Google TV operating system means the user experience is better than that of any pre-2021 Sony TV, too, and the exclusive Bravia Core streaming service is a genuine value-added feature.

UK catch-up apps are currently missing but we don't expect that to remain the case for very long. Hardcore gamers might want to take a wait-and-see approach, though, as the set doesn't yet support VRR (an update has been promised but not dated) and we found the [email protected] support a little buggy. 

However, if movies and TV shows are your priority and you have a big budget, we haven’t tested a better television than the Sony A90J. It’s pricey, but it’s also a clear cut above the competition.

Read the full Sony XR-65A90J review

4. LG OLED65C1

The C1 isn’t much of a step-up from the CX, but it didn’t need to be – this is a superb TV at a competitive price

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 48in, 55in, 77in, 83in)

Type: OLED

Backlight: not applicable

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: webOS 6.0

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 4.7cm

Reasons to buy

+Superb all-round picture quality+Near-flawless feature set+Better remote and menu system

Reasons to avoid

-Marginal gains on last year’s CX-Unengaging audio

LG’s C-series model has been the go-to pick of its OLED range for several years. It has always been the most affordable model with the company’s best panel and picture processing wizardry. Spending more would get you a fancier design and potentially better sound, but the picture would be no different.

That’s not the case in 2021. LG has introduced a new, brighter and sharper ‘OLED Evo’ panel, and the C1 doesn’t have it.

With so much of the focus on the upgraded G1, it’s perhaps predictable that the C1 isn’t much of an improvement on its predecessor, but there wasn’t much that needed improving. The picture performance and feature set were already exemplary, and LG has slightly improved the former with its new Cinematic Movement motion processing and enhanced de-contouring feature (which reduces banding), and slightly improved the latter with a better menu system and a more complete app selection (all UK catch-up apps are present).

The G1's picture is undeniably better in terms of brightness, sharpness and detail, but we're not talking huge margins and most people will struggle to justify the extra £500 ($500), particularly when the niche design and weaker sound are taken into account.

Ultimately, in performance-per-pound terms, the C1 is the better buy. In fact, it's one of the most recommendable TVs available right now.

Read the full LG OLED65C1 review

5. Samsung QE65QN95A

Samsung’s first Neo QLED is a force to be reckoned with

Specifications

Screen size: 65in

Type: QLED

Backlight: Mini LED

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HLG, HDR10, HDR10+

Operating system: Tizen

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 2.6cm

Reasons to buy

+Superbly bright, punchy and sharp+Exhaustive feature set+Lovely design

Reasons to avoid

-Artificial boost to dark detail-Reticence with extreme contrast-Still no Dolby Vision

This year looks very much like the year of Mini LED. The technology, which sees the traditional LEDs of a TV backlight miniaturised to increase contrast, is a feature of the 2021 line-ups of most major TV brands, including LG and Philips.

Mini LED TVs sit below their OLED models for those brands, but for Samsung, Mini LED is its flagship technology (assuming you discount its eye-wateringly expensive new Micro LED sets).

The company has developed its own Mini LEDs, which it says are even smaller and more efficient than those of its rivals, and combined them with its existing Quantum Dot tech to create a range of premium TVs that it calls Neo QLEDs. The QE65QN95A is the first Neo QLED we've tested and Samsung's flagship 4K set for 2021.

In real-world performance terms, Mini LED might not quite be the revolution that Samsung is pitching it as, but it is still a substantial upgrade to an already excellent range of TVs. The overall contrast offered is staggering, and the QN95A combines near-OLED black levels with awesomely crisp white highlights and fabulously vibrant colours, all while retaining an effortless sense of naturalism.

Throw in the best, most app-packed operating system in the business, a delightfully slim design and a full set of next-gen HDMI sockets, and this is (a lack of Dolby Vision support aside) as complete a package as can be imagined.

It’s early days for 2021 TVs, but Samsung has thrown down the gauntlet in emphatic style, and it will be fascinating to see how its rivals respond.

Read the full Samsung QE65QN95A review

6. LG OLED65G1

LG’s new 'OLED Evo' TV is a stunner

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 55in, 77in)

Type: OLED

Backlight: not applicable

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: webOS 6.0

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 2cm

Reasons to buy

+Brighter, punchier and sharper+Beautiful when wall-mounted+Improved remote and app offering

Reasons to avoid

-No feet or stand in the box-Sound lacks excitement

For the last few years, the C-class model has been the sensible choice of each new LG OLED range. Until now, it has been the most affordable model with the latest panel and picture processing tech: go further up the range and you might get better sound and a fancier design, but you won’t get a better visual performance.

For 2021, though, LG has introduced a new ‘OLED Evo’ panel that promises increased brightness and sharpness, and to get the Evo panel you have to step up to the G1. That’s slightly disappointing because you also end up paying extra for a rather niche design (the G1 is designed to be wall-mounted, to the extent that there's no stand or feet in the box) that you may not want.

Still, if the design works for you and you don't mind forking out the extra £500, the G1 is undoubtedly the best OLED that LG has ever produced. It takes the picture performance of last year’s GX and CX and improves upon it in almost every way, particularly in terms of brightness, sharpness and detail. That makes it a seriously stunning picture performer. It's also packed with apps and next-gen HDMI features, including [email protected] on all four sockets.

Sound is less strong, but if you were always planning to combine your new TV with a separate sound system and the design works for you (and you've got deep pockets), the G1 should be seriously considered.

Read the full LG OLED65G1 review

7. Sony KD-65XH9005

One of the best performance-per-pound TVs you can buy.

Specifications

Screen size: 65in

Type: LCD

Backlight: Full array

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: Android TV 9

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 7cm

Reasons to buy

+Superb HDR+Colours pop+Excellent motion processing

Reasons to avoid

-Lightweight sound-Could be more PS5-ready

The 65XH9005 is one of the TVs that Sony is selling as "ready for PS5". That means it will have [email protected] (often referred to as HFR), VRR (Variable Refresh Rate) and ALLM (Auto Low Latency Mode). We say "will" because the set requires a firmware update, but Sony assures that it is expected to land in time for the PS5's launch.

With or without these console gaming features, this is an awesome TV. There are plenty of connections for hooking up partner kit, and you won't be wanting for onboard tech: this is a full-array LED-backlit TV with local dimming and supports the HDR10, HLG and Dolby Vision HDR standards, and Dolby Atmos for sound. It’s also Netflix Calibrated and IMAX Enhanced.

And the picture quality? Excellent. Sony’s X-Motion Clarity motion processing technology is reliably superb, making fast-moving pictures like games, sports and action films as smooth as butter. There are plenty of options to fiddle with, but leave it on auto, and you'll still be treated to a great experience visually. It's got good sound, too. A little lightweight compared to some, but it's clear, precise and well-projected. An ideal option for both gamers and non-gamers alike.

Read the full Sony KD-65XH9005 review

8. Philips 65OLED805

Philips strikes gold with this talented 4K TV.

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 55in)

Type: OLED

Backlight: not applicable

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision, HDR10+

Operating system: Android TV 9

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: ARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 88 x 145 x 5.8cm

Reasons to buy

+Crisp and detailed picture+Strong sound+Ambilight

Reasons to avoid

-Highlights could be brighter-Not the best choice for gamers

The 65OLED805 is a Philips OLED as it should be; genuinely excellent. If you’re prepared to forego the odd next-gen feature, it's the best performance-per-pound OLED you can currently buy.

It produces stunningly crisp and detailed pictures from all sources, delivers far more accomplished audio than most rivals, adds awesome Ambilight (which extends the onscreen action onto the wall around the TV in the form of coloured light) to the mix, and has a lower price tag than its LG, Sony, Panasonic and Samsung equivalents.

Gamers may be put off by the lack of next-gen HDMI features such as VRR (HDMI eARC is missing too), but for everyone else, the 65OLED805 represents an excellent purchase.

Read the full Philips 65OLED805 review

9. LG OLED65CX

The pick of LG’s current OLED TV range

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 48in, 55in and 77in)

Type: OLED

Backlight: not applicable

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Operating system: webOS

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 4.7cm

Reasons to buy

+Impressive picture performance+Full set of HDMI 2.1 features+Good operating system

Reasons to avoid

-Can be beaten for sharpness-Still missing some apps

No TV carries with it a greater sense of expectation than a C-class LG OLED.

For the last few years, this has been the most affordable model in LG’s OLED range that gets you the company’s best panel and processing tech – that’s a huge deal when you consider that LG is the progenitor of the current OLED TV revolution and the brand responsible for manufacturing the panel of every OLED TV you can currently buy, regardless of the badge on the bezel.

The C9 was a brilliant TV, and this CX improves upon it in several small but significant ways, such as increased dark detail, richer colours and better motion.

The Philips 65OLED805 offers an even sharper and punchier picture, plus Ambilight and HDR10+ as well as Dolby Vision, and all for a lower price – but the CX responds with a better operating system and a complete set of next-gen HDMI features.

Ultimately, which you go for will depend on what you’re looking for from your next TV (and where you live – the Philips isn’t available in the US or Australia), but the LG CX’s popularity is well deserved.

Read the full LG OLED65CX review

10. Samsung QE65Q80T

A great value 4K TV with a bold picture and impressive sound

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 49in, 55in, 75in, 85in)

Type: QLED

Backlight: direct LED

Resolution: 4K

HDR formats supported: HDR10, HLG, HDR10+

Operating system: Tizen

HDMI inputs: 4

ARC/eARC: eARC

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 5.4cm

Reasons to buy

+Excellent contrast and colours+Three-dimensional and detailed+Solid, spacious sound

Reasons to avoid

-Occasionally overcooks colours-Slightly exaggerates film grain

The Samsung QE65Q80T will be many people’s idea of a great value, high performing 4K TV. It has a big screen with a bold picture and superb HDR images; it delivers impressive sound and has just about every smart feature and app streaming service under the sun.

What’s more, the Tizen OS makes calibration and navigation easy, meaning this set is a good choice for those who want to tweak, as well as those who wish to do no more than take it out of the box, place it on the stand and switch it on.

The Q80T range’s popularity is well-founded, but before you get out the credit card, you should also consider the Award-winning Sony KD-65XH9005 above. For a little less money, you get a picture with a touch more maturity, just as much impact and even better motion processing. There isn’t a huge amount in it, though – both are killer TVs.

Read the full Samsung QE65Q80T review

11. LG OLED65GX

This beautifully designed ‘Gallery’ model is one of the highlights of LG's 2020 OLED range

Specifications

Screen size: 65in (also available in 55in, 75in)

Type: OLED

Backlight: Not applicable

Resolution: 4K

Operating system: webOS

HDR support: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

HDMI inputs: 4

USBs: 3

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 2cm

Reasons to buy

+Consistent, natural performance+Improved motion and dark detail+Lovely design

Reasons to avoid

-Currently lacks UK catch-up apps-No feet or pedestal in the box

While most people will opt for LG's C-class OLED, which is the most affordable set with all of the best picture processing, this GX takes that same picture and adds more powerful sound and a beautiful design.

This is LG's 'Gallery' model, and as such, is entirely intended for wall-mounting. You don't even get a stand in the box (although feet can be bought separately), with a low-profile mount provided instead. The set is a uniform 2cm deep, which is exceptionally slim. The CX, by comparison, is 4.7cm deep at its thickest point.

Picture-wise, LG has taken the exemplary performance of its 2019 OLEDs and improved it in a few key areas, with dark detail, colour richness and motion handling all getting a worthwhile boost. The set sounds decent, too, particularly for one with essentially invisible speakers.

The only issue for UK buyers is the current lack of catch-up apps such as BBC iPlayer, but LG assures us it's working on this. Either way, this is a stunning TV and currently the best 65-inch TV you can buy.

Read the full LG OLED65GX review

12. Samsung QE65Q95T

It's perhaps not the flagship TV we were expecting, but the Q95T is still a cracking set

Specifications

Type: QLED

Backlight: Direct LED

Resolution: 4K

Operating system: Tizen

HDR support: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG

HDMI inputs: 4

USBs: 2

Optical output: Yes

Dimensions (hwd, without stand): 83 x 145 x 3.5cm

Reasons to buy

+Rich, solid, natural picture+Very good motion+Improved sound

Reasons to avoid

-‘Predecessor’ was punchier

New for 2020, the Q95T isn't the successor to the Q90R that we were expecting it to be, but it is a brilliant TV in its own right and has launched at a lower price than did its 'predecessor'.

It has fewer dimming zones and goes less bright in real terms than the Q90R, but the Q95T is otherwise better in every meaningful way. It delivers a richer, more solid and more natural picture, much improved motion processing, and better sound.

The Tizen operating system is largely unchanged, and that's no bad thing. No other operating system has as much content or more quickly gets you to what you want to watch. All in all, definitely one of the best 65-inch TVs you can buy.

Read the full Samsung QE65Q95T review

13. LG OLED65B9PLA

LG’s affordable B9 OLED features 2018's tech in a 2019 panel.

Specifications

Type: OLED

Resolution: 4K

HDR support: HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG

HDMI inputs: 4

Dimensions (hwd, with stand): 87 x 145 x 25cm

Reasons to buy

+Brilliant colour+Good detail+Great price

Reasons to avoid

-Average dark/light production-Audio a touch muffled

The LG B9 is a mixture of the old and the new – it combines the company's 2018 processor with its 2019 OLED panel. This makes it the most affordable LG OLED you can currently buy and a tempting proposition indeed.

The picture is natural, colourful and well-measured for contrast whether you’re watching in 4K or upscaling from HD, and whatever processor power is missing certainly won't ruin your TV experience.

There are small discrepancies in light and dark detail that the top LG processor offers, and it’s worth paying the extra for them if you can. As far as this price proposition goes, though, the LG OLED65B9PLA gets our full vote of confidence.

Read the full LG OLED65B9PLA review

14. Sony KD-65AG9

A stunning OLED television and one of the best-sounding TVs we've tested.

Specifications

Type: OLED

Resolution: 4K

HDR support: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

HDMI inputs: 4

Dimensions (hwd, with stand): 84 x 145 x 25.5cm

Reasons to buy

+Solid, detailed, natural pictures+Great sound+Lovely styling

Reasons to avoid

-HDR lacks a little sparkle-Tricky to tweak-Visible processing

Sony's flagship Master Series OLED TV aims to get closer to the content creator's intention than ever before. And it does a mighty fine job of doing so. If the combination of brilliant motion processing, excellent detail levels and impressive upscaling isn't enough to convince you to give this TV an audition, the Sony KD-65AG9 (known as the XBR-65A9G in the US) has an extra trick up its sleeve.

Its next-gen acoustic surface tech delivers some of the most impressive sounds we've ever heard from a flatscreen TV. You can even use the TV as the centre speaker in a surround sound system thanks to the standard speaker terminals on its rear.

Read the full Sony KD-65AG9 review

Round up of today's best deals

Sours: https://www.whathifi.com/us/best-buys/the-best-65-inch-tvs
  1. Deadzone classic
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Best TVs: Our top picks, plus plain-language explanations of the most important specs and features

There’s never been a better time to buy a TV. Yes, we said the same a couple of years ago, but that doesn’t make it any less true The industry has worked nearly all of the bugs out of LCD and OLED TVs, and today’s prices are lower than ever. Or they were until this recent chip shortage took hold. 

Regardless, high-end 4K models cost about half of what they did a few years ago, and excellent mid-range models (55- and 65-inch class) are available for much less than $1,000. We’ll give you our top picks, plus an in-depth guide to the specs and features you’ll encounter when you shop. 

A different language

The first hurdle to understanding today’s TV market is an alphabet soup of acronyms and phraseology: LED, mini-LED, micro-LED, LCD, HDR, OLED, quantum dots, and more. Manufacturers also like to thicken that literary broth with their own trademarked, mostly nonsensical nomenclature: Contrast EliteMax, Q Style Elite, X-tended Dynamic Range PRO? Give me a break.

The good news? You can ignore all that ad-speak and focus on just three things: color, contrast (including the quality of blacks), and brightness. Technology changes, but your eyes don’t.

Here are our top recommendations in three categories. If you want a deeper understanding as to why we picked them, there’s an in-depth buyers’ guide further down that you’ll find invaluable when you go shopping. Click here if you’d like to jump straight to a list of our most recent reviews.

Updated October 19, 2021 to add our TCL 6-series (2021) 8K UHD TV review. Samsung and Sony should be looking over their shoulders at TCL, because this 8K TV costs considerably less than either company's 8K offerings, and its quality and performance are off the hook for price.

Best LCD TV

Samsung combines a micro-LED backlight with quantum-dot technology to deliver the best LED-backlit LCD TV you can buy. OLED TVs still deliver better blacks, but while this TV isn’t cheap, its price tag is nowhere near what you’d pay for a high-end OLED set. We have a few nits to pick in our review, but this TV is easy to recommend.

Runner-up

No manufacturer does LCD image processing better than Sony. If moiré, shimmering in detailed pans, jagged text, and backlighting blockiness drive you up a wall, this is the TV to buy. 

Best OLED TV

LG no longer makes our favorite OLED TV, Sony has stolen its crown with its Bravia XR Master Series A90J. This smart TV produces an absolutely luscious picture, and it features Sony’s audacious audio system in which the driver units are mounted to the OLED panel itself, turning the entire display into a speaker. The Google TV operating system makes finding great entertainment a snap, and its universal remote is backlit and easy to use, even in the dark. This one will be tough to beat.

Best bang-for-the-buck TV

TCL is rapidly gaining—and deserving—a reputation for building affordable smart TVs that deliver incredible value. It’s 55-inch 6-series is certainly no exception, combining quantum-dot color with mini-LED backlight technology to build a set with great color, brightness, and the Roku TV operating system. We like it a lot.

Best value in 8K TVs

You can spend a lot of money for an 8K TV, or you can spend a lot of money on an 8K TV. TCL's 8K offering is an incredible value for the quality and performance that's delivered for the price. If you don't need to have the absolute best in the 8K category, the TCL 65R648 is a fantastic deal.

The state of TV technology

CRT TVs were around for more 50 years and were still being improved when they fell out of favor. LCD TVs aren’t nearly that mature, and you’ll still find the occasional  entry-level models with color and contrast issues. Color and contrast have nonetheless improved drastically in the last few years, and the improvements have trickled down almost to the lowest rung on the ladder. OLED remains at the pinnacle, but remains expensive to manufacture. I’ll talk more about LED versus OLED in a bit.  

There’s also a resolution “race” in progress, though it seems to have stalled for the nonce at 8K UHD. Buying a TV with resolution of 7680 x 4320 pixels remains a pricey proposition, and there’s almost no content to take advantage of it. Apart from 4K Blu-ray, most video content is still delivered in 1080p resolution, even though 4K UHD TVs with resolution of 3840 x 2160 pixels rule the roost in terms of sales.

The best news, to expand on my previous point, is that top-end technology (quantum dots, mini-LED) has filtered down to the mid-range (defined as $750 to $1,250 for a 65-inch-class set). We haven’t seen one that quite puts it all together yet, but TCL’s 6-series come darn close. Too close, certainly, for the big three (LG, Samsung, and Sony) to remain comfortable. 

Even better, nearly all the high-end 4k UHD 65-inch-class TVs that cost $600 to $10,000 or more a few years ago have dropped to below $3,000. Even Samsung’s 8K UHD QN800A-series can be hand for $3,500 (65-inch class). LG’s 8K UHD OLED—the 88-inch-class model OLED88Z9PUA—is something to behold, but it costs $30,000. Ouch. Then again, if your entertainment center is big enough to require an 88- to 120-inch-class television, that price tag might worth the experience.

What to look for (and what to watch out for)

Resolution: While most content remains 1080p or lower resolution, the vast majority of TVs being sold now are 2160p (4K UHD, or 3840 x 2160 pixels). Unless you’re buying something for the workshop or tool shed, go 2160p. 4K streaming is now a thing. It’s heavily compressed, and it may run you over your data cap in short order, but it’s still a consideration. 

Good 2160p content looks spectacular, and most 2160p TVs will upscale lower-resolution content quite nicely. Just don’t believe any hokum about making 1080p content look like genuine 4K UHD.

That said, we’ve been incredibly impressed with just how much better both 1080p and 2160p material looks on the latest 8K UHD (7680 x 4320) TVs. More pixels, more processing power. 

FAUX K: LG makes spectacular OLEDs, and it seems the company has finally ceased manufacturing the 2.88K LED-backlit LCD TVs it marketed as 4K; specifically, the 6300 and 6500 series. So this is just an FYI in case you see a used or refurbished on for sale: You can avoid it, or you can use that information to haggle for a better price. You can read more about the subject in this article. They’re not bad TVs, they just aren’t 4K UHD. 

Screen size: 65-inch TVs are the hot commodity these days, but only you know which size TV fits best in your living space. Personally, I prefer 43-inchers. Go figure.

You can save a lot of money—$600 to $900 on a top-of-the-line set—by downsizing to perhaps 55-inches and sitting a bit closer. How close? 1.5 times the stated size of the TV is the recommended distance.

Note that the number of backlighting zones and other technologies aren’t always exactly the same across all sizes. Read the fine print carefully (if it even exists), as a 55-inch unit might not offer quite the performance of the 65-inch sets companies like to send to reviewers.

HDR: The acronym stands for high dynamic range, and it has become the norm in better TVs. HDR simply means a larger difference in luminance between the darkest area of an image and the brightest area. It doesn’t sound like much, but a lack of contrast (a comparative washed-out appearance) in LED TVs has long been an issue, especially at the entry level.

With HDR, which is created largely by significantly increasing peak brightness, light sabers and flames, highlights in hair, water, and other details really stand out. Trust me. You want it. 

dv vs sdr digitalart 2Dolby

So far, the TV industry has been scrupulously honest about labeling their TVs for HDR: HDR-compatible in the fine print means the set understands at least some of the HDR formats (HDR10, Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HLG, etc.), but likely doesn’t have enough brightness to do anything with it. If it just says HDR, that means it can do something with it.

How much it can do depends on the TV. You need at least 700 nits peak brightness at a minimum to achieve decent HDR pop (e.g., light sabers and flames that stand out), while 1,000 nits does the trick quite nicely. Vendors don’t really list nits or brightness in meaningful ways, so you’ll need to read reviews in which it’s measured. Non-HDR TVs generally max out in the area of 300 to 400 nits.

HDR format support: One of true ironies in the TV industry is that arguably the top player, Samsung, doesn’t support Dolby Vision. Nearly nearly all the other vendors do (although not on every model). All HDR TVs support HDR10 as a baseline, but HDR10 only sends adjustment info to the TV once, at the beginning of a movie. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ relay it continuously throughout the movie, so each scene (each frame, if necessary) can be adjusted independently.

HDR10 looks good. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ look better. HDR10+ is Samsung’s baby and its latest TVs support it. Alas, while many streaming services deliver HDR in HDR10+ (HDR requires very little extra data), it hasn’t caught on with most of the company’s competitors. On the other hand, many sets support the HLG standard that is common in Europe.

Contrast: Contrast is the distance in terms of luminance between the darkest and brightest points in an image. Part of HDR is also increasing contrast. A high-contrast TV is an HDR TV, although we’ve never heard of one called that. It just doesn’t sound sexy, I suppose. Anyway, he higher the contrast, the more subtle detail the TV can deliver. 

Color: We’ve noticed a definite uptick in color acuity (realism), even in the middle of the market, with TVs from Hisense, TCL and Vizio showing much truer reds and greens (just about any TV will do blue well). This is largely due to the widespread adoption of quantum dots, but even those without them (Sony’s TVs, in particular) have increased the color acuity of their offeringss.

LED-backlit LCD versus OLED: There’s a luxuriousness to the image that OLED TVs produce that appeals to many, including myself. Because each sub-pixel is its own light source, when a pixel is switched off, you get near perfect black. LED-backlit LCD TVs bleed light around and through the LCDs, which are not perfect shutters.

Even the best LED/LCD TVs can’t match the blacks of OLED. (Mini-LED gets closer—see below). On the other hand, they can generate much higher peak brightness, which compensates with most material and really makes HDR pop.

The main drawbacks of OLED as a technology are a relatively limited lifespan, and burn-in; i.e. ghosts of previous images remaining on screen. LG claims 100,000 hours to half brightness for its TVs: That’s where 500 nits becomes 250 nits, and that number of hours is calculated based on the TV displaying standard dynamic range material. HDR content will shorten an OLED’s lifespan.

With normal use (two hours a day), those drawbacks will never bite you. Or for at least not for a very long time. Using OLEDs for signage, all-day long viewing, or for rendering static images, on the other hand, is not recommended.

Micro-LED (not to be confused with mini-LED backlighting) is a non-organic self-emitter technology that doesn’t suffer any of these issues, but it’s still so expensive as to excuse itself from this conversation.

Caveats and economics aside, OLED remains most users’ choice when simply using their eyes. Puppies on velvet!

Note: OLED uses an extra white subpixel, but its RGBW is is not the subtractive scheme that LG’s 6300- and 6500-series LED-backlit LCD TVs use. Hence, their stated resolution is accurate.

Click here for more definitions, plus links to our most recent smart TV reviews.

Sours: https://www.techhive.com/article/3316544/best-tvs.html
Unboxing LG's Mind Blowing 8K 88-inch OLED Beast

LG SIGNATURE Z9 88 inch Class 8K Smart OLED TV w/AI ThinQ® (87.6'' Diag)

What people are saying

Rated 5 out of 5 by IAMSPEEDfrom Great Product I bought this for my 7 year old son and he loves it. I might get a couple more for him. It's cheap and great He loves it

Date published: 2021-02-19

Rated 4 out of 5 by CnChicagofrom Great tv but is there any way to make it smaller Love the look of this tv and power it brings but 77 in is so large for the room I want to put this in. Is there any model of oled coming out that is capable of 8k but runs in a 60 in type range?

Date published: 2020-08-31

Rated 1 out of 5 by Neon Phelpsfrom Viewing Height People are complaining about height of the stand and commenting one needs to sit on the floor to watch look at the picture on their ad the girl is about 5 feet away from the screen and yes. she is sitting on the floor in front of a sofa :) in my opinion, this says it all I own bot an LG 65" and 77" OLED- they are both GREAT !!! - and a lot more reasonably priced, though it may have cost this much originally. In fact, I bought the 77" to replace the 65" in my bedroom just for fun.

Date published: 2020-08-03

Sours: https://www.lg.com/us/tvs/lg-OLED88Z9PUA-signature-oled-8k-tv

Buy tv inch best 88

88 inch TVs

Boasting sleek, streamlined designs and interfaces, LG 88 inch class TVs are breathtaking to view and simple to use. Available with an ultra-thin and subtly curved display, or a slender, traditional flat screen, our televisions boast the latest technology and features, such as:

4K UHD Resolution: Representing the future of television, 4K Ultra High-Definition displays give you four times the resolution of Full HD 1080p, or 8.3 million pixels. This ensures flawless images, even when viewed up close, plus incredibly vivid colors and detailed pictures as never before.

IPS Display: All of our 88 inch class televisions feature the latest IPS (in-plane switching) technology, so you'll get crystal-clear images from anywhere in the room. With a 178/178 viewing angle, these displays give you clearer, more consistent images at wider viewing angles than conventional screens.

Smart Technology: With fast, seamless access to content via your favorite apps, streaming services, videos on demand and more, our Smart technology gives you a virtually endless range of entertainment options. And with the ability to share content between compatible devices, like your phone, tablet or computer, finding exactly what you want to watch is even easier. Best of all, with a customizable home screen, you can access the apps you use most and easily switch between them, pick up where you left off on an app, or find something new.

3D Viewing: With the option to watch 3D content on your 4K TV, you'll enjoy highly detailed images that virtually leap off of the screen. And with our one-touch 2D-to-3D conversion, you can convert your favorite 2D entertainment into a 3D experience.

21:9 Cinema Wide Screen: Featuring a 21:9 aspect ratio, a near-perfect match for Cinemascope and other widescreen formats, you won't see the pesky black bars at the top and bottom of your screen -- giving you a truly cinematic experience at home.

When you choose an LG 88-inch class TV, you'll get a television that represents the pinnacle in style and innovation. Boasting 4K UHD resolutions, plus the latest in Smart and 3D technology, they allow you to enjoy the latest entertainment in a whole new way. Explore our entire range of televisions, as well as our newest home audio and home video, and elevate your home entertainment experience.

Sours: https://www.lg.com/us/88-inch-tvs
The TV Buying Guide 2021 - What You Need to Know! - The Tech Chap

The 6 Best 80-82-85 Inch TVs - Fall 2021 Reviews

The best 85 inch TV in the LED category is the Samsung QN85QN90AAFXZA. It's a high-end model that's packed with features and performs well in both dark and bright environments. We tested the 55 inch model, but the 85 inch version should perform the same. Unlike OLEDs, LED TVs don't suffer from the risk of permanent burn-in, so you won't have to worry about potentially damaging your screen.

Its stand-out feature is its Mini LED backlighting. This allows the TV to get extremely bright, and combined with its fantastic reflection handling, visibility shouldn't be an issue in the brightest of rooms. It displays a wide color gamut for HDR content, and highlights should pop thanks to its high peak brightness. It uses a VA panel with a high contrast ratio, but it's lower than most VA panel TVs due to Samsung's 'Ultra Viewing Angle' technology that's designed to improve the viewing angles. Luckily, it has a great full-array local dimming feature that further deepens any blacks, making it an excellent choice for dark room viewing.

Unfortunately, the local dimming performs a bit worse outside of Game Mode as it raises the black levels, so blacks look more gray than black. If that doesn't bother you, it offers a ton of gaming features like VRR support, a quick response time, and low input lag for a responsive gaming experience. Overall, this is the best 85 inch TV you can get with an LED panel.

See our review

Sours: https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/best/by-size/80-82-85-inch

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Best 4K TV 2021: the top Ultra HD TVs worth buying this year

If you’re after the best 4K TV money can buy in 2021, you’ve come to the right place. 

In this list, we’ve collected the best 4K TVs to suit a range of budgets and use cases, combining 4K OLED, 4K QLED and LED displays from the likes of LG, Samsung and Sony to help you find the perfect 4K TV for your home setup.

We’ll walk you through the price, specs and features of each product, comparing elements likeDolby Vision andAtmos support,HDR color range andOLED panel technology. 

Naturally, many of these displays remain pricey –OLED TVs, in particular – but they still pale in comparison to the eye-wateringly expensive8K TVs available right now. Still, we’ve thrown in some budget 4K TV models, like the TCL 6-Series, to offer the broadest choice possible. 

Best 4K TVs in 2021

1. LG C1 OLED Series

New for 2021, the LG C1 OLED is the current king of TVs

Specifications

Screen size: 48-inch, 55-inch, 65-inch, 77-inch

Resolution: 4K

Panel type: OLED

Smart TV: webOS

HDR: HDR, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+Beautiful 4K/HDR picture+Four HDMI 2.1 ports+WebOS is fantastic

Reasons to avoid

-Reflective glass surface-No HDR10+

The LG C1 OLED is the follow up to TechRadar’s best 4K TV of 2020, the LG CX OLED. You can understand, then, why our expectations for the C1 OLED were immense – and yet, it has managed to deliver on all of them. 

That’s because LG has made a number of small tweaks to last year’s model. It’s now using LG’s Alpha a9 Gen. 4 processor for better upscaling and virtual surround sound audio, and with four separate HDMI 2.1 ports, it’s ready for the PS5, Xbox Series X, Xbox Series S, and whatever next-gen consoles can throw at it. Gamers will also appreciate the new Game Optimiser menu that gives you the option to quickly adjust brightness, contrast and VRR on the fly.

The LG C1 isn’t flawless, as we did encounter issues around how the new Alpha a9 Gen. 4 upscales faces, and how reflective the all-glass screen is in the daylight, but the issues are few and far between.

There are, of course, higher resolution UHD TVs out there right now like the LG Z1 OLED, which offers 8K resolution, and the new LG G1 Gallery Series that uses the coveted OLED evo panels that offer better brightness. However, we feel that the LG C1 OLED offers the best blend of price and performance and should be high up on your list for potential UHD TVs to buy in 2021 and beyond.

Read the full review:LG C1 OLED

2. Sony A90J OLED Series

Sony advances the art of OLED with the A90J

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 83-inch

Resolution: 4K

Panel Type: OLED

Smart TV: Google TV

HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+Robust sound+Nice new OS

Reasons to avoid

-Not exactly cheap-Missing some key features

Sony hasn’t held back in pricing the new A90J 4K TV with OLED, but we believe the performance does justify the hefty price tag. 

Picture quality, from any source, is about as good as it currently gets from any 4K screen, and in every meaningful department – motion control, contrast, edge definition, detail levels, you name it. For those moments when you’re reduced to watching sub-4K content, it’s great at upscaling, too. 

The Sony A90J is more than a few steps ahead when it comes to sound quality. Using the entire surface of the screen as a speaker is still novel and effective, and backing it up with two conventional bass drivers means the A90J sounds fuller, more direct and just, well, better than any alternative that doesn’t feature an off-board sound system.

Add in a smart new Google TV interface, the usual Sony standard of build and finish, feet that change position to accommodate a soundbar, an exclusive movie streaming service, and an authentically well-designed remote control, the A90J looks like the complete package. Although complete packages seldom come cheap.

Xbox Series X gamers should watch out, though, as there's no VRR support – though you'll find the 4K/120Hz capability and auto low latency mode to match any PS5 console.

Read the full review:Sony A90J OLED TV review

3. TCL 6-Series QLED with MiniLED (R635)

A beacon of hope for budget TV buyers

Specifications

Screen size: 55-inch, 65-inch, 75-inch, 85-inch

Resolution: 4K

Panel type: QLED (LCD)

Smart TV: Roku

HDR: HDR, HLG, Dolby Vision

Reasons to buy

+Uses MiniLED backlighting+Quantum dot color

Reasons to avoid

-Middling peak brightness-Poor motion handling

When we discovered that the new TCL 6-Series 2020 QLED (R635) would use MiniLED back at CES, we were shocked. That’s because, just last year, that same technology came to the high-end 8-Series and cost hundreds of dollars more than the ultra-affordable 6-Series.

It's not the end-all, be-all LED-LCD we were dreaming it would be due to its limited brightness and poor motion handling, but it truly is an exceptional value and one that we'd recommend to nearly everyone.

The 6-Series is brighter than before, more colorful and doesn’t have a single hint of haloing or light bleed. It’s designed in a new way to hide your cables and it’s the first TV to come with THX Certified Game Mode for 1440p/120Hz gaming.

It's not exactly the TV we'd recommend to next-gen-ready gamers looking for a perfect companion for the Xbox Series X or PS5 that can push 4K at 120 fps, but if you're buying a TV to binge Netflix, stream Hulu or, well, basically just enjoy your viewing experience, this is the 4K UHD TV that we'd recommend for you.

Read the full review:TCL 6-Series 2020 QLED with MiniLED (R635)

4. Sony X90J 4K TV

A great all-round 4K TV aimed squarely at the mid-range

Specifications

Screen size: 50, 55, 65, 75-inch

Resolution: 3840 x 2160

Panel technology: LCD

Smart TV: Google TV

HDR formats: HDR, HLG, Dolby Vision

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/news/television/10-best-ultra-hd-4k-tvs-in-the-world-today-1326405


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